@DavidMorganLLB

June 23rd, 2011

David Morgan

Employment Lawyer and Accredited Mediator

Partner, Burness LLP

Today we’re tweeting with @DavidMorganLLB, UK employment lawyer, accredited mediator, and one of The Lawyer’s Hot 100 for 2010

  1. @DavidMorganLLB, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @DavidMorganLLB?
    Hi. I’m an employment law partner and head of the dispute resolution department @BurnessLLP. I’m an accredited mediator too.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @BurnessLLP is a full service commercial law firm with offices in Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mainly large employers UK-wide. Commercial and public sectors. We’re big in media, retail and leisure
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Challenge of keeping up-to-date with developments in a fast-moving field: Age discrimination and retirement are hot topics
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I ask to visit their workplace for a tour. It’s so important to understand how their staff work, so I can shape my advice
  6. That makes a lot of sense. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I defended an employer from protective award claims following redundancies. Value circa £1M (Big for #ukemplaw!) 1/2
    2/2 There were multiple union-backed claims. High stakes. We successfully resolved them at judicial mediation in London
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m told responsiveness and client focus sets us apart @BurnessEmplaw. Relationships are important to #HR professionals
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    2 years ago – redundancies. Last year – Tribunal claim surge. This year – more positive: projects, training and deal support
  9. How is social media affecting employer / employee relations in the UK? Is the law evolving in response?
    Most clients now embrace it. But, for some, still a fear-factor as #HR see how it can go wrong by employee misuse at work
  10. Indeed. Your firm is part of the Employment Law Alliance. What does that mean for your clients? For your firm?
    Hugely important. ELA gives us a global reach to ‘best in breed’ employment lawyers around the world ~ http://t.co/6uA2D8K
  11. How has the economic crisis “changed the game” with respect to employment law? Is it changed for good?
    Redundancies etc. raised the profile/ importance of our practice area. UK Govt now proposing employment law reform 1/2
    2/2 Flipside is (as in other practice areas) economics mean that clients are managing legal spend and doing more themselves
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “I’m a job law expert”… That usually gets the party started! *sarcastic tabloid face*
  13. :-) You recently began blogging @ Defero Blog (http://bit.ly/kwo8Ye). Why did you start? Are you meeting your goals?
    Yes. I find the style of blogging liberating: colloquial and great way to get your personality across in opinion pieces
  14. Besides blogging and Twitter, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use to market your practice? How effective are they?
    I’m a major proponent of LinkedIn. I run a LI Group for #HR professionals ~ http://t.co/JY48bYm >400 members and rising!
  15. Congrats! Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Yes. My team and I have picked up 5 new client instructions thru LinkedIn. @BurnessLLP uses Twitter to recruit too 1/2
    2/2 And we launched a free Social Media Policy initiative thru the LI Group. Sent this to >100 new contacts/ target clients
  16. Innovative use of LI. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Thanks. Tackling the competing interests of a diverse age demographic and addressing work/life balance and flexible working
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Competition from external investment in BigLaw via ABS. More knowledge sharing amongst profession & clients. Virtual offices
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I grew up in Bermuda, so maybe something in shipping or insurance. Oh … or a superstar DJ ;-)
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    “Scotland’s leading employment lawyer” #noplaceformodesty #RIP
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    My 2 young kids keep me on my toes most of the time! + I’m a huge reggae fan (esp. 70’s/80’s roots, dub and early dancehall)
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your skills fresh with research and pro bono. Train in mediation and negotiation skills.
  22. That brings us to our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Law isn’t everything. Learn about business and soft skills – presentation, negotiation (& sales!)… Enjoy being a student!

That’s useful advice. Thanks very much for the interview today. I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice

Thanks Lance. I enjoyed it too. Great format. Thanks for giving me the platform.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@ljanstis

May 24th, 2011

Laurie Anstis

Employment Law and Business Immigration Lawyer

Associate at Boyes Turner

Author of the legal blog Work/Life/Law

Today we’re tweeting UK employment and business immigration lawyer, blogger, podcaster and budding drummer @ljanstis

  1. @ljanstis, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @ljanstis?
    Thanks Lance. I’m mainly an employment and business immigration lawyer in the @btemplaw group of @boyesturner
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @boyesturner is mid-sized commercial firm based in Reading, and won Best Regional Firm in last year’s British Legal Awards
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mainly mid- to large-sized employers
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Last year: legal (and expected) for employers to force employees to retire at 65. This year: it’s not. That’s a big deal.
  5. Indeed. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Usually how to spell my name. It doesn’t bother me, but I get asked it all the time.
  6. First time I’ve seen that answer…. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I acted for employee in one of the first UK whistleblowing claims. He won >£250k, one of largest ever awards in those days
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m experienced, practical, committed to their work, and I don’t pick fights for the sake of it.
  8. A good trait to have… What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Women claiming equal pay with men (or the other way round). Not typical, but big over the past few years
  9. Does the need for UK biz immigration practice get smaller as EU gets bigger? How is your practice evolving due to that?
    No. New member states typically have some kind of restriction on movement of workers for a transitional period …
    … plenty to advise on there. Current gov policy is anti-biz imm and makes it difficult to get good results for clients.
  10. You spent time in-house before moving into private practice. What does that experience mean for your clients today?
    It means I know that legal problems can often be overcome by looking at the practical issues.
  11. Interesting perspective. What’s it like sitting on the other side of the bench, as a part-time employment tribunal judge?
    It’s harder work than it sometimes looks to a tribunal lawyer – but good to be able to see both sides of the story.
  12. I image that’s helpful to you and your clients. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “Employment lawyer” is usually enough.
  13. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    Just over a year ago – on the basis of trying it and seeing what happens. That’s still the plan for now.
  14. You blog (Work/Life/Law: http://bit.ly/dQZzMJ) and host podcasts for your firm. Who are they for? Why should they care?
    Blog – for anyone interested in emp law. They should care because there are some interesting posts (and comments) there …
    … Podcasts – for busy HR managers. They shld care b/c its a free & easy way to keep up to date, and sometimes entertaining
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Referrals – yes. Engagements – occasionally.
  16. Nice that it’s paying off. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    How to respond to competition from people or organisations who don’t hold traditional legal qualifications.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Most legal services delivered by large organisations, with a few smaller firms in specialised niches.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    *long pause* I’d sort of like to be a cook/chef – but only on certain defined conditions that bear no relation to reality
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    Aaaaaargh – I have no idea *immediately books long retreat to find purpose of life*
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not much at the moment, but in quieter times I grow fruit and veg and play guitar
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your knowledge and skills up to date by working on voluntary/pro bono basis (e.g. http://www.thefru.org.uk/)
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Make sure you have more than just a legal qualification to offer potential employers – e.g. biz experience, language skills

Great advice. Thanks very much for tweeting w/me today. I enjoyed learning about you and your practice

Thanks Lance – its been fun.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@aligeary

March 22nd, 2011

Ali Geary

Anti-fraud, bribery and corruption Litigation Solicitor

Associate at Taylor Wessing

Today we’re tweeting w/ London litigation anti-fraud, bribery and corruption solicitor @aligeary

  1. @aligeary, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @aligeary?
    I’m an Associate in the commercial disputes group at international law firm @TaylorWessing. Author of http://bit.ly/htQe8e
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    my caseload involves white collar crime, fraud, asset tracing, money laundering and corruption as well as tech disputes
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    my firm represent lots of large public and private organisations as well as high net worth individuals
  4. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    in my field the Bribery Act is significant. It is also part of a wider trend of increasing regulation
  5. I want to talk more about the Bribery Act in a bit. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Great. I ask “Is there anything else I should know?” Knowing all the facts is essential to getting the best result
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    A high point so far was recovering £32 million in connection with one of the UK’s largest ever pension scheme frauds
  7. Wow – that’s a lot of money…. Why do your clients hire you?
    Indeed. I think our clients appreciate our frank, tailored and commercially focused advice
  8. Let’s talk about the Bribery Act then. Why is it so important? How does it differ from pre-existing legislation?
    It is a regime change. Most significant is the new strict liability offence for organisations that fail to prevent bribery
  9. How will it affect the business operations of companies active in the UK?
    It will most affect companies not currently required to comply with similar legislation i.e. the FCPA, however…
    all companies will need to reflect on their current policies and internal culture
  10. How big of a problem is fraud, corruption and bribery? How widespread is it?
    a recent survey of FTSE 100 Co.s by KPMG found 39% had conducted at least 1 internal corruption investigation during 2007-9
  11. Finally, is the Bribery Act expected to set the new global standard for fighting fraud and corruption?
    We await publication of the government guidance on the Act. This will be a good indicator of the UK government’s…
    commitment to fighting fraud and corruption globally
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    That I am lawyer and, if they haven’t already backed away, that I work in the field of anti-fraud, bribery and corruption
  13. First part never happens, I’m sure… When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives? Have they changed?
    I joined in March 2009. I spent a long time listening at first and slowly started to engage…
    there’s lots of talk abt the need to engage but I think some undervalue the benefits of listening to clients &contemporaries
  14. Excellent point. What does your firm’s leadership think of your social media presence?
    Thx. It’s v.positive. Our Managing Partner sent an email to the whole firm about @22Twts and this interview this morning.
  15. Nice! No pressure then…. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Absolutely.Next month, I am presenting to the legal team of a large multinational Co- all activated through Web 2.0 activity
  16. Congratulations on that. Let’s switch gears now: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Well,the Legal Services Act will change things a lot.I know this is something my firm is investigating http://bit.ly/hN5iMs
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Technology will play a much greater role. I see this as great opportunity….
    lawyers will be involved in increasingly creative and interesting work at the earlier stages of their careers
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d be pointing out the emergency exits on a 747. I wanted to be an air stewardess as a child. They all looked so glamorous
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a good lawyer who was passionate about her practice and a good bet when looking for a nice cup of tea and a chat
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    As well as the usual, trying new things. Recent projects include cupcake baking, falconry and tai chi – not at the same time
  21. Phew. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    I think it’s important to take stock of who you already know in the industry & how they or their contacts might assist
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    I would say -make sure you end up working in an area of law you are passionate about and all your hard work will be worth it

That great advice brings to close a great interview. Thank you so much for tweeting with us today; I enjoyed it very much

Me too. Thank you.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@andrewmmorris

February 22nd, 2011

Andrew M Morris

Solicitor – Advocate in the Criminal Courts

Part time composer for film and TV

Singer / songwriter / guitarist / weissenborn player

Today we’re tweeting UK crim lawyer, singer/songwriter/guitarist & former support artist for Peter Green & Friends @andrewmmorris

  1. @Andrewmmorris, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Andrewmmorris?
    I am a solicitor advocate (Criminal Law) by day and a singer/songwriter and composer by night.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I am a criminal solicitor specialising in Crown Court cases and representing those charged with serious criminal offences
  3. Exactly what type of clients do you represent?
    Those charged with criminal offences, but these can range from the very minor to the most serious
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    the right to defend themselves against allegations to protect their freedom
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I don’t have a set phrase about what I tell a client, it depends on each clients situation as I have to act in their best interest
  6. Makes sense…. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    This is really difficult for me to go into these cases. I have a duty of client confidentiality. But think Rumpole of the Bailey!!
  7. Fabulous! And that last tweet may also work as an answer to this question: Why do your clients hire you?
    am not sure why they hire me.I like to think Its because the client has confidence in my ability to defend them passionately
  8. That’s a strong selling point…. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    don’t have those kind of stats but there is always need for a criminal lawyer, as you can imagine especially in the current climate
  9. Indeed. Tell us a bit about your successful second career as a singer / songwriter / musician: http://mysp.ac/gs7oAJ
    Yes, played at glastonbury, supported @MarillionOnline , supported Peter Green, released two EPs, now writing for @Imagem_Music
  10. Wow. Does composing and performing music make you a better lawyer? In what ways?
    Performing certainly does, gives you confidence in public speaking and in court. Also teaches you team work when playing in a band
  11. How do you manage to juggle two very demanding careers? Do you think you’ll ever have to choose between the two?
    When you do two things you love its never hard to find time to do both, although my wife might disagree(!)
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I say am a lawyer by day, musician by night like a wierd superhero. People’s reactions are different but most people are intrigued.
  13. I certainly was…. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    My objectives were to meet like minded people and learn more from others and as a forum to express myself and to promote my music.
  14. What does the leadership of your firm think of your Twitter / other social media presence?
    I don ‘t represent my firm on Twitter. I only represent myself and my music.
  15. I see. All the same, have your Web 2.0 activities led to any opportunities for your practice?
    Not yet!!
  16. Perhaps one day…. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    For Criminal law its the Legal Aid budget in the UK , which is undergoing consultations to shake up the fee structure.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Solicitors and barristers profession may be merged or at least they will be working together under the same professional body.
  18. I probably know the answer to this one, but what would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    yes its pretty obvious! A songwriter or composer – but I am very happy with my career as it stands and have never had to choose
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a lawyer who cared about the cases I was involved in and always gave 100%. A Musicians who wrote a few decent songs!
  20. What do you do when you’re not working (assuming there is such a time…)?
    Writing songs, composing for Film and TV, playing live. I also like to keep up to date with legal developments, caselaw etc.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Stick with it as there is always the need for solicitors and lawyers in out litigious culture these days.We are a vital trade
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    That getting any experience you can is vital to securing a training contract, be proactive and believe in your abilities

Two good pieces of advice. Thank you for tweeting with me today; enjoyed learning about you and your practice

thanks for the interview, really enjoyed it.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@tessashepperson

October 13th, 2009

tessapicTessa Shepperson

Residential Landlord and Tenant Law Solicitor

Owner of Landlord Law, an online legal information service

Today we’re tweeting w/ UK solicitor @tessashepperson, who specializes in residential landlord and tenant law

  1. @tessashepperson thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @tessashepperson?
    Thank you for twitterviewing me! Who am I? Solicitor, wife, mother, blogger, author, Dr Who fan, the list is endless
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I am a sole practitioner, and work through my website service www.landlordlaw.co.uk – a 1:many service
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mostly private residential landlords, some tenants and letting agents, occasionally other solicitors too
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Hard to single out one issue. The credit crunch has affected us here, as it has everywhere, & caused problems eg with rent
  5. That’s understandable. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    As I practice via the internet I rarely meet clients face to face. I send them my standard ‘client care’ email
  6. Interesting; I hadn’t thought about that. Tell us about one of more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Alas I have had no big cases. However I am a trail blazer in the delivery of legal services via the internet
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    Because I really understand my niche. Although I do less casework now, the subscription service is more important
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Just now I’m doing a lot of writing, blogging, talks at landlord events & wkg towards a web-site upgrade. Fairly typical
  9. You offer legal info via subscription for landlords & tenants. What are benefits of this model for clients?
    a 1:many service is more efficient than 1:1, so it is less expensive. I help people do to things for themselves
  10. How do you market that practice?
    A few ads, writing articles for relevant journals, my blog , twitter, but most people seem to find me through Google
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at networking events?
    I run an online legal information service for residential landlords and tenants
  12. You blog at Landlord Law Blog (http://bit.ly/qLRGh). Who is it written for? Why should they read it?
    I started it 3-4 years ago as somewhere I could comment on issues + I thought it wd be fun. Readers can learn a bit & ask Qs
  13. Interactive approach (like service). What’s the general sentiment in the UK regarding lawyers using social media?
    I recently mentioned Linkedin at a lawyers mtg & got asked if it was an online dating site! A few eg @BrianInkster get it
  14. Wow. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Blog: My stats show that many visitors come to my website from my blog & it has helped raise my profile. Twitter: its early days
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    My husband tells me, too much! But it is always in my mind, say 25/7?
  16. 25/8? A lot of time either way…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    In England we have a new Legal Services Act. But above that I think the internet/web 2 will have a profound effect
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    People will expect to do business online as a matter of course. Most legal sources will be freely available online, but …
    … people won’t understand it so will still need us. More work than lawyers now care to think about will be commoditised
  18. Interesting. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I really enjoy writing so would probably have ended up as some kind of writer.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    An innovator who pioneered the online delivery of legal services for ordinary people
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I enjoy reading detective novels, cooking, watching Doctor Who, and spending time with my lovely family
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Decide what you really want from life, then work out how to achieve it. There is usually a way, you just have to find it
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Try to get some wk experience in a law office first, if you find you enjoy law, then go for it, otherwise do something else

That’s valuable advice to close this interesting twitterview. Thanks so much for staying up late to tweet with us!

It was a pleasure! Best wishes from across the pond!

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter