@HyperionLaw

May 31st, 2011

Cynthia Gilbert

Entrepreneurial Patent Attorney

Founder of Hyperion Law

Author of the Hyperion Law Blog

Today we’re tweeting Boston IP lawyer, passionate technologist, and founder of her own law firm @HyperionLaw

  1. @HyperionLaw, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @HyperionLaw?
    I’m a technologist, early adopter/geek, patent attorney. I passionately do outstanding work for clients I really believe in.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    It’s a radically different law firm focused on translating complex patent-ese into strategic business advice for tech companies
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I love working w/ emerging tech companies – any company with software tech, eg 2 computers & internet cloud, is right up my alley!
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Understanding case law’s impact on software #patents & how to draft claims satisfying legal reqs while remaining useful to business
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Patents are a critical tool – or tragic waste of $. Let’s discuss business goals to understand whether you benefit from filing one!
  6. Interesting. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    A diabetes co had new glucose tools for useful, fun data interaction; it was satisfying to help them go from hard- to soft-ware IP!
  7. I’ll bet it was. Why do your clients hire you?
    An experienced, personable attorney & unabashed geek w/ solid tech background, I keep us focused on business benefits of IP
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Software #patents for tech companies with some friends-and-family or angel funding. It’s what I love so I hope it remains typical :)
  9. You spent 5 years in a big firm before starting your own. What led you that decision? Are you meeting your objectives?
    Normal fee & firm structures reduce/kill interaction between experienced attys & clients. I saw a different way. Totally successful!
  10. That’s great! How are your small / med-sized tech company clients doing in this economy? Is the crisis over for them?
    If you’re cash-constrained, I suspect there’s always a crisis! But these clients are adaptive and smart; they create ways to survive
  11. What’s the next big frontier of IP law? Who will be most affected by it?
    The biggest battle is always over growing fees. A new biz trying to preserve IP options will find it harder to afford key advice.
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “I help companies protect their world-changing technology via strategic use of IP. And run a radically different law firm to do so.”
  13. Nice. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    2008. I wanted to continue developing relationships w/ favorite clients. Now I also want to get to know others working w/ tech cos
  14. You blog at Hyperion Law (http://bit.ly/mMg8lK). Who do your write it for? Why should they read it?
    Anyone who has to deal w/ US software #patents: CxO, GCs, entrepreneurs. I provide useful & jargon-free info, which is hard to find!
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Absolutely. One of my clients hired me after reading my posts on Quora; others decide to hire me when they read the blog.
  16. Congrats on that. Let’s change gears now: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    We *could* tell clients we see their biz realities and will revamp the biz of law to forge even closer ties with them. But will we?
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Cynically, I suspect it will look much the same as it does today! Some going w/ tried & true; some working creatively w/clients.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    An astrophysicist or an anthropologist. Or maybe an anthropologist who studies humanity’s obsession with the universe ;)
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    As someone who lived and loved passionately and joyfully, gave back to the community, and was fun to be around.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I read fascinating non-fiction, check out new restaurants with my friends, travel the world with my husband, and spoil our two cats.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Take the time to do some serious soul searching about what you really want and gather info on how to get it. Don’t despair!
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Talk to many lawyers, get as much work experience in a law practice as you possibly can; work hard to understand the path you’re on

Great advice. Thank you very much for today’s interview. I enjoyed getting to know you and your practice

Thank you! I really enjoyed the discussion!

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@cyberlaw

September 23rd, 2010

Kevin Thompson

International intellectual property attorney

Member, Davis McGrath LLC

Author of legal blog Cyberlaw Central

Five-time host of Blawg Review: #42, #93, #144, #213, #256

Today we’re tweeting with Chicago IP attorney, blogger and passionate proponent of Towel Day @cyberlaw

Thanks for the opportunity, Lance. I do know where my towel is! :)

  1. @cyberlaw thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @cyberlaw?
    I am Kevin Thompson, a member of the firm @davismcgrath in Chicago, IL. I am also a husband, father of 3 boys, and friend.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I practice Internet, copyright, and trademark law. I help many individuals & businesses with international trademarks too.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Our clients range from individuals to small & large businesses. We help them protect their most valuable assets online & off
  4. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those individuals and businesses?
    The hot topic is online defamation, with so many small businesses going online and getting unearned negative reviews.
  5. Imagine that’s a very big problem…. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    After “Hello”, I tell them that we work with them to provide the best service in the most cost effective manner possible.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    This year we helped a small local business protect its brand against a competitor, from C&D letter to lawsuit to settlement.
  7. Congrats on a great result! Why do your clients hire you?
    Clients hire me because they trust me, they know I can help them, and that I can do so without breaking the bank.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Trademark applications and clearance of new marks keep me busy. That’s typical, as brands need protecting in any economy.
  9. Indeed…. What’s the next big frontier of IP law? Who will be most affected by it?
    As we expand into more global markets, clients will need protection in more foreign countries as well as the USA. (1/2)
    Small and medium businesses will be most affected when their brands are already taken overseas and can’t be registered. (2/2)
  10. How well do current laws (eg DMCA) protect IP rights? Are additional protections needed? How is the law evolving?
    The DMCA works well for some copyright holders, but for others it is merely protection for an outdated business model. (1/2)
    Better codification of fair use would be appreciated to eliminate some of the judicial gray area. Changes are slow. :) (2/2)
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I help individuals and businesses protect their most valuable assets, both online and off.
  12. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    I joined Twitter in May of 2008. It took me a while to figure out Twitter, but now I love it. Tweetdeck helps. :) (1/2)
    My objectives are to build relationships and let people know of interesting articles in my field. Same obj. all through (2/2)
  13. You blog at Cyberlaw Central (http://bit.ly/adZ51o). Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    I write for those interested in the “big picture” issues of the Internet, how it affects us, and the law. It’s fun to write.
  14. It shows…. You also have a Facebook page for your blog (http://bit.ly/drHasy). What’s your read on Facebook for lawyers?
    Facebook has been an interesting experiment. I try to keep my personal profile separate from the blog’s page. (1/2)
    I like the advice from John Jantsch (@ducttape) – Facebook is one more outpost leading people to the blog. And me. (2/2)
  15. Makes sense…. What specific impact on referrals / client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    I’ve received some good referrals from lawyers who needed local counsel, knew me and knew we were cost effective. (1/2)
    I’ve also had happier clients who knew their lawyer was a real person who could strike up a conversation about #DrWho. (2/2)
  16. Again, makes perfect sense… Let’s switch gears: What’s the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The death of old bus. models. Biglaw vs Solo/Small Firms with Alt fee arrangements & providing more cost effective services.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Small firms/solos will dominate due to their ability to be cost effective in providing tremendous service to happier clients
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d be involved with computers in some fashion. Btwn undergrad & law school I worked in software sales for @UWDoit #badgers
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    Thks 2 #7habits, I know I want to be remembered as a human being who did his best for his family, his clients and the world.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I enjoy Sci Fi TV (#Dr Who, #BSG, #Firefly), reading, and playing with my boys. These days, lots of soccer and scouts. :)
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Hang in there! Remember you’re in a service industry, so serve the clients you have well. It’ll get better. (1/2)
    For those without clients, consider pro bono service to get experience. Try helping the #EFF, for example. (2/2)
  22. Our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    I tell them to read Outliers by @Gladwell, put in 1000 hours and be prepared when opportunity comes. And to have a towel. :)

Yes, I’m convinced that a towel is good to have on hand. Thanks very much for a great interview; I enjoyed it very much!

Thanks, Lance. It was fun! So long, and thanks for all the fish!

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@bcjb

September 9th, 2010

Brent C.J. Britton

Intellectual Property Lawyer

Shareholder, Gray Robison P.A.

MIT Media Lab Graduate

Author of Brent C.J. Britton blog

Today we’re tweeting with Florida intellectual property lawyer, U of Tampa adjunct professor and MIT Media Lab graduate @bcjb

  1. @bcjb thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @bcjb?
    @bcjb is loving husband, doting father, scientist, musician, speaker (overcooked ham), lawyer, entrepreneur, bon vivant
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    IP, technology transactions, venture funding, M&A. I help people start companies and keep their IP and contracts in order.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mostly entrepreneurs in tech startups, but also some large, worldwide companies. Almost always tech or media or art.
  4. An interesting mix (tech, media & art I mean). What’s the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    My top 3 legal issues: be honest in all things, audit your IP portfolio, use the most well-written contracts available
  5. What then do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    It varies, but we have to have a realistic conversation about legal fees. Innovators require nontrivial legal budgets.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I work for a large, Japanese co (cannot name it) that sends me around the country lecturing on legal risks…
    In 1996 I wrote one of the first website development deals for a large television network against Major League Baseball
  7. Sounds like interesting work…. Why do your clients hire you?
    I work to keep great reputation for high quality and customer service. Happy clients are best marketing.
  8. Indeed they do. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    I do both IP and corporate work. Currently the IP is vastly outpacing the corporate. Lots of patents; not a lot of M&A.
  9. How did your life as an engineer prepare you to help clients as an IP attorney?
    As a software engineer, I found the law to be a hackable, noisy, rule-based system. Contracts a little computer programs.
  10. That’s very interesting description of the law…. I like it. What’s the next big frontier of IP law?
    Tricky.
    Both patents and copyrights may need slight modifications to suit modern standards. Open source rocks.
  11. This one’s less tricky (maybe): how do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “I help people start new companies, products, and services. I’m where the new stuff comes from.”
  12. You blog at “Brent C.J. Britton” (http://bit.ly/a2PouT). What is your blogging strategy? How do you decide what to blog about?
    I have a blogging strategy? =] It’s totally random. I try to blog monthly, but often fail. Wish I could do better. Too bz.
  13. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    Early 2007 I think. Same objectives. Stay connected, entertain, educate.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    It’s kinda like asking what is impact of telephone. It’s how clients find me and talk to me now.
  15. You’re a shareholder in a 200-lawyer firm. How does your firm’s leadership view your active Web 2.0 participation?
    With cautious optimism.
  16. Hard to argue with results…. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Multi-jurisdictional practices. No one only has clients in a single state. I happen to be licensed in CA, NY & FL, but…
    …geographic locus is becoming less and less relevant to commercial and legal activity. Hard for lawyers to deal.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Fewer firms, more solos referring and exchanging work, lots of online-only atty-client relationships, more ADR, all online.
  18. The answer to this one might be obvious, but what would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I would try to make a living speaking, writing, starting companies of my own, and playing classical piano. =]
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As one who drank deeply of life, who made other people happy, and who loved his wife and kids beyond comprehension.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Family. I speak, write, start companies of my own, play classical piano. =] Also I am learning violin with my 3yo daughter.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    My heart goes out. Hang in there. Try to diversify your expertise. Do what you love.
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t borrow to pay tuition. Take Ethics. Skip class once in a while.

Smart advice. Thanks for the interview; I enjoyed tweeting with you very much.

The pleasure was entirely mine. But I am disappointed we did not out-trend #fatstrippernames. =]

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@douglassorocco

April 27th, 2010

Douglas J. Sorocco

Director and Shareholder, Dunlap Codding

Author of Phosita intellectual property law blog

Former Chairman, Board of Directors of the Spina Bifida Association of America

Today we’re tweeting with @douglassorocco, Oklahoma City IP attorney by day, crusading do-gooder by night

  1. @douglassorocco thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @douglassorocco?
    I’m a mashup of tech geek, chemist, patent atty, photog, woodworker, husband and father. Also passionate about volunteerism.
  2. Don’t think any interviewees have described themselves as “mashups” before…. Tell us about your law practice.
    It’s always interesting – I work with the most creative, eccentric, innovative and passionate people. My day is rarely dull.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    My clients are concentrated at opposite ends of the spectrum – either very large legacy companies or start ups…
    All are typically looking to disrupt status quo – either with new technologies, fresh innovations or wicked cool ideas.
  4. Interesting. And what’s the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Predictability and no surprises – law is never predictable and that is true in IP and tech law more than anywhere. Constant change…
    My goal is to be as solid as possible – no surprise bills, no surprise deadlines, nothing silly that would make life harder.
  5. Am sure they appreciate that. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    “It’s a partnership” and “How can I make you a hero?” – 2 things that convey my respect for what they do and my ultimate goal.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I represent @pictometryintl – the challenge of keeping up with fast paced technology and being a shepherd of their tech and brand.
  7. Sorry, distracted looking at @pictometryintl website…. Cool stuff. Why do your clients hire you?
    I give a damn and take respons. If I say it – I do it & keep my word. I am a real person with a life outside law. Approachable.
  8. What’s the next big frontier of IP law? Who will be most affected by it?
    Social media (what else?) – int’l enforcement. Virtual innovation. How does a constitutional principle evolve for Internet era?
  9. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Laying groundwork for end of recession – pinpoint focus on innovation and protecting it. Market differentiation…
    Not historically “typical” – but in this econ, a laser focus on deriving value from the innovation and & IP is big key component.
  10. Tell us about your work as Chair of the Spina Bifida Association of America. What was your greatest accomplishment?
    As an indiv born with spina bifida – truly rewarding to see young people growing up with hope for a better, more inclusive, life…
    From a policy perspective – increasing the knowledge of folic acid in decreasing incidence of spina bifida in U.S. & abroad…
    And making sure – every – woman of childbearing age knows to take that folic acid prior to conceiving.
  11. Kudos for your efforts. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I help protect reputations and creativity. I work with inventors to facilitate the transition from white board to marketplace.
  12. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    I believe it was in 2008 – although my tweets were sparse. Wanted to engage in the convo. Now – basically have same goal …
    …to engage and converse with people I would not otherwise come into contact with. My own global “brain trust”.
  13. Makes sense. You blog at Phosita (http://bit.ly/f6Oe (expand)). Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    Started 1/2004 – it is the “People” mag of IP info. Goal was to have fun – info, simple IP explanations, and snark. =)
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Significant – i.e., meeting people, developing long term mutual friendships, and a referral network of people I trust and trust me…
    Same as with a local “face 2 face” network – but everyone is spread around world. #ignitelaw talk about it http://bit.ly/aSdJvT (expand)
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    ~ 15% – a lot of support to our young professionals to do it – e.g., @emilyecampbell – supporting @igniteokc, @swokc etc.
  16. Time well spent…. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Pressure on “big firms” from smaller, regional firms – e.g., we can compete with coastal firms even though we are in OKC …
    okc’s low cost of living equals lower costs and our “real people” culture makes us enjoyable to work with…
    We do things big firms can’t b/c of their rigid structure. Our clients feel like we live across street and have “skin in the game”
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Different! =) Boutique firms and solo attorneys will be the envy of the profession – efficient , decisive counseling – no memos!
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Something in the arts –an architect or photographer. Maybe a cabinet maker etc. Useful or practical wares. =)
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I cared and left world with more than I took. I loved and was loved. I had a lot of fun and I had the biggest mancave in world…
    Finally – that I wore out my body and was on the last bit of energy when I waved goodbye!
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Sleep! I travel a lot (60%) – so, I enjoy my home time – reading, wrestling with toddler son, and a beer with my wife on our porch.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Do the unthinkable – if “is is always done this way” do it differently and promote the hell out of it…
    Clients are looking for the “wow” – be your own boss. Read folks like @nipper, @jmattbuchanan, @matthoman, @ipstrategist…
    They have struck out on different paths and created a place for themselves in the world. They provide value by being different.
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Read a business book! Nothing will be easy – and someone will do what you do or want to do for less and in a better way…
    If you treat law like any other business (innovate, client/customer service, good product, delight) you will succeed & be useful. =)

Great advice. Thanks very much for tweeting with me; I enjoyed interviewing you very much.

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@ksuzan

February 2nd, 2010

suzankKenneth D. Suzan

Partner, Hodgson Russ LLP

Trademark, Copyright and Internet Attorney

Social Media Blogger

Today we’re tweeting with trademark, copyright and internet, social media and new media law attorney @ksuzan

  1. @ksuzan thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @ksuzan?
    I am an explorer and an intellectual property attorney and help companies and brands protect their names worldwide.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I protect brands from all angles. Trademarks, copyrights, domain names, social media and all IP matters non-patent.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Large companies, start-ups, individuals – all seeking to protect, defend, license, and develop their IP portfolios.
  4. and what would you say is the single most important legal issue facing those clients?
    Acquiring and maintaining their exclusive rights in brand names, logos, slogans, and other brand indicia in the USA and worldwide.
  5. What do you say to every new client before you start working for them?
    I advise them of the process of obtaining IP protection including the estimated fees and costs for obtaining the protection.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I’ve protected a famous children’s dinosaur and his friends from infringement and dilution. The exhibits were memorable.
  7. Hmmm. I wonder which dinosaur that could have been…. Why do your clients hire you?
    Primarily to protect their IP; whether it be a new brand name, social media campaign or artistic work needing copyright protection.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    We have been filing many new marks; there are new products in the pipeline and it is important to file ITU trademark applications
  9. You’ve written on legal strategies in the age of social media. What do IP rights holders need to worry about most?
    Social media has the potential to make or break a brand; brand owners need to be proactive by using and monitoring these new tools
  10. How then can companies find the right balance between the risks of active social media engagement and the rewards it brings?
    Experiment wisely with multiple tools; Check your ROI on a monthly basis and view it in chart form; it is an evolving landscape
  11. What are your own social media strategy and objectives? How well are you meeting your goals?
    To tweet and post useful content on a regular basis. I also enjoy expanding my network of professionals throughout the world…
    I am meeting my goals. I have established connections with people and have developed valuable writing and speaking opportunities.
  12. How are your Web 2.0 activities perceived by your firm’s leadership? Are there others in your firm as active as you?
    That remains under review for the time being. However, I continue to tweet and have integrated Web 2.0 tools into my practice…
    Others in my Firm are embracing LinkedIn and Facebook, but I am probably the most active with Web 2.0 tools.
  13. If your clients are active in that space…. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    Think about the aisles in stores. There’s a trademark lawyer behind every brand on the shelf. Trademarks are part of life.
  14. A lotta lawyers…. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Many lawyers indeed!… Web 2.0 has yielded numerous requests and potential engagements from artists and brand holders
  15. That’s great to hear. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    My fiancee would say too much! — About 1 hour a day; from posting new content to reading and listening to the content of others.
  16. Sounds like it is time well spent…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Proper mentoring of the next generation of lawyers. Law school can only do so much for the newly minted lawyers.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Lawyers will meet clients in virtual spaces and we will have lots of case law where Web 2.0 evidence is deemed the “smoking gun”.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    A few things come to mind – TV newscaster, journalist or a teacher.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    A great leader, a trusted advisor and a loyal friend to many.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I enjoy travel, music, the arts, and reading. My next big trip is to Athens and the Greek Islands. I’m a photographer too.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Use Web 2.0 tools to make critical connections and use the time to coordinate personal goals and aspirations with reality.
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Think about ways to help others by serving your community. Our institutions need great thinkers!

That’s good advice. Thanks very much for sharing your thoughts and perspective with me today.

Lance, it has been a pleasure. Many thanks for this opportunity.

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@glennm

November 11th, 2009

glenn_soccomm09Glenn Manishin

Competition, intellectual property and policy advocacy lawyer

Partner, Duane Morris LLP

Author of Glenn’s Web and LexDigerati

Web pioneer and Web 2.0 legal guru

Today we’re tweeting with @glennm, biglaw antitrust / telecom / technology litigator turned Web 2.0 legal guru

  1. @glennm thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @glennm?
    Good morning . Thanks for inviting me.
    A tech atty. focused on comp. policy, IP & complex litigation. I help to shape the rules for new technologies, like social media.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    My practice has broadened over the years as technology developed, from telecom to software and Internet to mobility and content….
    It all started at DOJ during the US v. AT&T divestiture case, where I 1st combined antitrust with telecom regulation.
  3. That’s quite a resume! What type of clients do you represent?
    Clients who can pay their bills. ;-) Seriously, my clients range from start-ups to Fortune 100 companies. Hard 2 generalize.
  4. I can imagine…. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    “What am I?” Meaning, how will legislators, courts and regulators classify and treat our products and services. That affects…
    …business Qs like CRM, IP protection/licensing and relations with both partners and competitors.
  5. Sounds like fascinating work. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    “It’s better 2 be the windshield than the bug.” Be proactive in managing the development of law & policy affecting ur space.
  6. Am sure you’ve got some great success stories: tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    My fave is representing Netscape in 1995-96, when the FCC faced the Q of what was this new animal of the Net…
    …Netscape WAS the Internet and we inaugurated a federal policy of minimal regulation that survives (in large part) today.
  7. Wow. And we all thank you for that…. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m smart, fast and strategic. I would rather solve a problem with a conf. call than write a research memo. And I try to craft…
    …legal strategies for clients that further their long-term bus. plan rather than just dispose of “one off” disputes.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Over the past 2-3 years it’s been litigation. But the law moves in cycles, sometimes regulatory agencies r where the action is….
    …and at other times firms must act to resolve issues by taking them to the courts. We’re in the latter phase in tech now.
  9. What have been the biggest changes in your practice over the past few years? Clients? Technology? The Law?
    A move away from private antitrust litigation to intellectual property, as competition issues have become dominated by disputes…
    …over ownership of the underlying tech methods and assets. Take VoIP (voice over Internet protocol) for one example.
  10. What will be the next great legal battle of Web 2.0? Why should we pay attention to it?
    Who owns user-generated content is the big unsettled Q. It will impact users, social network providers and content creators…
    …If most or all digital content can b “shared,” how do older rules re proprietary rights apply in the new environment.
  11. You’re at an AmLaw 100 firm. How does your firm’s leadership view your active Web 2.0 presence?
    Mgmt. is supportive & has tasked me several times w/teaching our lawyers how to utilize and interact w/social media.
  12. That’s great. What do you say to lawyers who thumb their noses at social media and social networking?
    Hope they don’t thumb noses. But lawyers are conservative creatures and thus tend not to embrace change quickly…
    …I’d say that if attys. do not “get it,” they probably won’t get as many clients and work as new modes of communication develop.
  13. Your Web 2.0 presence is a mash-up of personal & professional. What are your SocMed objectives? Are you achieving them?
    I’m more concerned with satisfying a passion for early adoption than forming concrete objectives from social media. My philosophy…
    …has always been to find industries, partners and clients that excite me, so work is satisfying instead of a burden. The rest..
    …typically follows, namely success, profit and (we hope) happiness.
  14. Nice. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    I’ve been approached and retained by about 1/2 dozen clients in the past 12-18 months from social media contacts. The familiarity…
    …created by a user’s “social stream” tends 2 build closer relationships from the start than cold calls either way.
  15. Indeed. Can be a significant competitive advantage. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Discipline is key, else social media addiction can consume one’s life. I dedicate 30 mins, in the morning and then periodically…
    …review/post stories re current events (emphasizing law/policy, of course) of interest. Content is the best promotion.
  16. Seems to be working well…. Let’s switch gears. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    It’s clear that Big Law is facing its most challenging bus. environment in decades. Pressures to reduce and make fees predictable…
    …r sending shock waves of RIFs throughout the field. What will the bus. model be 4 legal servs. in the 21st century?
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Ah, if I could predict that, I’d be able to retire now. ;-) 20 yrs. ago I never imagined 3000+ lawyer firms, so I don’t…
    ..pretend to have a crystal ball on the legal landscape. Change can b both exhilarating and frightening, however.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Photographer or ski bum. Maybe there’s still time left? I could take a bluetooth headset 2 the slopes & do bus. in powder. .
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    Unless a person becomes historically famous, legacy is all about the memories one leaves with family, colleagues and friends….
    …So while I am not especially religious, I believe in “from dust to dust.”
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Law is a jealous mistress as the old saying goes. Time is a precious commodity in short supply. So on off hours I recharge my…
    …batteries, enjoy time with wife/friends and try to beat my freshman-year son in fantasy football (he’s going down!).
  21. What advice can you pass along to the increasing # of lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Quoting Jim Carville, it’s the economy, stupid. Do not equate self-worth with job prospects. Keep faith in urself & ur innate value.
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Enjoy being an atty., but remember most of lawyering is in small details. Master craft first before trying 2b creative.

Relevant advice Indeed. Thanks so much for tweeting with me today; I really enjoyed learning more about you & your practice.

And thanks much 4 the Twitterview, Lance. I’m honored to be your guest. Very early here (Calif.), so hope I was coherent.

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