@legallyerin

February 1st, 2011

Erin Russell

Atlanta and Chicago-based personal injury lawyer

Owner, The Russell Group

Author of law and foodie blog LegallyErin

Today we’re tweeting w/Atlanta & Chicago-based attorney @legallyerin: litigator, counselor, foodie, amateur photographer, gadget nut

  1. @Legallyerin, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Legallyerin?
    I’m Erin Russell. I’m a litigator, foodie and amateur photog. I’m licensed to practice in both Illinois and Georgia.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I recently launched The Russell Group. We focus on wrongful death, injury and business litigation & women’s legal issues.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    We represent people who have been injured, their families, business owners and victims of domestic & sexual violence.
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    My injury clients need fair compensation. My business clients need to protect their assets while they grow their dreams.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That our relationship is based on trust and on truth. Both are essential to a successful attorney-client relationship.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I recently handled a wrongful death case involving a man killed in a trucking accident on a snowy road. Really tragic.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    They hire me because they trust and like me. They know I am smart and qualified, and that I really care about their cases.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    My injury practice is growing, but my corporate practice is, too. So many smart people are starting new businesses now.
    Typical, hard to say. But entrepreneurship is definitely on the rise.
  9. That’s a positive sign…. What would you say is the most difficult aspect of being a personal injury lawyer?
    Gathering, quantifying and assigning $ value to my clients’ suffering. It is the nature of the practice, but it is hard.
  10. Can only imagine. You represent attorneys on ethics / malpractice. What led you to that work? Have you always done it?
    I love representing fellow attorneys, and advising them on ethics issues. Been doing it 3 or so years. …
    I started doing legal mal defense work in Atlanta. Now advise on social media, advertising, conflicts, all areas of ethics.
    I love representing fellow attorneys and am very active on ethics matters.
  11. Tell us about the women’s legal services you offer. What do they entail? Who are your clients? How do you help them?
    I’m excited about the women’s legal services part of my practice. It is really two-fold. First, I represent female entrepreneurs…
    and assist them in starting their businesses. Second, I represent women who are victims of domestic or sexual violence…
    on a pro bono, flat fee or sliding fee basis depending on income. Finances should not dictate whether a woman can be safe.
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I tell them I do litigation and talk about my corporate practice. People like talking about their dreams and goals…
    The best way to engage them is to talk about what they need, and what I can do to help them get it. It’s a lot of fun.
  13. Indeed. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    About a year ago. My objectives were then as they are now: To engage people, know them, and learn about them. …
    Marketing rules for attorneys are tough. More so in some states than others. Social media presents challenges. …
    But if you show a genuine interest in people, and form real relationships, social and business opportunities follow.
  14. Makes sense. You blog at Legally Erin (http://bit.ly/blQqsG). Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    Lawyers, people who like law, people who are curious about law. It’s no accident that so much of what we see on tv…
    film and on the news relates to law. It captivates people. It’s important and affects real people every day. …
    I write to inform, entertain and engage people. To create dialogue. They should read my blog because it is fun, accurate…
    heartfelt and engaging. I love suggestions and comments. It’s a way to open discussion and share.
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Absolutely. The Web is how people come together now. I get calls, messages on Twitter and Facebook and emails often…
    from people I meet online asking for legal advice, seeking representation, or seeking to refer someone to me. …
    It’s all about the relationships, and about letting people discover that you’re sincerely concerned about their issues.
  16. Congrats on that. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Economics, to be sure. The billable hour is no longer king. People are attracted to alternative menus of services …
    as well as alternative payment arrangements. Flat fee representation is becoming very popular, and is antithetical …
    to the old-school law firm model of practice. People are becoming more savvy consumers of legal services, and that’s good…
    In order to really thrive, firms will need to keep that in mind going forward, & continue to innovate delivery of services.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    It will be leaner, more flexible. Though traditional practice will continue, there will be more room for creativity. …
    There will be a much greater presence of virtual practices, and more accessibility for the average person.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    That’s so hard to say. I love being a lawyer and feel so proud and privileged to be able to do so. If I couldn’t do this…
    maybe I’d try to be a chef or a photographer. But this is what I truly love, and wouldn’t want to do anything else.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I hope to be remembered as someone who did good, who gave freely, had good intentions, and forgave easily. …
    I hope I eased someone’s suffering, helped someone prosper, and made a difference in someone’s life.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I try to create something beautiful. It balances the stresses of litigation. I cook. I take photographs. …
    I undertake art projects of varying degrees of difficulty to varying degrees of success. I read voraciously.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Remain visible in the profession. Volunteer. Be active in bar association events. Align yourself with other lawyers. …
    Also, try to remain positive, at least publicly. Things will and do turn around, and you have more control than you think.
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Work hard. You’re going to love doing this if you do it right. Get real experience. Clerk. Volunteer. Ask questions. …
    Also, be sure to examine many practice areas so you end up engaged in one you truly enjoy. And always be honest & ethical.

That’s good advice. Thanks much for tweeting with us today; I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice

Thank you for having me! I enjoyed it very much! Cheers!

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@nashlawfirm

November 16th, 2010

Brian J. Nash

Medical Malpractice and Catastrophic Injury Lawyer

Head of Nash & Associates, LLC

Contributing author to the Eye Opener legal blog

Today we’re tweeting with DC medical malpractice / personal injury lawyer and legal blogger @Nashlawfirm

  1. @Nashlawfirm, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Nashlawfirm?
    Lawyers & staff who luv their job of helping others, care about people are smart as hell & bring passion 2 the job every day…
    Peeps who inspire ea other 2 luv what we do & be the best we can be, 2 use the skills we have to assure victim’s rights
  2. Please tell us about your law practice.
    Boutique law firm in MD & DC w many yrs of successful exper. in civil litigation (med mal, catastrophic injury)…
    …former defense lawyers, who now represent people who are severely injured by bad healthcare and conduct of others.
  3. Tell us a little more about the clients you represent? Who are they?
    Mainly we represent victims & families of victims – real people, whose lives have been devastated by medical malpractice.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    So many cynics think it’s all about money. It simply isn’t! Clients just want 2 know-what happened? Why? Can they have their…
    …voices heard and their cases judged by fair minded people. Are you surprised to learn – that’s what it IS about?
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    We make our philosophy clear: bad outcomes do NOT equal malpractice. However, when people are injured by care that is simply bad…
    …we will bring our skill and experiences 2 make sure their voice is heard. We’re very clear – it is not just about monetary…
    …compensation. It’s about having people who cause injury be held accountable & then change their ways so others don’t suffer
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Too many to count, frankly. It’s been a great career. I’ve represented so many wonderful people. In some small way…
    …I hope I’ve touched their lives 4 the better. People w injured kids or who lost children or a spouse, great folks with…
    … serious injuries & needs that we’ve been able to help in some small way. How do you pick one or two out? You can’t
  7. Understood. Why do your clients hire you?
    For our experience, trial skills, knowledge of law, medicine, the courts and not least – the passion we being to their case
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Representing people when they or family member has been severely injured by medical malpractice. Yes, that’s our specialty-
  9. Makes sense…. We hear a lot of talk about a “patients’ bill of rights.” What exactly does that mean?
    4 brevity, here’s a link: “what” – http://bit.ly/cTmH9Q. What started as a broader bill covering not only accessibility…
    ..but rights and FREEDOMS- http://bit.ly/aGE3Af -became a law stopping insurance company abuses in terms of coverage
  10. Doesn’t health care reform address many of those same issues? Is that enough?
    It addressed coverage issues mostly. It never really addressed core issues such as “refusal of care” “informed consent”…
    …meaningful protection of privacy rights – basically some of the key elements of the contract b/w a doctor & patient…
    …which is the type of interchange, responsibilities & partnered care-giving that is missing many times and leads to lawsuits
  11. How do you see your practice evolving over the next few years? Will you still be fighting the same battles?
    One would hope that bad care will end and people won’t be devastated..then I could be a full-time blogger (smile)…
    …but why do I suspect that won’t happen soon? So yes, I’ll still be here fighting 4 patient & victim rights. God willing!
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    Much the same thing I’m telling your audience: I represent people who are the victims of real medical malpractice and real…
    …wrongdoing. We don’t sue people because of bad outcomes; we represent people who are victims of bad, negligent care
  13. Your firm has a blog, Eye Opener (http://bit.ly/bqnokj). Who is it for? Why should they read it?
    Our mission is to be an aggregator 4 all – medicine & law, issues affecting your daily life. Trends, news, warnings to make people …
    …more knowledgeable about their healthcare rights so they can be smarter advocates for their own well-being and safety.
  14. In addition to the blog, you’re active on Twitter and have a Facebook page. What’s your social media strategy?
    multifactorial: getting the “word” out is our mission, networking w some incredible people (and we’ve met so many)…
    …sharing knowledge, thoughts, opinions. Getting known? Perhaps, but I’ve learned – that’s not the real value of social media.
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Yes, but again, that’s really not our goal. We do very well with our rankings thru blogs, SM – but not our SM objective…
    …when I started 1 yr ago, it was all about US. My eyes are now opened – it’s about connections…sharing, networking. Luv it!
  16. Sounds like a perfect strategy. Let’s switch gears: what’s the most sig issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Real access 2 justice 4 ALL! Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement, litigation costs – they’re the insidious forms of tort reform.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Hopefully caregivers stepping up and admitting fault when they should, early case resolution, creative fees – put the patient FIRST
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Teach, build my networking skills, be creative in this expanding world of sharing knowledge via SM and the web
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    Someone who truly cared about the law and people’s rights. Someone who made a difference in others’ lives
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not sure when that is (smile) Traveling, catching-up w family & friends, learning new things, photography – quiet relaxation
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Don’t give up your pursuit of what you worked so hard 2 obtain. There’s always work for GOOD lwyrs who care. Find it.
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Understand that what you are studying is a living, breathing instrument to do so much good for so many people…
    …it’s not just a job; never take the responsibility of representing people for granted. Follow your dream!

That’s very good advice. Thank you so much for tweeting with us today; enjoyed learning about you and your practice

Thanks to you, Lance. It was fun. I appreciate the opportunity very much. Be well…Brian

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@JeenaBelil

July 16th, 2009

head_shot_for_twitterJeena R. Belil

Long Island Auto and Motorcycle Accident Attorney

The Law Office of Jeena R Belil PC

Former Managing Counsel, AutoOne Insurance, and First Party New York Regional Coordinator, Travelers Insurance

Today we’re tweeting with Long Island auto & motorcycle accident attorney and adoption advocate @JeenaBelil

  1. @JeenaBelil, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @JeenaBelil?
    Former insurance co. managing counsel – downsized in ’07. Now, solo home-based litigator. I haven’t looked back.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    40% Personal Injury, 50% Insurance Coverage Litigation, 10% Other Disputes
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    NYers who have been injured through the negligence of others & heath care providers who are denied No-Fault payments for services.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    The complexity and instability of New York No Fault Law and Serious Injury Threshold. New court decisions come out daily
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That no outcome is guaranteed and that settling a matter is not the same as losing the case.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    At my former gig, I had my name on more than 10,000 active cases in NYC & Long Island.
  7. Wow – significant indeed! Why do your clients hire you?
    Clients have said that they like my personal approach & that I break down the litigation process for them into bite-sized pieces.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    I’m knee-deep in bill of particulars & discovery responses. Want to help? Very typical. I’m creating the blueprints for trial
  9. You’ve been on both sides of the personal injury case, having worked in-house w/2 insurers. Isn’t that contradictory?
    No. It’s like an ADA going into criminal defense after a few yrs. I’m comfortable arguing either side of an insurance issue.
  10. What’s the *real* value of your in-house experience for your clients today?
    I offer an inside perspective on insurance claim handling, decision-making and defense to my clients….a look under the hood.
  11. I image that’s a very valuable perspective. How do you market your practice?
    I use high and low tech. Today, I struck up a conversation with a person in the post office who owns laundromats….
    He offered to put my cards on his bulletin boards, networking with other small biz owners, and, of course, Web 2.0.
  12. Besides Twitter and your blog (http://bit.ly/mTOCL), what other Web 2.0 tools do you use?
    3 FB pages, LinkedIn, JD Supra, list serves, e-zine, guest blogs, AVVO. Also, I’ll be on future episode of www.bearockstar.tv
  13. THREE FB pages? Hmm. What are the strategic objectives driving your Web 2.0 activity? Are you meeting them?
    Concurrently create interest in my legal services & give a peek at my personality. Folks will know me before they may need me. Yes.
  14. Makes perfect sense. What specific impact on referrals / client engagements have you seen from your Web 2.0 activities?
    About 50% of my clients come directly from my Web 2.0 marketing efforts.
  15. That’s very impressive. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I consider it my 2nd job & I weave it through my work day. I’m either learning something new or applying it
  16. Clearly that effort is paying off. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    In my line of work, it is the staggering amount of time lawyers spend in court waiting around.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    We are going retro & techno at same time: > solos & home offices. My wish: Video-conference cases w/ judges, web-based depositions.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d be doing stand-up comedy and starving. : )
  19. Good thing you went to law school, then…. How do you want to be remembered?
    As one of my daughter’s role models.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Adoption education and awareness, having lots of fun with my kid, getting psyched for kid number 2. Oh yeah…dinner & laundry!
  21. What advice would you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Stop saying “I can’t….”
  22. And our last question: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Take as many clinics as you can. You will get practical experience & you will help those in need…
    and during your career, don’t forget to say “please” & “thank you”

That’s great advice to close this great twitterview! Thank you so much for answering our questions today

Thank you so much for the opportunity.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@steigerlaw

June 9th, 2009

ls_20081Lowell Steiger

Personal injury lawyer at the Law Offices of Lowell Steiger

Author of Lowell Steiger’s Personal Injury Law Blog

*

Today we’re tweeting with Los Angeles personal injury lawyer @steigerlaw, who treats his clients with the respect they deserve

Hi How are you today?

  1. @steigerlaw, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @steigerlaw?
    A lawyer who loves representing injured people, caretaker by nature. Fighting the good fight for my clients :-)
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I represent people who were hurt by vehicles (cars, motorcycles, buses, etc.) defective products, slip/trip & fall accidents.
  3. Can you tell us a little bit more about the clients you represent?
    Anyone who has been physically hurt by someone else’s negligence (fault). Also rep workers who haven’t been paid OT, meal breaks
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    There are 2 important legal issues/Q’s for injured people: (1) Who was at fault and (2) did this event actually cause the injuries?
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I care what happened 2u, UR not a number. Your job is to get better, I’ll handle the legal part & guide you thru the entire process
  6. I’m sure that is reassuring to hear. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Yng motorcycle rider paralyzed when car turned left. We settled 4 just under $8 million 4 lifetime care BUT it was heartbreaking
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    Other than the bowl of candy on my desk? Zealous representation, thorough explanations, no BS, respect 4 client as a person in pain
  8. People do seem to gravitate toward the desks with candy…. How has your practice evolved since you became a lawyer?
    At 1st it was just me. Now I have lawyers & staff working on cases so that clients get all the attention that their cases require
  9. What would you say is the most difficult aspect of being a personal injury lawyer?
    Insurance companies denying fault or that my client is actually injured! That attitude infuriates me and I FIGHT them to the end.
  10. I’m sure your clients appreciate that. How do you market your practice?
    Nontraditional marketing. Clients come thru referrals, social media, my blog, word of mouth. I do what I love, that brings clients
  11. You blog at Lowell Steiger’s Los Angeles Law Blog (http://bit.ly/3VNJRy). Who do you write for? Why should they read it?
    An eclectic group who read it because they’re interested in the topics at hand. I include other points of view, relevant links, etc
  12. You’ve been blogging since 2006. What led you to start blogging about personal injury law?
    Blogging is #1 way to start a dialogue w/that great big world out there. Personal injury law is my passion, that’s what I blog about
  13. Why did you decide to join Twitter? Has it proven to be a valuable effort?
    I joined Twitter without a clue and found idea and resource exchanges, professional connections. Twitter is an incredible tool.
  14. It certainly is (& you clearly have a clue now). Beyond Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use? Why?
    I subscribe to a lot of legal and medical blogs and newsletters to keep me current and give me ideas that help me advise my clients.
  15. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements (if any) have your Web 2.0 activities provided?
    My clients’ cases benefit from my access to so many incredible people whose ideas and experience help me think & act outside the box
  16. That’s an interesting perspective. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Tweet for about an hour with my morning cup of Joe & throughout the day. I guess it’s branding but I think of it as communication
  17. It’s both, isn’t it? Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Big business trying to block consumers’ access to the courts through “tort reform” under myth of frivolous lawsuits (see next Tweet)
    Frivolous lawsuits are, in my opinion, a myth and the forces stating otherwise must be addressed http://tr.im/nVXi
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Hard to say (no crystal ball). We have to fight to maintain current rights & restore those lost during the last administration
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    That’s tough – I’d write about law (Grisham doesn’t need to worry too much yet) & work w/animal rescue organizations.
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a loving partner, son and friend, someone who did good for others
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Spend time with family, friends and dog, write, watch movies, go to open houses, drive around beautiful L.A. (I love L.A.)
  22. Our last question for you is: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Find the passion in what you do. If you love what you do, good will follow. Law is a wonderful profession.

Thanks for inviting me. This was a wonderful experience. I appreciate what you’re doing @22Twts !

This was a great twitterview. Thank you very much for answering our questions today

You’re welcome!! Thank you, too. I’ve enjoyed the experience and look forward to reading other Twitterviews. Lowell Steiger

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@bmarler

June 2nd, 2009

marler1

Bill Marler

Personal Injury and Products Liability Attorney

Managing Partner of Marler Clark L.L.P., P.S.

Food Safety Advocate

Author of Marler Blog, as well as Botulism Blog, Campylobacter Blog, Cryptosporidium Blog, Cyclospora Blog, E. coli Blog, Enterobacter Sakazakii Blog, Food Poison Blog, Hepatitis A Blog, Listeria Blog, Mad Cow Blog, Norovirus Blog, Salmonella Blog, and Shigella Blog

Today, we’re tweeting w/ @bmarler, Food Safety Advocate, MP of Marler Clark, Food Poisoning Lit Lawyer, Blogger, Husband, Father

  1. @bmarler, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @bmarler?
    I am a trial lawyer who focuses on food safety issues.
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    For the last 16 years I have been involved in every major food borne illness case in the US.
     
  3. That’s an impressive elevator speech! What type of clients do you represent?
    Primarily children sickened by food they consume.
     
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Proving causation – what food item made them ill.
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Great question – I tell them I am there 24/7 for them.
     
  6. Under circumstances imagine that’s reassuring. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Tough question – probably the $15.6M I got for one girl sickened in the Jack in the Box E. coli case.
     
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    other than my good looks? I think because of our knowledge of the subject, our experience and results.
     
  8. Maybe it’s all four…. What would you say is the most difficult aspect of representing victims of food poisoning?
    Certainly dealing with the death of a child. I have three daughters and simply can not imagine it.
     
  9. Why did you step in to get Michael Pollan’s book, “The Omnivore’s Dilemma,” back on the curriculum at Wash State U?
    Couldn’t help myself – It was the right thing to do. It is a book that should be read at WSU and all colleges.
     
  10. Indeed. A couple of months ago you offered $25K to charity if you got 25K Twitter followers. Are you still pursuing that?
    I got to 2,500 followers and donated $2,500 to cancer research. I am waiting on the next 2,500 followers and have a growing list.
     
  11. Hope this helps… You are one of the–if not THE–country’s food poisoning law experts. What’s the secret of your success?
    I work hard, very hard (some say too hard) – I am focused, organized and passionate.
     
  12. How do you market your practice?
    Frankly, by always putting the client first and doing quality work.
     
  13. Your primary blog is Marler Blog (http://bit.ly/xeenE). Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    In part I write it for myself –somewhat like a diary. I hope I give some insight into an aspect of the costs of food poisonings.
     
  14. You have 10+ blogs on food illnesses. Are issues so unique as to require disease-specific blogs?
    They are, but I think they are a useful place to put our spin on the news about bugs.
     
  15. For victims imagine it’s very useful. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    I think it is a way to show that we know what we are doing.
     
  16. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Honestly, I just try and do my job and the rest takes care of itself.
     
  17. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Maintaining high legal standards for ethics while experiencing more and more competition.
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    I think it will be more fasted-paced and more competitive. I’m clearly over 50.
     
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Flip of the coin – USDA Undersecretary of Food Safety Inspection Services or US Senator from Washington State.
     
  20. You clearly like a good challenge…. How do you want to be remembered?
    Frankly, as people know me now – hard-working, straight-forward and truthful.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    LOL – is there something other than working? I love what I do so much that it seldom feels like work.
     
  22. That’s great. Our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Do not be lazy. Work hard to make yourself invaluable to your clients and your community.

 That’s great advice. Thank you very much for a very interesting twitterview today

No, thank you.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter