@tsolignani

April 26th, 2011

Tiziano Solignani

Family Law Attorney

Blogger

Author of Guida alla separazione e al divorzio

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Today we’re tweeting w/ @tsolignani: Italian lawyer, writer, blogger, dad, geek, Apple user

  1. @Tsolignani, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Tsolignani?
    I was born in 1969 in Modena, Italy, where I currently live and work. I like to innovate the practice of law whenever I can
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  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    A small multipractice firm, with around 12 atty’s, located in the sorroundings of Modena, powered by Apple and Ubuntu pc’s
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  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Several. I like family law, but also traditional estate cases and generally matters where new technology is involved.
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  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Well, I guess you cannot find a single one. When hiring a lawyer, people would just like to know whether or not their …
    candidate could be able to handle their issues, which are always different, as a matter of fact …
    we don’t care so much about specialization: trying to be clever, brilliant and able to work together are better skills l
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  5. Interesting perspective. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Again, people just wanna know 3 things: whether you can handle their issue, how much time and money it’ll takes…
    So, this I what I usually tell them, then they have to accept my fee and other conditions and eventually we start…
    Whenever I can, most of the time, I do flat fees, so that people can exactly know the cost in advance. They like it.
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  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    The italian code of conduct forbid to mention people you worked for as a lawyer. So that I cannot tell names. But one …
    of the most interesting experiences I had was being expert witness before the Crown Court, in the UK, into an extradition…
    case requested by the italian government, where the court denied the extradition as for my advice
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  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    It’s up to them and it’s always different. Someone wants a «young» firm, someone else a lawyer one can email or DM …
    on twitter. Some others are Italian but live abroad and need a lawyer in the country. There really are many cases.
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  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    I guess family law and, yes, it’s typical, but, again, beware family could embrace every branch of the law: think …
    f.i. to a divorcing couple who owns a corporation whose main assets are intellectual goods; it’s a divorce, but you …
    surely would need to work with an IP lawyer.
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  9. Indeed. How has personal (family) law in Italy changed over past ten years? What do those changes mean for your clients?
    Not as much as the society did and there would be really many things to change. Other european countries, such as Spain…
    and France did the innovation we missed, f.i. in marriages, allowing homosexual couples, but there would be much more
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  10. And how is the legal profession evolving in Italy? Do you see similar challenges as we do in the US (eg fixed fees)?
    Unfortunately, the legal profession in Italy is not evolving at all: rather it is getting worse day by day, due to …
    several reasons, such as judiciary system inefficiency, huge numbers of practitioners and many others …
    fixed fees: a law was enforced about that and some laywers like me do fixed fees, but the most still do not
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  11. Change is hard everywhere…. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I know many lawyers create an «audio logo» to spend in such cases, but I prefer not to mention my work while partying …
    when someone insists, I talk about what I do, which is not necessarily the legal profession, but maybe a book or article
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  12. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    3 years ago. When trying some new «net toy», my aim is just to have fun and satisfy my curiosity. But I have to say …
    twitter later did the trick for me. I use it everyday, have fun and many a good clients found me over there
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  13. You blog at http://bit.ly/dUDVl1. Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    For the common people, not for other lawyers. They can read to understand some basic notion and principles of the law
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  14. You mentioned clients finding you on Twitter: can you quantify the new engagements you’ve got from Web 2.0?
    Well, it is far for getting near my core business but it is promising and worth keep working on it
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  15. Tell us about “Guide to Separation & Divorce.” It’s a difficult subject. How do you make it less so for your clients?
    If there’s something we lawyers exists for, if any, is explaining the law to common people in an effective way. We have …
    change our language and literally translate in simpler terms what we are used to think in a more complicated form, but …
    I guess it is worth it. A lawyer is a good one only if he or she can communicate with everyone and turn simple what is not
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  16. Very well put. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The fab 5? 1 get hired 2 do the work 3 get paid 4 try to save some money from bills and taxes 5 still keep smiling
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  17. :-) What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    We Italians live in an idle country where, when something changes, often gets worse. I have no idea, I just know I have …
    2 children and I hope neither of them gets to be a lawyer, there are many more funny and interesting things to do, as yet
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  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I adore writing and sometimes I think about trying some short stories or even a novel, but I do not think I ever will :-)
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  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a man with whom you could talk to and get some answer, some advice, some suggestion or even comprehension. A man who …
    helped someone, sometimes.
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  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    As of today, mostly playing with my children. But I like «creative idling» too and «practice» whenever I can
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  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    First off: choose whether you still want to practice or not. There are many other interesting things to do and where you …
    you can earn the same or even more money. If you decide to stay a lawyer, then prepare to do much more the marketing side
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  22. And our final question of the interview: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Try to get the best from the school experience and, once out, choose very carefully the career, maybe trying with stages

Very good advice, for both groups. Thank you for tweeting with us today; I enjoyed learning about you and your practice

I have learned so much too. Thank you for interviewing me. Have a nice day.

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@Aswsolicitors

January 25th, 2011

Fiona Reid

Litigation and Family Lawyer

Director, Ascroft Whiteside

Today we’re tweeting w/ @Aswsolicitors, litigation / family lawyer and director of a firm in Blackpool, UK

  1. @Aswsolicitors, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Aswsolicitors?
    a 35yr old business owner, wife and mum of a two year old
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  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    we act for private clients. We combine traditional values with a modern way of thinking and vision for the future
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  3. Tell us a little about the type of clients you represent. Who are they? What do they do?
    typically they are medium to high income working/retired individuals and businesses.
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  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    most certainly the value of their assets and safeguarding the value of their assets
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  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Litigation is costly but we can do as much or as little as you want us to and we can work together to help you budget fees
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  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    a client who bought a house suffered serious abuse from neighbour. seller of house made misreps on property info form  …
    saying no problems. important for client to recover monies to enable client to sell at reduced price and move away
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  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m down to earth, upfront, honest and play devils advocate. clients can see on http://www.ascroftwhiteside.co.uk/ that  …
    we are friendly and can even get to know us before instructing us
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  8. Indeed they can. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    our wills and probate dept is always our most active area due to our longstanding reputation and long estd Will dept
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  9. How have the economic challenges of the past few years impacted your clients? Are you seeing signs of recovery?
    Prior to 2008 residential and commercial conveyancing was booming and as you can guess, we took a big impact on those  …
    areas. we are now seeing a growth in both areas but slow growth and probably more sustainable
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  10. How are you transforming a 130+ year-old firm into “a forward thinking, creative, modern biz”? Why is that important?
    making new solid foundations, modern leadership, future online services + social media. Change is important because of  …
    imminent threats to legal profession. Hanging on to old ways is not an option
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  11. Speaking of change, let’s talk about Tesco law. What does it mean to your clients? To the legal profession?
    clients: more choice of provider. Legal Profession: Its a big wake up call. To some it’s doom and gloom. me? an opportunity
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  12. Nicely put re Tesco Law. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I say I’m a Solicitor. I then get told that I don’t look or act like one!
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  13. :-) When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    about 6 mths ago. Initially it was a trial and to learn how to use it. Now it facilitates my networking and part of routine
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  14. More broadly speaking, how important is social media and social networking to your firm’s marketing efforts?
    very It helps me keep in touch and make new contacts. also helps show that we are normal-not unapproachable and intimidating
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  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    yes. Mainly through Facebook. Had more contacts through Twitter rather than clients
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  16. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    the sad fact that soon we won’t be a “profession” – just one of a number of legal services providers
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  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    reduced number of high st firms. those still around will be focussing on niche areas and online service
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  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I can honestly say that business is my passion not being a lawyer so i would work on any business
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  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    as someone who inspired people to be who they want to be
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  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    spending time with my family, doing classes at the gym and reading
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  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    try not to be too general in the area of law you want to practise. Think:what’s going on in the country. how can you meet  ..
    those needs? finally, be positive!
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  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    there are a lot of doom mongers out there. Avoid them. If your heart is in law, stick at it. Be different, not a stereotype

That’s great advice. Thanks so much for the interview today; I really enjoyed learning more about you & your practice

Thanks Lance. Have a good evening ;-)

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@liquidluncher

December 7th, 2010

John Torrone

Family, estate planning and real estate lawyer

Partner, Jackson & Torrone, P.C.

Today we’re tweeting w/Massachusetts family, estate planning and real estate lawyer who enjoys running, food and beer @Liquidluncher

  1. @Liquidluncher, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Liquidluncher?
    I am a western MA native. I love eating. I am a beer snob. I run a lot of charity races to burn the calories from both.
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  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I am in Holyoke, MA. I have a general civil practice. Mostly family, guardianship, estate planning, probate & real estate
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  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I have mostly private clients with divorce/custody cases. I represent a lot of guardians. I love solving probate disputes
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  4. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    No one single issue but most have concerns for safety and well-being of loved ones. Many clients are in financial distress
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  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I tell them I will do the best I can. They make all the final decisions. I will fight hard for them to achieve fair and just
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  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    There are two (1) Iranian woman with custody dispute. If lost her son would return to Iran and she would never see him (2)…
    …(2) I worked on a MA Supreme Judicial Court case regarding child support with same sex couple who had child together
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  7. That sounds like challenging work. Why do your clients hire you?
    I have a good reputation for honesty and integrity. I have been described as a diplomatic bulldog. I truly look for fair
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  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Guardianship, estate admins and real estate. kind of typical. New Probate Code in MA. I am a bit of an authority on it
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  9. How has the economic crisis affected your clients? Are you beginning to see signs of recovery?
    It has. I do limited representation b/c people cannot afford me to handle their entire case. Not sure about recovery signs
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  10. Tell us about the Pro Bono Publico Award you received in 2009. What was it for?
    I received award from Bar for commitment to providing access to justice to low income people. I volunteer a lot at the Court
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  11. Clearly you take pro bono very seriously. What types of pro bono do you do? How does it make you a better lawyer?
    I volunteer to represent people. Provide free info seminars. I review Guardian reports for Court. I chair vol. lawyer group
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  12. That must be very satisfying…. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I usually tell people I am a problem solver and that I take care of people who need help before I tell them I am a lawyer!
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  13. :-) How do you generally market your practice? Does social media play a big part in your marketing efforts?
    most marketing is word of mouth. I use online marketing including social media to market. I do very little print advertising
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  14. How long have you been active on Twitter? Has your Twitter strategy changed over that time?
    About 6 mths. It has changed. Less direct marketing. It is more about maintaining presence and building relationships
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  15. Makes sense. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any referrals or client engagements?
    I have had several clients inquire about hiring me through Facebook. At least 1 from twitter. It is hard to track sometimes.
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  16. That’s a great result for your efforts. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The intermingling of politics in election of Judges. No elections in MA. Can’t make tough decision when job is on the line
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  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Probably pretty similar to now, except more online legal filing like in Fed Court. Probably many issues with privacy rights
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  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I can’t imagine doing anything else. I would probably move to Maine and become a lobster fisherman or start a brewery
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  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I want to be remembered as someone who was honest and always helped the less fortunate
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  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I run longer distances working up to ½ marathon. Usually 6-10 miles. I like trying beer I have never had and new restaurants
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  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    If you can afford to, keep working, even if you have to do more pro bono. There is a lot of Ct appointed work out there too
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  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    It is obvious that you need to work hard but equally important to learn how to market yourself and build relationships

That’s all very good advice. Thanks for tweeting with us today; was great to learn about you and your practice

No problem. This was a lot of fun! Thanks

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@Hideo_Kato

October 1st, 2009

photoHideo Kato (加藤英男)

Lawyer in Nagoya, Japan

Owner, Hideo Kato Law Office

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Today we’re tweeting with Nagoya, Japan-based lawyer @hideo_kato who also tweets in Japanese as @BengoshiKH

  1. @hideo_kato thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @hideo_kato?
    Apart from his job, 90% of his mind possessed by family and world peace☺, 5% by baseball, 5% by music.
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  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Bankruptcy of companies and persons, family law and speaking for clients companies in their troubles in general.
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  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    From medium & small-sized companies to ordinary people, mostly around Nagoya.
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  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    I may say it is in a word, “Default”. Broken contracts or promises damage and annoys them financially and psychologically.
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  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That is, “Tell me the whole story” ”Or I can’t give you a best practice.”
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  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    A man 1year older than I, he owns 5~6 companies & his business is expanding every year. He has been my client for ten yrs.
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  7. It’s very satisfying to help clients like that! Why do your clients hire you?
    Yrs ago they hired me just because I was fast. Now some of them from web kindly say they like me and trust me. My pleasure.
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  8. “Trust” is key around the globe…. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Bankruptcy and divorce. They are typical. I wrote a paperback for each subjects (altogether 2 books) 5yrs ago.
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  9. What will be the impact of the new government on the legal and regulatory environment in Japan?
    It’s said they might change their idea on producing 3000 successful examinees every year. But no big change, I suppose.
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  10. Change is hard, especially change like that. How do you market your law practice?
    I have HP, blog and ..Twitter! And I will write some paper backs again. I love ordinary people and small company owners.
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  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at networking events?
    Learning from people I meet, giving what help I can. Great thing is we are living on the earth now at the same moment.
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  12. You blog at kato_hideo.com (http://bit.ly/105R0n). Who is your blog written for? Why should they read it?
    For future clients to let them know abut me, and my clients to encourage them. I like writing about what I think & feel.
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  13. You have 2 Twitter profiles, 1 English & 1 Japanese. Do you post the same tweets or completely different messages? Why?
    Japanese one has the same purpose as my blog. English one has more, I mean to learn about what is happening in overseas.
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  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from your Web 2.0 activities?
    Focusing on how many cases I get, I say the number of cases I handle from web goes higher than from other routes.
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  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Actually I only can have time before going to bed or at early in the morning. So a half ~1 hour may be.
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  16. Time well spent if building your practice…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    We need to change, we serve clients first. Stop being a “Sensei”=arrogant teacher, and be a coach always with them.
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  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    May be we are going to trace the history of US lawyers in the past. Specialization, consoliditation of law firm may go fast.
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  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    If I can keep my experiences and knowledges, I would be a novel writer or statesman. If not, I ‘d be a cook of Japanese food.
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  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a person who gives clients a small hint or chance to make the history of their companies or to re-build their lives.
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  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I play baseball game for amateur folks or play with 5yrs old daughter. And, Tweet.
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  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    In an old American movie a guy said, ”Find your boss, or you be a boss yourself.” Believe in you, you can do it.
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  22. Wise words. What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Now 3 persons out of 10 pass in the bar exam but 3 times failures makes you expired. A narrow gate! Be strong and get it!

That’s great advice. Thank you so much for staying up late to answer our questions. This was a fabulous twitterview

Thank you so much for spending time for a local Japanese lawyer tweeting. I appreciate Mr. Lance Godard and kind staff.

Thank you all tweep again. Have a nice day. I will keep learning from you.

Thank YOU very much for your time and wise words. It’s exciting to learn about you and Japanese law practice via Twitter!

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