@mksinghlaw

April 12th, 2011

Madhu Singh

Seattle Small Business and Start-up Attorney

Owner, MK Singh Law Office

Legal Blogger

Today we’re tweeting with Seattle small business / start-up / entrepreneur lawyer @mksinghlaw

  1. @mksinghlaw thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @mksinghlaw?
    I’m an entrepreneur stuck in the stereotype of service professionals…
    MK Singh is out there just like any other solopreneur trying to grow and learn from others.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    the practice is about relationships. Relationships is about doing more than just legal work…
    We offer educational seminars, invite clients to networking events, make introductions, and even suggest ideas for their business.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Entrepreneurs, creative professionals, small to medium size businesses, and start ups.
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Intellectual Property – do they have it? and how do they protect it?
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I don’t believe in billing for the initial time we spend getting to know each other so ask questions or email me later.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    That’s a tough one. I’ve represented a variety of clients from the window cleaner to the next group buying concept…
    right now i’m enjoying helping a client with her new yoga studio. I guess they are all significant to me in one way or another.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I think its because they feel comfortable with me. I think of myself as an entrepreneur so we have something in common right away…
    I always make time to get to know the person and their business so that I can refer business or suggest resources…
    The best compliment I’ve received: ‘it doesn’t feel like i’m working with an attorney.’
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Business formation. Yes its typical. People are constantly innovating and i’m thrilled to be part of the momentum…
    I can’t tell you how many of my clients are microsoft, boeing, amazon, etc. employees by day and entrepreneurs by night.
  9. Hmmm…. How are your small business / start-up clients doing in today’s economy? Are things improving in Seattle?
    I think they are doing quite well. They are finding a need or a problem and striving to solve it…
    I feel like Seattle is a great place to be a start up. There are endless resources and the vibe is just incredible. Just today…
  10. How do the legal needs of your small business and start-up clients differ from those of other companies?
    Legal needs for startups and small businesses are more focused on governance, contracts and intellectual property…
    while companies tend to have more employment, non-compete and policy concerns
    Most of the work is done fixed fee or on retainer. It makes it easier to budget when you know what your costs are going to be..
  11. It looks like you offer a number of fixed-fee options. Is all of your work done on that basis? Why?
    I’m fairly flexible and its very important to me that legal costs don’t get in the way of building your business.
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I’m a small business and social media attorney. I work with those who who want to work with a knowledgeable innovative attorney…
    offering a new perspective and take on the legal profession.
  13. You write a blog, at http://bit.ly/i9LVaf. Who do you write for? Why should they read it?
    The blog is for people thinking of starting their own business. I strive to provide practical information in lieu…
    of reviews of recent case law. I get suggestions from clients and the community so its tailored for them.
  14. You’re also active on Quora. Has that been an effective marketing channel for you? Doesn’t it carry additional risks?
    Not as much as I would like. I think quora is bigger in California just based on some of the questions on there…
    Quora has done a good job of mitigating the risks by offering lawyers an option to automatically add a legal disclaimer.
  15. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Quite a bit! Its been extremely useful in building relationships and getting found…
    People check more than just your website these days and…
    if you want to attract the clients you want to work with then you need to make yourself visible I try to accomplish that via web 2.0
  16. Indeed. Let’s switch gears here: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Legal outsourcing. Is it being used? is it effective? why aren’t client costs lower as a result of it? Lots of debate in this area.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Probably a lot of outsourcing which will hopefully lead to more innovation in the profession.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’ve wanted to be a lawyer since I was 12 so I haven’t thought about much else…
    I think I would work on some of my other ideas: foodtruck, bags, shared space, phone app, or maybe go to bollywood and try my luck!
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As someone you could truly count on and who you knew was doing their best for you. And as an active member of the community!
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Exploring Seattle. I only moved here 2 years ago from KS so the whole hiking, camping, biking thing is still relatively new for me
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Network with lawyers who practice in the area you want to be in. Network in communities you would like to work with..
    I also recommend seeking out contract work and volunteering in the community and with the local bar association.
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    As long as you work hard and make the most of the opportunities available you will do great and you won’t have as much debt!

Thank you! I really enjoyed this tweet-erview (we need a better word for this).

Thank YOU very much for tweeting with me today. I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice.

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@douglasreiser

May 11th, 2010

Douglas Reiser

Founder, Reiser Legal LLC

Author, The Builders Counsel Blog

LEED Accredited Professional

Today we’re tweeting with LEED AP @douglasreiser, a Washington state construction lawyer and blogger

  1. @douglasreiser thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @douglasreiser?
    So glad to be here today, thank you for having me on…..
    1st a husband, then a worker, idea monger, brewer, sportsman & worst of all – a Cleveland sports fan. these define me from 12 to 12
  2. Well this just might be your year…. Tell us about your law practice.
    a 24 hour shop in my head. i built a remote practice that follows wherever i go. goals = access, comm., efficiency & understanding
    ……and i hope you are right about the Cavs (presumably you didnt mean the Browns or Indians!)
  3. Very interesting. What type of clients do you represent?
    those inundated w. construction concerns. the focus is on the business, their risks & protection. I also rep breweries, my hobby
  4. Nice hobby…. What is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Risk. businesses dont understand its extent; it comes at all angles, in all they do. I locate those risks and eliminate/reduce them
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That im here when you need me. you can find me 24hrs/7 days a week. i’ll clear my table to help you, because i love the challenge.
  6. Am sure they appreciate. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    significance is in the eye of the beholder. i think its green builders that i help wade through liability. new challenge for all.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    im a person, like everyone. im tangible; im understood. i lived/breathed construction on & off the job. people feel comfort in that
  8. What’s the busiest area of your practice right now? Is that typical?
    public contracting. today’s only fish in the pond 4 builders. i help obtain jobs & preserve rights. its atypical; recent explosion
  9. Tell us about your LEED AP certification. What does it mean? Why is it important to your clients?
    LEED AP isnt a gold key 2 green building; attys should never hide behind it. A step to learning what should be uniform in building
  10. What’s the next big legal battleground in green construction law? How is it expected to play out?
    field is set to determine performance liability + GBCI LEED challenges & the Int. Green Const. Code could spawn work for attorneys
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    im myself. lawyers drink wine – i drink beer (Stout/IPA). Im approachable in that image. sports are the best icebreaker in building
  12. You blog at The Builders Counsel blog (http://bit.ly/aWm9R8). What’s your strategy? How do you decide what to write?
    i heard @kevinokeefe say “listen” is key word in social media. 100% agree. I found the best group of talkers; i listen + add my bit
  13. Indeed. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use to market your practice?
    I have two blogs + @Avvo, @LinkedIn, @legalriver, Plaxo, Justia, @consupo, LawyerLink, Legal Guru, etc. – i try & be everywhere.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    People want an answer. Any atty can say you should consult an attorney/I need to see more. we’re transparent online; people like it
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing and enhancing your brand / marketing your practice?
    way too hard to quantify; its all the time. i try to listen to the online community all day & respond when i have a worthy thought.
  16. Understood. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    progression v. ethical restraint. A lot of attys are afraid to go Web 2.0. They are missing out and i feel its not fair to them.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    trans. tasks by legal biz’s w/o malpractice, billable hr., the office & a suit. Court battles: less formal, less paper & less fight
  18. Interesting perspective. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    your easiest question. own a brewery, create a web of distribution 4 craft brewers around US & fight the 3 tier system. retirement.
  19. What do you do when you’re not working?
    go outdoors w/ my beer writer wife (@beerblotter). travel around the world. check out new buildings in SEA. agonize over CLE sports
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a worker. someone who worked hard to find answers & innovate. dont need my name in gold; dont need a plaque. just happy clients
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    reinvent what you know about law. be innovative. find something you know and advocate for it loudly. people will find your voice.
  22. Our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    dont look back at law, look ahead. At school, find a job/opp that gives you a 1st hand look at practice. go Web 2.0 now! dont wait

good advice, Doug. Thanks very much for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed learning more about you / your practice.

Thanks so much for having me on today. Your questions were great!

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@vbalasubramani 2.0

April 22nd, 2010

Venkat Balasubramani

Founder, Focal PLLC

Author of Spam Notes

Blogger at Eric Goldman’s Technology & Marketing Law Blog

Today we’re tweeting with @vbalasubramani, Seattle-based internet-tech lawyer and author of the blog “Spam Notes”

One of our first twitterviewees one year ago, @vbalasubramani has returned to 22 Tweets to help us celebrate our first anniversary

  1. @vbalasubramani thank you for joining us again on Twitter. For those who weren’t here a year ago: who is @vbalasubramani?
    thanks Lance, and good to be back! I’m a Seattle-based lawyer, and blogger @ blog.ericgoldman.org & @ spamnotes.com
  2. What does your practice look like today? Is it different from last year? How?
    it’s similar – covers the range of online issues. I did start a firm (w/a partner)..this has been great
  3. Congrats! How have internet / spam laws changed over the past year? What does that mean for your clients?
    online rules are fluid .. privacy is a looming issue, as it was last year; platforms (FB) are becoming more relevant
  4. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that (the new) typical?
    online disputes have been particularly active, content scraping, cybersquatting/domain name issues, the usual
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    litigation is uncertain, time consuming, and often unfair – always explore a business solution
  6. That clearly hasn’t changed over the past year…. Why do your clients hire you?
    because I am a prolific twit? kidding .. quality work, efficient, responsive, creative & interested in the space?
  7. How do you describe your work to someone you meet at a cocktail party?
    tough ? (not many cocktail parties in Seattle that I go to) I represent internet/media companies in disputes & advise them on risk
  8. You need to get out more…. How has the economic crisis affected your clients?
    ha! most are doing ok .. everyone is trying to save $$, but this has resulted in more work coming my way
  9. How have your marketing objectives evolved over the past year? What’s driving that evolution?
    I enjoy blogging, but I’d like to create more client-friendly content..the social web has helped me see how this may be useful
  10. What do you consider to be the biggest change in the legal profession over the past 12 months?
    law firms finally realized they don’t hold all the cards vis a vis clients..also a basic change in the young lawyer’s place
  11. Indeed. If you had last year to do all over again, what would you do differently? Why?
    turn away more work and be much more selective – the intangible (non-monetary) effects of the work you do are significant!
  12. Interesting. You recently blogged about making a “clean break” from your blog to start a new 1. How did that end up?
    I’ve been blogging at Prof. Goldman’s blog, which rocks (hope to continue that) .. I may launch another blog as well
  13. You touched on this earlier: how has your social media and social networking activity evolved over the past year?
    lots more Twitter! I’m pretty unstructured about SM, I’ve tried to regulate it, but that’s not my personality
  14. Have you seen any impact on referrals and/or client engagements coming from your Web 2.0 activities?
    no direct retention or referrals, but that’s not my goal – I do it for fun, to stay informed, and chat with folks
  15. Last year “a loss of confidence in the system” = most sig issue facing legal profession. Still true? Why or why not?
    fair statement, the client/firm/associate/billable hour dynamic has (unresolved) issues..the basic structure needs tweaking
  16. What’s the next big frontier of technology for the legal profession?
    telepresence? – inexpensive technology that ‘simulates’ face-to-face?..minority report?..there’s always the iPad :-)
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    for starters I may be retired ;-) .. types of matters that typically go to a lawyer may narrow, lots of private resolution
  18. Retire? Sounds like a set-up for the next question…. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    own a restaurant, or a B&B, maybe have a cooking show or magazine (better yet a blog – I hear this pays!)?
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    as a contributor and a positive force
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Travel, yoga, enjoy family, food and cooking
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    opportunities always exist in downturn..get experience..blogging is a great way to immerse yourself & demonstrate commitment
  22. And our last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today
    be wary of echo chamber advice, focus on the fundamentals (esp. writing), enjoy life outside of the law – thanks Lance!

Great advice. Thanks again for coming back for a follow-up twitterview. It was a pleasure to tweet with you again.

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@djillpugh

July 7th, 2009

green_jacket_crop_smiling__tilted_head_D. Jill Pugh

Seattle Employment Attorney

Law Office of D. Jill Pugh

Author of Employment Law Blog and Employee Handbooks blog

Today we’re tweeting with Seattle Employment Attorney @djillpugh, solo practitioner and author of 2 employment law blogs

  1. @djillpugh, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @djillpugh?
    <140 char?! Happily married atty passionate about empl law & helping others, my work is a calling, not just a job; animal lover
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Only do empl law; I don’t handle ERISA or workers comp; I do discrimination to unpaid wages to unemp ins to severance to noncompetes
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    About 75% individual employees; 25% small businesses. Litigation and plain ol’ negotiations.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Hard 2 pick. Most common right now is wrongful termination based on FMLA or maternity leave; non compete issues R on the rise
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Civil litigation is a slow process; be proud of yourself for sticking up for your rights, you are setting a good example
  6. That’s a positive message! Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Hard 2 choose! I’m proud of helping a woman with cancer get a good settlement for being fired for being ill
    her boss gave her a poor review b/c she “wasn’t who she used to be” before chemo (!!)
  7. That’s an amazing story; I imagine it validates everything you do…. Why do your clients hire you?
    Experiences like that are why I love what I do – it is absolutely worth the work
    They feel listened 2, feel understood & have confidence in my knowledge & legal skills; also usu. I was highly recommended to them
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Big increase in review of severance agreements (> than normal #s of requests); also increase in non compete issues.
    They are common areas, just a huge increase in traffic. Slow economy = busy employment lawyers!
  9. I’ll bet! You’ve been solo for nearly 8 years. Why did you make the leap? How long did it take to feel established?
    Ah, that’s a trick question; I was also a solo from 1996 to 1999, but needed better business management skills. (cont’d next twt)
    I had an all contingency fee case load the 1st time, hard to pay the rent that way!!
    I saw law firms were pyramid schemes; wanted control over choosing clients, cases, my time. At 3 yrs felt established – the 2nd time
  10. From the looks of it you’re doing it right this time. How do you market your practice?
    Thx! I market with my blog(s); personal face to face networking; speaking at CLEs; publishing articles; Twitter; Avvo; LinkedIn
  11. You mention your blogs: you have two on employment law (http://bit.ly/RrIti and http://bit.ly/SBu1R). How do they differ?
    The Employment Law Blog is primarily aimed at employees & the Employee Handbooks Blog is aimed at employers/business owners
  12. Why did you decide to become active on Twitter? Has it been worthwhile?
    Critical mass of folks I respect on the solomarketing listserve were singing its praises; it has definitely been worthwhile!
    Twitter is an infinite source of information, friends, networking – I love it!
  13. Besides Twitter and your blogs, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use?
    I keep Avvo profile updated & answer some questions there; try to be interactive on LinkedIn; active on several listservs
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you seen from your Web 2.0 activities?
    In the aggregate I think it has increased my referrals tremendously; no direct clients from the 2.0 activities
    Makes sense though, my best referral sources are other attorneys, HR professionals, CPAs
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    It’s not always conscious brand development, as a solo I am always “on”; but my timesheets reflect about 30 dedicated hrs per month
  16. Let’s switch gears. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Ok! One big issue is how does the profession move into the 21st century? Technology outpaces legal developments & not just emt law
  17. Indeed. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Hmmm; I think there will be fewer mega law firms; more personal interaction w/clients; hope technology will be tool not a weapon
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I always say I’d be a librarian! Archaeology is another love; or I’d be a professional animal sitter :-)
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a passionate skilled advocate who fought with integrity; who found time to mentor, and made time for family & friends
    Preferably *not* remembered as just as the crazy cat lady! ;-)
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not working? Er? I do find some time 4 Rock Band on the 360, Mariners games, knitting, scrapbooking, Wii Fit, and 2 much pop culture
  21. Good point… What advice can you give lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    My advice would be don’t give up hope; create an online presence even if unemp; find ways to be noticed and to be helpful, volunteer
  22. That’s helpful. We’re at our last question: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t take out student loans! Ha. Seriously? Learn the law stuff, but also learn 2 market (even if you don’t want to be a solo)

Excellent advice. This was a great twitterview; thank you very much for answering our questions today

Thanks for the invite! This was a terrific experience!

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@bmarler

June 2nd, 2009

marler1

Bill Marler

Personal Injury and Products Liability Attorney

Managing Partner of Marler Clark L.L.P., P.S.

Food Safety Advocate

Author of Marler Blog, as well as Botulism Blog, Campylobacter Blog, Cryptosporidium Blog, Cyclospora Blog, E. coli Blog, Enterobacter Sakazakii Blog, Food Poison Blog, Hepatitis A Blog, Listeria Blog, Mad Cow Blog, Norovirus Blog, Salmonella Blog, and Shigella Blog

Today, we’re tweeting w/ @bmarler, Food Safety Advocate, MP of Marler Clark, Food Poisoning Lit Lawyer, Blogger, Husband, Father

  1. @bmarler, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @bmarler?
    I am a trial lawyer who focuses on food safety issues.
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    For the last 16 years I have been involved in every major food borne illness case in the US.
     
  3. That’s an impressive elevator speech! What type of clients do you represent?
    Primarily children sickened by food they consume.
     
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Proving causation – what food item made them ill.
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Great question – I tell them I am there 24/7 for them.
     
  6. Under circumstances imagine that’s reassuring. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Tough question – probably the $15.6M I got for one girl sickened in the Jack in the Box E. coli case.
     
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    other than my good looks? I think because of our knowledge of the subject, our experience and results.
     
  8. Maybe it’s all four…. What would you say is the most difficult aspect of representing victims of food poisoning?
    Certainly dealing with the death of a child. I have three daughters and simply can not imagine it.
     
  9. Why did you step in to get Michael Pollan’s book, “The Omnivore’s Dilemma,” back on the curriculum at Wash State U?
    Couldn’t help myself – It was the right thing to do. It is a book that should be read at WSU and all colleges.
     
  10. Indeed. A couple of months ago you offered $25K to charity if you got 25K Twitter followers. Are you still pursuing that?
    I got to 2,500 followers and donated $2,500 to cancer research. I am waiting on the next 2,500 followers and have a growing list.
     
  11. Hope this helps… You are one of the–if not THE–country’s food poisoning law experts. What’s the secret of your success?
    I work hard, very hard (some say too hard) – I am focused, organized and passionate.
     
  12. How do you market your practice?
    Frankly, by always putting the client first and doing quality work.
     
  13. Your primary blog is Marler Blog (http://bit.ly/xeenE). Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    In part I write it for myself –somewhat like a diary. I hope I give some insight into an aspect of the costs of food poisonings.
     
  14. You have 10+ blogs on food illnesses. Are issues so unique as to require disease-specific blogs?
    They are, but I think they are a useful place to put our spin on the news about bugs.
     
  15. For victims imagine it’s very useful. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    I think it is a way to show that we know what we are doing.
     
  16. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Honestly, I just try and do my job and the rest takes care of itself.
     
  17. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Maintaining high legal standards for ethics while experiencing more and more competition.
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    I think it will be more fasted-paced and more competitive. I’m clearly over 50.
     
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Flip of the coin – USDA Undersecretary of Food Safety Inspection Services or US Senator from Washington State.
     
  20. You clearly like a good challenge…. How do you want to be remembered?
    Frankly, as people know me now – hard-working, straight-forward and truthful.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    LOL – is there something other than working? I love what I do so much that it seldom feels like work.
     
  22. That’s great. Our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Do not be lazy. Work hard to make yourself invaluable to your clients and your community.

 That’s great advice. Thank you very much for a very interesting twitterview today

No, thank you.

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@seattlelawgirl

April 30th, 2009

valValerie A. Farris

Small Business Lawyer

Owner, Farrris Law, PLLC

Law Blogger

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @seattlelawgirl: small business lawyer, salsa dancer, traveler, auntie and friend

  1. @Seattlelawgirl, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @Seattlelawgirl?
    I am a Detroit-born, island-raised, entrepreneur-by-blood Lebanese-American lawyer living & practicing small biz law in Seattle, WA
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I help small biz owners plan 4 future success, limit liability, & avoid litigation whenever possible! I also do estate planning.
     
  3. Can you describe your typical small business owner client?
    Small, independently-owned biz, everything from artists to techies. Savvy, forward-thinking, active in Web 2.0 world.
    My clients are ppl who want 2 protect themselves (& their families) legally 2 ensure peace of mind & security 4 their futures.
     
  4. What, then, would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Avoiding litigation, for most. Plus learning not 2 be penny wise & pound foolish. Legal services can seem costly…
    but NOT having the right protections in place is even more so. How can I protect my biz while balancing the cost?
     
  5. Indeed. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
    Not as much as it’s hurting big biz. Small biz is better able to adapt to changing economy, which means less loss/negative impact.
     
  6. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I explain atty-client relationship & let them know I will always tell the truth even if they don’t want to hear it…
    I also talk about advocacy & the counselor-at-law part of the work I do, & that really gives my clients peace of mind.
     
  7. I’m sure it does. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Representing my sis when she adopted my nephew! Extremely significant personally, & also my 1st in-court appearance. Poignant & fun!
     
  8. A different kind of pressure than you’re used to facing…. Why do your clients hire you?
    b/c I am a small biz owner, I understand the needs & challenges they face. & b/c I value ppl & relationships; my clients sense that.
     
  9. How do you market your practice?
    For me, building relationships = marketing. I haven’t spent a $ on advertising & don’t plan to. Networking & social media.
     
  10. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    My brand is delivering intelligent, creative, & cost-effective legal solutions/advice. So, in a sense, every minute I’m working…
    …I’m building my brand! I also spend about an hour/day on web 2.0 stuff, & I attend networking events often.
     
  11. You publish a blog on your firm’s website (http://bit.ly/17tt7t). How would you describe it? Who should read it?
    I’d describe it as a plain-English intro to legal concepts & choices, & also my contribution to demystifing lawyers & the law…
    Who should read my blog? Small biz owners; anyone curious about the law; those who want 2 see a lawyer be real & accessible.
     
  12. What benefits have you realized from blogging?
    It’s reinforced my commitment 2 using plain Eng. in my practice & enhances my ability 2 clearly give options & advice 2 my clients.
     
  13. Sounds like a win-win all around! When and why did you become active on Twitter?
    A few months ago; 1st to see what the hype was about; later, b/c I realized I could provide value & build relationships here.
     
  14. Beyond Twitter and your blog, what other social networking tools do you regularly use?
    Biznik is my favorite – it’s a GREAT tool 4 indie biz ppl that marries online networking w/ in-person meetings, hosted by members…
    Their website: http://tinyurl.com/dybm2m Founded by @danmccomb & Lara Feltin, fellow Seattleites!
     
  15. I’ll have to check it out. How have your Web 2.0 activities impacted your practice?
    Without exaggeration, 100% of my biz comes through my web 2.0 activities & word of mouth referrals. Pretty cool, I think!
     
  16. Wow. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The most sig. issue = public perception of lawyers. We need 2 battle that by being better entrepreneurs & counselors 4 our clients.
     
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Like the rest of the biz world! Better client service. More flat fees, less billable time. More small/solo firms & specialization.
     
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d own a restaurant or B&B and travel half the year! That’d be the marriage of nearly all my passions (languages, food, travel).
     
  19. That would be a pretty nice lifestyle…. How do you want to be remembered?
    As someone who values people & relationships above all things. I want 2 be remembered w/ love & joy & laughter.
     
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Spend time w/ my boyfriend, family, & friends. Esp. my niece & nephews! Cook, read, run, dance, travel…soak it up and live it up!
     
  21. What languages do you speak?
    French, Spanish, & Lebanese Arabic…with varying degrees of fluency!
     
  22. And English too, of course…. Final question: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Work hard, play hard, remember what’s important. Invest ur time in ppl & things u value. Choose ur life, don’t let “it” choose u.
    Pretty much the same advice I’d give anyone. Don’t let law school rule u or change who u are!

Good advice indeed. This was a great twitterview; thank you for tweeting with 22 Tweets and answering our questions

Thanks so much for having me – it’s been fun!

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