@omarharedeye

March 30th, 2011

Omar Ha-Redeye

Student-at-Law

Ontario Bar Association Articling Student Ambassador

Blogger at OmarHa-Redeye.com

Contributor to Slaw and The Lawyers Weekly

Today we’re tweeting w/ Articling Student Ambassador, HazMat respondent, and author of the Blawg Review of the Year @omarharedeye

  1. @omarharedeye, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @omarharedeye?
    Remember the Shaft theme song? I’m a complicated man, and finally resigned myself to this fact. Just trying to have my type of fun.
  2. Well, your bio reads a little like a spy novel, making it hard to know where to start…. What are you currently doing?
    I’m in the last stage of becoming a lawyer in Ontario, Canada. We work under another lawyer in a process called “articling.”
  3. You finish your articles soon, don’t you? What’s next for you? Part of a firm or your own practice?
    No plans for my own practice any time soon. Litigation is highly leveraged, and cost consequences here make group practice prudent.
  4. Where do you see yourself in five years? What type of practice, what type of firm, etc.?
    That really depends on the opportunities. The legal profession here is still hesitant with social media, and I’m extremely visible.
  5. Indeed. You are the Ontario Bar’s “Articling Student Ambassador” for the Toronto Region. What does that role entail?
    Mostly meetings with exec. Advocating student interests. Encouraging participation in the OBA. Meeting lots of interesting people.
  6. You’ve seen how others do it. How well does the CA system stack up in preparing students for “the real world” of law?
    We balance strengths of US and UK systems; previous education, and practical experience. But only practice prepares for practice.
  7. You have a very storied past: nuclear medicine, health admin, corporate comms and PR. Why did you become a lawyer?
    I still do all of those careers in some capacity, even today. Law is just the newest layer in the skills and interests I’m pursuing.
  8. And how will your passions of the past shape your practice of the future?
    It’s the reason I engage in social media, I’m involved in the bar and teach. Life experience taught me to give back and value input.
  9. Nice philosophy. What lessons did you learn doing communications for a provincial cabinet minister?
    Politics and law are intricately related, there’s no escaping it. Any lawyer interested in reform or advocacy must become political.
  10. Tell us about going to South-East Asia after the 2004 tsunami. What did you do there? Where?
    We set up a medical clinic in a small rural area called Panton Labu. Only possible because of diplomatic relationships we developed.
  11. Must have been very satisfying to help that way. How do you describe yourself to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    Just Omar. Then find commonalities with them; there’s almost always something. Everyone ends up knowing a slightly different Omar.
  12. You blog, for your site http://bit.ly/f9zjmk and these http://bit.ly/em4ZpG http://bit.ly/8sA3xP. Why do you do it?
    I have a lot to say. It’s fun, and I meet people. And dozens Google my name every day. I have to give them something to talk about.
  13. :-) Congrats on winning Blawg Review of the Year for BR #278 http://bit.ly/g2wput. Will it be your last BR?
    Unlikely. We all need to engage in more online projects that refer to other sites, across jurisdictions. Builds stronger community.
  14. What’s the role of social media for lawyers today? Mktg tool? Relationship tool? Info tool? All of the above? None?
    All of the above. Few lawyers thrive in isolation/obscurity. People, including clients, are online. Let’s join them in a classy way.
  15. But you were “social” before social media (eg, Pres of 3 student clubs). Is online different or just diff channels?
    Exactly. Online activity should continue in person. Continuity is important, & I’ve always been pretty sociable before social media.
  16. Indeed. Let’s switch gears. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    How effectively can a service-based industry efficiently adapt to a rapidly changing economy without compromising client quality?
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Similar to today, given our resistance to change. But technology is a game changer, allowing firm growth we haven’t seen in decades.
  18. The answer to this one is probably pretty easy, but what would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Probably work on my other half dozen careers. Surprisingly not much different than now, i.e. writing, teaching, pro bono, comm work.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    The guy who figured out how to clone himself. Or work without sleep. The story isn’t over yet, and many memories to come, I hope.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Seems I’m always working these days. Family, friends, like everyone. A few eccentric reading hobbies. Lots of movies for down time.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    No job doesn’t mean you can’t work. Write a book, build a blog, volunteer in community. Stay busy, jobs will come if you’re positive
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Play the long game, starting today. Don’t succumb to negative behaviour. Nice guys do finish first, so keep giving to your peers.

That’s useful advice. Thank you for an interesting interview today; I enjoyed getting to know you better

Thank you, Lance. It was my pleasure.

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@aligeary

March 22nd, 2011

Ali Geary

Anti-fraud, bribery and corruption Litigation Solicitor

Associate at Taylor Wessing

Today we’re tweeting w/ London litigation anti-fraud, bribery and corruption solicitor @aligeary

  1. @aligeary, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @aligeary?
    I’m an Associate in the commercial disputes group at international law firm @TaylorWessing. Author of http://bit.ly/htQe8e
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    my caseload involves white collar crime, fraud, asset tracing, money laundering and corruption as well as tech disputes
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    my firm represent lots of large public and private organisations as well as high net worth individuals
  4. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    in my field the Bribery Act is significant. It is also part of a wider trend of increasing regulation
  5. I want to talk more about the Bribery Act in a bit. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Great. I ask “Is there anything else I should know?” Knowing all the facts is essential to getting the best result
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    A high point so far was recovering £32 million in connection with one of the UK’s largest ever pension scheme frauds
  7. Wow – that’s a lot of money…. Why do your clients hire you?
    Indeed. I think our clients appreciate our frank, tailored and commercially focused advice
  8. Let’s talk about the Bribery Act then. Why is it so important? How does it differ from pre-existing legislation?
    It is a regime change. Most significant is the new strict liability offence for organisations that fail to prevent bribery
  9. How will it affect the business operations of companies active in the UK?
    It will most affect companies not currently required to comply with similar legislation i.e. the FCPA, however…
    all companies will need to reflect on their current policies and internal culture
  10. How big of a problem is fraud, corruption and bribery? How widespread is it?
    a recent survey of FTSE 100 Co.s by KPMG found 39% had conducted at least 1 internal corruption investigation during 2007-9
  11. Finally, is the Bribery Act expected to set the new global standard for fighting fraud and corruption?
    We await publication of the government guidance on the Act. This will be a good indicator of the UK government’s…
    commitment to fighting fraud and corruption globally
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    That I am lawyer and, if they haven’t already backed away, that I work in the field of anti-fraud, bribery and corruption
  13. First part never happens, I’m sure… When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives? Have they changed?
    I joined in March 2009. I spent a long time listening at first and slowly started to engage…
    there’s lots of talk abt the need to engage but I think some undervalue the benefits of listening to clients &contemporaries
  14. Excellent point. What does your firm’s leadership think of your social media presence?
    Thx. It’s v.positive. Our Managing Partner sent an email to the whole firm about @22Twts and this interview this morning.
  15. Nice! No pressure then…. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Absolutely.Next month, I am presenting to the legal team of a large multinational Co- all activated through Web 2.0 activity
  16. Congratulations on that. Let’s switch gears now: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Well,the Legal Services Act will change things a lot.I know this is something my firm is investigating http://bit.ly/hN5iMs
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Technology will play a much greater role. I see this as great opportunity….
    lawyers will be involved in increasingly creative and interesting work at the earlier stages of their careers
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d be pointing out the emergency exits on a 747. I wanted to be an air stewardess as a child. They all looked so glamorous
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a good lawyer who was passionate about her practice and a good bet when looking for a nice cup of tea and a chat
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    As well as the usual, trying new things. Recent projects include cupcake baking, falconry and tai chi – not at the same time
  21. Phew. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    I think it’s important to take stock of who you already know in the industry & how they or their contacts might assist
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    I would say -make sure you end up working in an area of law you are passionate about and all your hard work will be worth it

That great advice brings to close a great interview. Thank you so much for tweeting with us today; I enjoyed it very much

Me too. Thank you.

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@Aswsolicitors

January 25th, 2011

Fiona Reid

Litigation and Family Lawyer

Director, Ascroft Whiteside

Today we’re tweeting w/ @Aswsolicitors, litigation / family lawyer and director of a firm in Blackpool, UK

  1. @Aswsolicitors, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Aswsolicitors?
    a 35yr old business owner, wife and mum of a two year old
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    we act for private clients. We combine traditional values with a modern way of thinking and vision for the future
  3. Tell us a little about the type of clients you represent. Who are they? What do they do?
    typically they are medium to high income working/retired individuals and businesses.
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    most certainly the value of their assets and safeguarding the value of their assets
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Litigation is costly but we can do as much or as little as you want us to and we can work together to help you budget fees
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    a client who bought a house suffered serious abuse from neighbour. seller of house made misreps on property info form  …
    saying no problems. important for client to recover monies to enable client to sell at reduced price and move away
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m down to earth, upfront, honest and play devils advocate. clients can see on http://www.ascroftwhiteside.co.uk/ that  …
    we are friendly and can even get to know us before instructing us
  8. Indeed they can. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    our wills and probate dept is always our most active area due to our longstanding reputation and long estd Will dept
  9. How have the economic challenges of the past few years impacted your clients? Are you seeing signs of recovery?
    Prior to 2008 residential and commercial conveyancing was booming and as you can guess, we took a big impact on those  …
    areas. we are now seeing a growth in both areas but slow growth and probably more sustainable
  10. How are you transforming a 130+ year-old firm into “a forward thinking, creative, modern biz”? Why is that important?
    making new solid foundations, modern leadership, future online services + social media. Change is important because of  …
    imminent threats to legal profession. Hanging on to old ways is not an option
  11. Speaking of change, let’s talk about Tesco law. What does it mean to your clients? To the legal profession?
    clients: more choice of provider. Legal Profession: Its a big wake up call. To some it’s doom and gloom. me? an opportunity
  12. Nicely put re Tesco Law. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I say I’m a Solicitor. I then get told that I don’t look or act like one!
  13. :-) When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    about 6 mths ago. Initially it was a trial and to learn how to use it. Now it facilitates my networking and part of routine
  14. More broadly speaking, how important is social media and social networking to your firm’s marketing efforts?
    very It helps me keep in touch and make new contacts. also helps show that we are normal-not unapproachable and intimidating
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    yes. Mainly through Facebook. Had more contacts through Twitter rather than clients
  16. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    the sad fact that soon we won’t be a “profession” – just one of a number of legal services providers
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    reduced number of high st firms. those still around will be focussing on niche areas and online service
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I can honestly say that business is my passion not being a lawyer so i would work on any business
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    as someone who inspired people to be who they want to be
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    spending time with my family, doing classes at the gym and reading
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    try not to be too general in the area of law you want to practise. Think:what’s going on in the country. how can you meet  ..
    those needs? finally, be positive!
  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    there are a lot of doom mongers out there. Avoid them. If your heart is in law, stick at it. Be different, not a stereotype

That’s great advice. Thanks so much for the interview today; I really enjoyed learning more about you & your practice

Thanks Lance. Have a good evening ;-)

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@hampshirelawyer

October 19th, 2010

Gabor Kovacs

UK Litigation / Disputes Lawyer

Author of Hampshire Lawyer: Seeing the Wood for the Trees

Podcaster and Photographer

Today we’re tweeting with Hampshire, UK-based litigation / disputes lawyer, blogger, photographer, and podcaster @HampshireLawyer

  1. @HampshireLawyer, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @HampshireLawyer?
    a 51 year old husband and father who happens to earn his living as a lawyer
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    now in a small country town, mainly representing private clients, soon to move to a small commercial firm in a larger town
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    private individuals and owner-managed businesses
  4. And what is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Private clients – the value of their property, protecting that value, leaving something for their kids …
    … Biz clients – it all boils down to keeping head above water
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    litigation is expensive; consider alternatives; don’t go to Court unless committed to the time hassle expense
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    11 years ago instructed by 3 guys with small co. Engineers with no business sense. Small case but to lose would kill co…
    …8 years later they sold for £m+. I still represent one of them (others retired)
  7. Wow, that’s great. Why do your clients hire you?
    reputation of firm, recommendation to me. I try to cut to the core issues to achieve cost effective outcomes
  8. I’m sure they appreciate that. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    no 1 thing, but sadly a lot of neighbour disputes, boundaries; often caused by car parking space needs. All take, no give
  9. You recently announced a move from a private client practice to a commercial practice. Why the change?
    litigation for private clients is dying on its feet. Process too expensive and risky. Best advice not to go there…
    … So with diminishing workload/fee income I had to look for the work where it is. That means focussing on business clients
  10. Do you think you’re alone in changing your approach? Will access to lawyers eventually be limited to wealthy elite?
    I doubt I’m alone. If I am, there will be some extinct dinosaurs out there. Access to justice is a real issue …
    … I think there needs to be a “simple cases” track with a slimmed down procedure for disclosure etc, 1/2 day trial …
    … Fixed costs awarded to winner. Possibly rough justice, but a product I could sell
  11. Interesting. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I used to say I play sax at Ronnie Scotts (jazz club in London). Until I met someone who did! …
    … Often still flippant, something like fat cat lawyer manqué.
  12. How do you market your law practice? How has it changed over the past five years?
    stop waiting for work to come through door. Work the contacts. Visit clients (esp biz) at their place. I don’t believe …
    … in offering freebies or loss leaders to new clients. Prefer to say meter not running till we agree I can achieve something
  13. You’re very active on Twitter (as @hampshirelawyer and @gaborelectric). What’s your Twitter strategy?
    strategy, moi? If anything, it’s about engaging, being known, profile raising. If a strategy, it’s still being worked out
  14. :-) You’ve got 3 blogs, including one on law (http://bit.ly/9iRKu9). Why do you blog? Why should others visit them?
    Legal blog started as part self-promotion, part to sell blog idea to firm. Rely on others/twitter to spread word…
    … I guess others visit following links with reference to subject matter of post as of interest …
    … music podcast a hobby so visitors have common interest. Ditto photo-blog. 2 other blogs r for me don’t care if no visitors
  15. I’d say they’re worth visiting. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    surprised but yes. Instructions both via twitter (lawyer referral) and anonymous participation in online legal advice forum
  16. Very interesting. Let’s change gears now: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    finding and maintaining the quality work justifying realistic fees; pressures impacting ability to deliver quality service
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    at my level, more smaller niche specialist expert firms. Fewer high street generalists. Black hole areas of no legal service
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    No idea! Law was the one idea for Uni course my parents never talked me out of! Possibly teacher, probably languages?
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    other than for my striking resemblance to Bryan Ferry? As someone who made a difference, someone who cared
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    indie music; photography; garden & enjoy home grown fruit & veg; support parents (dad had bad stroke April); family stuff
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Stay active; keep brain engaged; consider pro-bono type work; blog and tweet; network network network
  22. Last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    not enough just to be a good lawyer (although a given). Understand the business of law. Make, nurture, keep contacts …
    … especially your non lawyer contemporaries: when you are senior they will be too. Do favours; pay it forward

That’s very good advice. Thanks so much for tweeting with us today; enjoyed learning more about you & your practice

You’re welcome, I enjoyed it. It’s a challenge to fit something worth saying into 140 characters! Good evening.

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@matthewdevries

March 18th, 2010

Matthew J. DeVries

Construction Attorney

LEED Accredited Professional

Partner, Smith Cashion & Orr, PLC

Author of Best Practices Construction Law

Today we’re tweeting with LEED AP @matthewdevries, a Nashville-based construction lawyer and blogger

  1. @matthewdevries thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @matthewdevries?
    Thx. Best description: Christ follower. Husband. Dad to 5 (soon 6) kids. Construction Atty. Speaker. Author wannabe.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    My practice: 75% Construction; 25% Commercial Litigation; 10% blogging,marketing,speaking. That’s 110% practice!!!
  3. You’ve probably underestimated it at that…. What type of clients do you represent?
    My clients: Owners, A/E, contractors, subk, suppliers. This yr also included many pro-bono clients, nonprofits
  4. And what is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Issue affecting clients: hard economic times affect everything, from contract drafting to claims to liens to collection
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I tell every new client that I will pour my heart into their case, give them my all, but I will always play by the rules
  6. Am sure they appreciate that. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Major representation included huge win for road builder following wk long trial. On appeal now …
    Other major representation involved guiding a local homeless non-profit and helping w/construction of new facility
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I hope clients hire me for my work ethic, experience, litigation track record. But it may just be my good looks (NOT)
  8. What type of billing arrangements are your clients requesting? Is that typical?
    Primary billing arrangement remains hourly. Had a number of blended terms lately: reduced fee + contingency (mostly liens)
  9. Tell us about your LEED AP certification. What does it mean? Why is it important to your clients?
    LEED AP = certification involving @usgbc; means you have understanding of green bldg practices & LEED Rating System …
    LEED AP is imp to clients b/c they need advice on new risks and how to allocate that risk on green projects
  10. More and more builders are adapting green building techniques. What are some of the legal dangers of “going green”?
    Dangers of going green: new risks & failed expectations. Contracts are mechanism to address both of these.
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    Anyone who meets me knows I love my wife/kids. As father and atty, I prepare for unknown. I am a chaos manager! …
    If they ask “what is construction law” I say contract disputes, arguments over concrete, payment disputes, falling buildings
  12. You blog about a wide variety of topics. What’s your overall blogging strategy? How do you decide what to write on?
    I blog about the things that interest my clients, whether strictly construction, leadership, technology, family …
    …my friend @cordellparvin had a good post yesterday: http://bit.ly/dBb0di It’s easy to find topics. Hard to find the time
  13. Indeed. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use to market your practice?
    Other Web 2.0 tools: LinkedIn somewhat; Facebook for friends and family, although I see others using FB for business.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Impact of Web2.0: Gets my name out. New speaking opportunities. Few new clients from cold calls. Mostly name recog, though.
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Don’t tell my partners but I spend about 1hr per day (+/-) developing my brand. I am getting more efficient though b
    BTW, none of them Tweet, so I think I’m safe…
  16. Mum’s the word…. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Ouch. Tough one … ETHICS! “First thing we do is kill all the lawyers” Was a compliment long ago. Now, butt end of a joke …
    Was heckled by participant in presentation last week for being “Atty”. That mentality is what we have to change.BTW, none of them Tweet, so I think I’m safe…
  17. Yikes. That doesn’t sound like fun. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Legal landscape in 10yrs: Hopefully we are more efficient in our work by relying on technology. More virtual work.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    If not a lawyer, I would love to be motivational-family-leadership speaker guy and author! I still may be day … Watch out!
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    What’s up with the tough questions? Save the zingers for the end? …
    I would want to be remembered by legacy of raising good kids who love God, work hard, serve others, enjoy life to fullest.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not working. What’s that? When not “at” work, I manage chaos at home, make gourmet meals, enjoy kids. Golf sometimes.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Unemployed attys, find your passion! Here are a few posts I did on this issue: http://bit.ly/5hvpnV and http://bit.ly/cTAUIG
  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Hate to do this, but see prior answer. Can’t stress enough how imp it is to love what ur doing. Find that out b4 law sch.

No apologies needed; it’s good advice. Thanks for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed it very much.

Thanks for the interview. I enjoyed it! Gotta run. New chaos: family member w/kidney stones! Thanks again.

Good luck!

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@richardjaffe

January 14th, 2010

me-and-the-kidsRichard S. Jaffe

Partner, Cohen & Jaffe, LLP

Volunteer Paramedic

Firefighter

Author of Medic Interrupted blog

Today we’re tweeting with @richardjaffe, who is “living life as a paramedic beneath the epidermis of an attorney”

  1. @richardjaffe thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @richardjaffe?
    Tx for having me Lance. A father, son, medic, firefighter, attorney, and soulful insomniac.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I rep injured accident victims, and doctors against ins carriers who try to deceive them.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    healthcare providers- doctors, chiros, dentists, etc. and accident victims- anyone cheated by insurance industry.
  4. What’s the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    the insurance industry threat of bending the law to kill healthcare
  5. That’s an issue of importance to all of us…. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I make sure they know I will tell them what they need to know, which is not necessarily what they want to hear.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Pro-bono millions 4 extended family whose sole income was the salary of a young woman who died in 9/11. we cried alot.
  7. Wow. That must have been a great moment. Why do your clients hire you?
    my grasp of medical nuances as both art and business , my notions of sympathy, corporate accountability n responsibility
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    insurance companies, especially no fault carriers, R refusing 2 pay doctors more aggressively lately.
  9. It must be extremely challenging to balance an active legal career and work as a volunteer paramedic How do you do it?
    lots of coffee, no sleep, heartfelt ‘thank yous’ from clients, and the adrenaline from my medic calls
  10. How does your work as a paramedic help you be a better lawyer? Are you a better paramedic because you’re a lawyer too?
    i revive my adversaries after I anhiliate them in court. Lol
  11. Job security…. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I tell them I speak softly and carry a big stick in one hand, and trauma shears in the other.
  12. You blog at Medic Interrupted (http://bit.ly/514b9r). Who is the blog for? Why should they read it?
    theres some atty, medic and dad in each post, blend of which I hope helps readers contrast life’s ironies with its realities
  13. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you regularly use to market your practice?
    avvo, list serves, and linkedin. I also like skype and email w/old hi school classmates. we are a small closely knit bunch
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    after seeing me on the web, clients seem much more decisive in retaining me. they feel good talking about EMS w/me too
  15. Others have said the same (not the EMS part…) How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I get brand epiphanies randomly. Im always looking and listening for new ideas to incorporate into my practice
  16. Let’s switch gears a bit: what do you think is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    State Court system inefficiency and court administration red tape, and the govt’s apathy towards both.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    mostly product of the age of internet- less handshake deals, faster transactions, more international jurisdictional issues
  18. Maybe we already know the answer to this one? What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Medic or kids summer camp director by day, inventor of Ralph’s Ices flavors by nite. Luv Ralphs! http://bit.ly/51XPA8
  19. Now I’m hungry for a snack…. How do you want to be remembered?
    An inspirator of connection, compassion and humanity who gave my kids more life opportunities than I ever had
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    family time, EMS, and occasionally I smoke a nice cigar with close friends in a clandestine location
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Learn to speak at least one new language- clients and opportunities will increase exponentially
  22. What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    to quote my talented, esteemed attorney colleague Anthony Collelouori (….)
    “Go ‘cuz U R called 2 the law. Don’t go 2 get rich, or 2 help others, Go ‘cuz it’s vital 2 U! If U do, the rest will come”

That’s valuable advice. Thanks so much for answering our questions today; was great to learn about you & your practice

thanks for the privilege of being your guest. Loved it.

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