@michaelscutt

November 5th, 2009

michael_scutt2Michael Scutt

Employment law solicitor in the City of London

Partner, Dale Langley & Co

Author of Jobsworth, the employment law blog

Today we’re tweeting with solicitor and blawger @michaelscutt, who has a niche employment law practice in the City of London

  1. @michaelscutt thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @michaelscutt?
    I am Father, husband, cat-owner, blogger, solicitor, writer, Arsenal fan, gadget fan, cyclist, cook – in that order
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    We are a 2 ptnr niche full-service employment law practice. We give practical, cost-effective, jargon-free legal advice
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    employees of all levels of seniority mainly in banking, finance, legal and IT sectors but also SMEs and owner managed bizs
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Employees: 2 equal: redundancy and will I get a bonus? Employers: how to reduce costs without making redundancies
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    How much I charge, what my time estimate is, ask what THEIR ideal solution to their problem is and what I can do to help
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    An equal pay and bullying/harassment case involving senior female banker. We got a good settlement before trial
  7. Congrats to you and your client. Why do your clients hire you?
    Thx. Virtually all work gets referred to us by recommendation from previous clients, other lawyers, HR, contacts etc
  8. Nice recognition of your work! What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Thx. Advising on severance agreements, grievance /disciplinary procedures, employment contracts, restrictive covenants. Yes
  9. How has the economic crisis “changed the game” with respect to employment law? Has it changed for good?
    Clients are much more cost conscious and put fee estimates before any other qualities of their lawyer. Yes, it’s the future
  10. Interesting. How do you market your practice?
    word of mouth referrals (see above) networking in “real” world, journal articles, website, my blog, Linked In, Facebook
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at networking events?
    I say I’m an employment lawyer who can solve all their problems! Re: employment law of course! mainly I just try to listen
  12. You blog at Jobsworth (http://bit.ly/3mBjXo). What are your goals for the blog? Are you meeting them?
    Yes: it raises my profile and I’ve made some good contacts through it. No: conversion rate of enquiries 2 clients needs 2 improve
  13. Besides Twitter and your blog, what Web 2.0 tools do you regularly use to market your practice?
    I use our recently redesigned website http://bit.ly/u3R3w also Linked In and, sometimes, Facebook. Wikipedia is next.
  14. Intrigued re Wiki… What specific impact on referrals / client engagements have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    direct client engagement hard to say. Other contacts: great. I now lecture on Tesco law because of a referral via my blog
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Probably 1 – 2 hours per day average, mostly in the evenings and on train. Addict! My wife says she is an internet widow
  16. And now you’re online at 9pm for this…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    No worries. Kids have finally gone to bed! Undoubtedly the introduction of full legal deregulation …
    via external ownership of law firms in 2011 – so called Tesco Law. Many lawyers here only just waking up to it
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    V few generalist and fewer mid-size law firms, more small specialised law firms, few high st giants, more IT / virtual lwyrs
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    My wife says I’d be happy! Probably be in IT – as a social media consultant. At school I wanted to be a forester
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I think I’d just like to be remembered
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Look after and play with my 2 small kids, cook, write, go cycling/running, occasionally go out with my wife – in that order
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Don’t despair, be flexible, be imaginative, use social media to make contacts. Network!
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    2 things; (1) good luck and (2) Be humble; lawyers don’t have a god-given right to a living

Valuable advice. Thank you very much for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed learning about you and your practice.

I’ve really enjoyed it. Thank you very much for having me on your Twitterview.

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@eric_b_meyer

September 11th, 2009

3418977_1Eric B. Meyer

Labor and Employment Attorney

Associate, Dilworth Paxson LLP

Regular contributor to The Legal Intelligencer Blog

Today we’re tweeting with @eric_b_meyer, labor & employment lawyer & winner of the 610 WIP SportsRadio Midday Show Suicide Pool

  1. @eric_b_meyer, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @eric_b_meyer?
    Husband, recent father, L&E attorney, Philly-area native, sports nut (Eagles, Sixers, Bruins, BoSox – family is from Boston)
  2. Congrats on fatherhood! Tell us about your law practice.
    I’m an associate at Dilworth Paxson LLP in Philly where I counsel employers on labor and employment issues affecting the workplace
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Most of our clients are employers in the Mid-Atlantic (PA, NJ, DE) region that have 50+ employees
  4. What are some of the key legal issues now affecting those clients?
    Most common are issues involve sexual harassment, discrimination and FMLA. Employee use of social media is also hot now
  5. SocMed issues probably going to grow…. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Employment disputes have a tendency to get very personal. It’s ok to be passionate, but at the end of the day, it’s business
  6. Wise words…. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    1 of which I am most proud was a non-L&E pro bono case, helping a couple who bought a puppy mill dog take action against a kennel
  7. I hope you and they were successful. Why do your clients hire you?
    Chloroform & brainwashing ;). But seriously, I like to think I’m good at what I do, while providing great value for our clients
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice right now? Is that typical?
    Discrimination, sexual harassment & FMLA actions are generally plentiful. We are now seeing an increase in wage & hour disputes
  9. You write a lot about the Employee Free Choice Act. What does it mean to your clients? Where does it stand?
    #EFCA means a lot to our clients, especially those that are not presently unionized — it is an absolute game changer …
    I do not see #EFCA passing this year — Congress will have its hands full with healthcare. Maybe a watered-down version in 2010
  10. How has the economic crisis affected your clients’ ability to do business?
    Some of our clients are hurting. We’ve seen layoffs. We’ve seen bankruptcies. 2009 has not been the best of times for them
  11. I think everyone’s looking forward to the next economic phase…. How do you market your practice?
    because its viral, social media is great! Although, nothing can replace some face to face time, a handshake & good conversation
  12. You blog at The Legal Intelligencer Blog (http://bit.ly/p41HW). Why not start your own blog?
    There are only 24 hours in a day ;). @TheLegalIntel is so well known; I can just focus on blogging (rather than marketing)
  13. Makes a lot of sense. Why did you become active on Twitter? Are your goals still the same? Are you meeting them?
    Getting my start on Twitter just kinda happened. And I aimed low — I started last November w/ zero goals … I met them.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from your Web 2.0 activities?
    I’ve gotten many speaking engagements and have also become a recognized authority on #socialmedia issues affecting the workplace
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I use Tweetdeck at work and at home, so it’s constantly on for me. Actively, I probably spend an hour or two a day on Twitter.
  16. Let’s switch gears. What would you say are some of the most significant issues currently facing the legal profession?
    Finding ways to distinguish yourself from the field. For me, that means staying on the cutting edge, e.g., #EFCA and #socialmedia
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    What will the stock market look like in 10 years? I have no idea. Guessing, I’d say more emphasis on tech, less on billable hour
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I always wanted to be a sports agent (still do). More than likely, I’d be in financial services (a stockbroker, maybe)
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I want to be remembered as a great lawyer and an even better person
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    My 12 week old son, Brooks, dominates my life away from work (although my wife would tell you its fantasy football/baseball)
  21. What advice would you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Get out there and network like its your full-time job. Make contacts. Make contacts with your contacts. Be aggressive & persistent
  22. Our last question of the day: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    As explained to me many years ago, in the whole scheme of things, law school doesn’t count for much …

Thanks for having me

Thank YOU for a great twitterview! I really appreciate your thoughtful responses

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@tysonsnow

July 9th, 2009

bw-smallTyson Snow

Employment and labor litigation lawyer

Associate, Manning Curtis Bradshaw & Bednar LLC

Today we’re tweeting with Salt Lake City-based employment / IP litigator and self-described geek @TysonSnow

  1. @TysonSnow, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @TysonSnow?
    Despite the jokes, lawyers (even @ firms) are people–like us! I’m a husband, friend, goofy, reader, hopefully always smiler
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Litigation. Management side employment law. Harassment. Discrimination. Etc. Mix in IP & commercial lit. And I’m at a firm
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Employers & business owners; whether big or small. I litigate and consult on employment and/or IP issues they may have.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    The economy (obviously). Advice on managing workforces, payrolls, benefits, IP, etc, w/in massive state and fed regulation.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I’m a litigator; I tell the truth: litigation is hard, real hard, but often necessary. We’ll get there but it will tough.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    How about a few: national retailers (Wal-Mart / Sinclair / Smith’s / IHC) – crazy stories and crazy facts – fun cases.
  7. Hmm. Our collective curiosity is piqued…. Why do your clients hire you?
    We left a “big” firm 12 years ago. We do “big firm” work, but w/ better service, more interaction, & Utah billing rates.
  8. Makes sense. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Employment law, especially retainer clients; calls for advice & quick answers. More than usual. Also, more employees suing.
  9. You were News Director at BYU’s news outlet while in college. How does that experience make you a better lawyer today?
    Lots of ways: better at managing large volumes of info, delegating, working w/ people, & ensuring that the details get done.
  10. How do you market your practice?
    Sorry for delay — Partners… Sheesh… I do free employment & IP seminars , community involvement, networking, referrals.
  11. No worries. You blog at The Social Media Lawyer (http://bit.ly/RSvP4i). Why do blog about SocMed rather than labor law?
    My background = computer science. I’m a tech geek. I’m tech support around the firm. Tech / Social Media serve me & clients
  12. Play to your strengths… Besides Twitter and your blogs, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use?
    LinkedIn, Facebook, boosting my MH ranking – http://tr.im/g1u5 – helping clients use online solutions to solve problems
  13. Was it hard to sell your active Web 2.0 profile to your firm’s leadership?
    Our new site just up! http://mc2b.com – featuring pics by our attorneys! Yes, it was/is hard. Legal world is tech challenged
  14. Congrats on that! What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you seen from your Web 2.0 activities?
    Perceived expertise: I refer out more work (employees calling me) = more work (IP, employment, etc.) referred back my way.
  15. Sounds like the effort is paying off. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I spend a couple of hours/day developing my “brand,” legal knowledge, or touching base w/ friends & colleagues – aka playing
  16. Let’s switch gears. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Confluence & divergence. People now know more about law (need fewer lawyers) but law gets more complex (need more lawyers).
  17. Interesting perspective. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Similar to today. Same landscape (w/ firms) but new methods: Alternative billing. Boutiques. In-house attnys handling more.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    180 days: tram at Snowbird; 180 days: pro BMX park rider (or race Le Tour) I love writing/reading. Journalism most likely.
  19. Sounds like a good life! How do you want to be remembered?
    Hard ?: Good husband, father (some day), friend, always smiling/joking, nice to all (even plaintiffs). As a lawyer? Maybe.
  20. You’ve given us some hints already, but what do you do when you’re not working?
    I read depos in bed & dictate in my sleep. Read, ride, bmx, longboard, ski, music, watch Jeopardy (I’m a dork), church, etc.
  21. Busy man…. What advice would you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Your JD very versatile. You have skills all employers need. Pretend your job hunt = getting onto Law Review. Same intensity
  22. That’s a helpful perspective. Our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    My advice: enjoy it. My current best friends are law school friends. I met my patent-attorney wife in law school! … (1/2)
    … For 3 years, life is about law school, but ultimately, but the rest of life is about life. Enjoy it! (2/2)

That’s great advice! Thank you very much for answering our questions today

Thanks! I really enjoyed it. Everyone feel free to DM or follow-up w/ me if you want. Always happy to chat!

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@djillpugh

July 7th, 2009

green_jacket_crop_smiling__tilted_head_D. Jill Pugh

Seattle Employment Attorney

Law Office of D. Jill Pugh

Author of Employment Law Blog and Employee Handbooks blog

Today we’re tweeting with Seattle Employment Attorney @djillpugh, solo practitioner and author of 2 employment law blogs

  1. @djillpugh, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @djillpugh?
    <140 char?! Happily married atty passionate about empl law & helping others, my work is a calling, not just a job; animal lover
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Only do empl law; I don’t handle ERISA or workers comp; I do discrimination to unpaid wages to unemp ins to severance to noncompetes
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    About 75% individual employees; 25% small businesses. Litigation and plain ol’ negotiations.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Hard 2 pick. Most common right now is wrongful termination based on FMLA or maternity leave; non compete issues R on the rise
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Civil litigation is a slow process; be proud of yourself for sticking up for your rights, you are setting a good example
  6. That’s a positive message! Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Hard 2 choose! I’m proud of helping a woman with cancer get a good settlement for being fired for being ill
    her boss gave her a poor review b/c she “wasn’t who she used to be” before chemo (!!)
  7. That’s an amazing story; I imagine it validates everything you do…. Why do your clients hire you?
    Experiences like that are why I love what I do – it is absolutely worth the work
    They feel listened 2, feel understood & have confidence in my knowledge & legal skills; also usu. I was highly recommended to them
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Big increase in review of severance agreements (> than normal #s of requests); also increase in non compete issues.
    They are common areas, just a huge increase in traffic. Slow economy = busy employment lawyers!
  9. I’ll bet! You’ve been solo for nearly 8 years. Why did you make the leap? How long did it take to feel established?
    Ah, that’s a trick question; I was also a solo from 1996 to 1999, but needed better business management skills. (cont’d next twt)
    I had an all contingency fee case load the 1st time, hard to pay the rent that way!!
    I saw law firms were pyramid schemes; wanted control over choosing clients, cases, my time. At 3 yrs felt established – the 2nd time
  10. From the looks of it you’re doing it right this time. How do you market your practice?
    Thx! I market with my blog(s); personal face to face networking; speaking at CLEs; publishing articles; Twitter; Avvo; LinkedIn
  11. You mention your blogs: you have two on employment law (http://bit.ly/RrIti and http://bit.ly/SBu1R). How do they differ?
    The Employment Law Blog is primarily aimed at employees & the Employee Handbooks Blog is aimed at employers/business owners
  12. Why did you decide to become active on Twitter? Has it been worthwhile?
    Critical mass of folks I respect on the solomarketing listserve were singing its praises; it has definitely been worthwhile!
    Twitter is an infinite source of information, friends, networking – I love it!
  13. Besides Twitter and your blogs, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use?
    I keep Avvo profile updated & answer some questions there; try to be interactive on LinkedIn; active on several listservs
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you seen from your Web 2.0 activities?
    In the aggregate I think it has increased my referrals tremendously; no direct clients from the 2.0 activities
    Makes sense though, my best referral sources are other attorneys, HR professionals, CPAs
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    It’s not always conscious brand development, as a solo I am always “on”; but my timesheets reflect about 30 dedicated hrs per month
  16. Let’s switch gears. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Ok! One big issue is how does the profession move into the 21st century? Technology outpaces legal developments & not just emt law
  17. Indeed. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Hmmm; I think there will be fewer mega law firms; more personal interaction w/clients; hope technology will be tool not a weapon
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I always say I’d be a librarian! Archaeology is another love; or I’d be a professional animal sitter :-)
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a passionate skilled advocate who fought with integrity; who found time to mentor, and made time for family & friends
    Preferably *not* remembered as just as the crazy cat lady! ;-)
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not working? Er? I do find some time 4 Rock Band on the 360, Mariners games, knitting, scrapbooking, Wii Fit, and 2 much pop culture
  21. Good point… What advice can you give lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    My advice would be don’t give up hope; create an online presence even if unemp; find ways to be noticed and to be helpful, volunteer
  22. That’s helpful. We’re at our last question: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t take out student loans! Ha. Seriously? Learn the law stuff, but also learn 2 market (even if you don’t want to be a solo)

Excellent advice. This was a great twitterview; thank you very much for answering our questions today

Thanks for the invite! This was a terrific experience!

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@TradeSecretLaw

May 21st, 2009

gibson__scott_fScott F. Gibson

Member, Gibson, Ferrin & Riggs, PLC

Trade Secrets, Employment Law, Biotechnology, Commercial Litigation Lawyer

Author of the BiziBoom blog

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @TradeSecretLaw: business lawyer, counselor, adviser, adjunct professor of law and wannabe chef and baker  

  1. @TradeSecretLaw, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @TradeSecretLaw?
    Husband (22 years on 5/22), father to four great young people, son, brother, uncle, friend. Oh, and I practice law for a living.
     
  2. 22 yrs on May 22? Revealed in a 22 Tweets interview? Wow! OK, tell us about your law practice.
    Intangible assets are 75% + of the value of a business. I protect those assets from employee disloyalty, theft, unfair competition.
     
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    My Firm represents growing businesses & their owners. We help them preserve, protect, & promote their business and personal needs.
     
  4. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Failure to plan. Many problems we see could have been avoided by implementing prudent legal and business practices.
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I will always shoot straight with you, even when you would rather hear something else. We want to be your attorneys for life.
     
  6. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    In my first solo trial, I defended the Arizona Supreme Court on a claim of wrongful termination. Defense verdict.
     
  7. No pressure there…. Why do your clients hire you?
    We focus on building our credibility and perceived expertise. Clients feel comfortable that we know how to fix their problems.
     
  8. How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    We teach correct principles, help clients learn new skills, and make introductions. We help clients implement needed changes.
     
  9. What led you to return to school for an LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics?
    When I read about the program, I had a strong impression, “You need to do this.” My wife, partners, & friends supported my decision.
     
  10. Go with your gut, I always say… How do you help your clients meet their business and strategic objectives?
    We take a long-term view: understand the business, learn their personal objectives, & plan for the future.Then implement the plan.
     
  11. I’m sure they find that very valuable. How do you market your practice?
    Primarily referrals. We are moving into Web 2.0 marketing — press releases, blogs, websites, e-books, newsletters, e-mail, etc.
     
  12. You’ve begun to blog at BiziBoom (http://bit.ly/WEgBZ). Who is it written for? Why should they read it?
    BiziBoom is for people who want to build their business, but are caught up in the everyday routine. It helps them focus.
     
  13. What was your objective when you started blogging? Has it changed?
    Three-fold objective is unchanged: (1) provide useful info, (2) differentiate from competitors, and (3) satisfy my urge to write.
     
  14. Has blogging made you a better lawyer? How?
    Blogging helps crystallize my thinking, so yes it makes me a better lawyer. It also helps clients perceive me as a better lawyer.
     
  15. That makes sense. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Difficult to say. Usually about two hours per day, sometimes more
     
  16. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    Web 2.0 has helped us think differently about how we represent clients. It helps us focus on client needs and on cross-marketing.
     
  17. Interesting observation. Let’s switch gears: what’s the most significant issue facing the legal profession today?
    Lawyers need to think differently about how we serve clients. Focus on client needs, solve their problems, and provide value.
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Those who differentiate will prosper. Services are intangible and difficult to value. Give clients a reason to value your services.
     
  19. That’s great advice. We may already know the answer to this, but what would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Business fascinates me. I love learning, writing, and teaching.
     
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    A man who lived his religion, loved his wife and children, and treated everyone honorably and with kindness.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Time with family (especially my wife) is the best. I enjoy reading, writing, sci-fi, sports, cooking, baking, and traveling.
     
  22. The baking intrigues me… Last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Focus on a practice area and become a recognized expert. Differentiate yourself to clients, referral sources. Learn how to market.

That’s great advice. Thank you very much for answering our questions today

Thank you for the invitation, @22twts. I have enjoyed the experience.

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@jayshep

April 7th, 2009

jay-shepherdJay Shepherd

Employment Litigator

CEO of Shepherd Law Group

Author of Gruntled Employees and The Client Revolution

Father, husband, and diehard Red Sox fan.

Today, we’re tweeting with @jayshep, a nationally recognized employment lawyer and founder of a firm that does not bill by the hour

  1. @Jayshep, thank you for joining us today at 22 Tweets. Who is the person behind @Jayshep?
    In order: father, husband, brother, son, entrepreneur, fixed-fee evangelist, lawyer, writer, Red Sox fan.
     
  2. Sox get last billing, eh? It’s early…. Tell us about your law practice.
    Shepherd Law Group in Boston. Protects employers from other lawyers. Lowers workplace costs. 11 years, 4 lawyers, more fun.
     
  3. What type of employers do you represent?
    Fortune 1000 to tiny startups. Our clients care more about the value they receive than about an office in Prague.
     
  4. What is the most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Disgruntled employees sue. Employers need to care more about having gruntled employees, and less about policies & rules.
     
  5. Interesting perspective. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    We don’t charge you for our time or work. We try to solve a problem, and we charge for the value that service has for you.
     
  6. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    We’ve helped many billion-dollar-plus co’s. But most significant? The 6 startups we kept from being shut down.
     
  7. Can you tell us about one of the start-ups you saved?
    Competitor was trying to use noncompete injunction to kill my client. Beat them in court. Still in business years later.
     
  8. That’s a great story. Why do your clients hire you?
    We don’t seem lawyerly. We come across more businesspersonly. Plain English, business-focused answers, no billable hours.
     
  9. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
    More people losing jobs = more ill will = more people suing = higher workplace costs = vicious circle.
     
  10. How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    Litigation problems mean uncertainty. Not telling clients how much it will cost would mean more uncertainty. We tell them.
     
  11. I’m sure they appreciate that. How do you market your practice?
    Twitterviews, naturally! Blogging, writing, speaking, meeting people, bar associations, CLEs. Being of value, or trying to.
     
  12. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Seemingly every waking moment. Easily a solid 3 to 6 hours each day, 7 days, 364 a year (except Opening Day — d’oh!)
     
  13. What value have you seen from being on Twitter?
    Big increase in traffic to my blogs. I’ve met many top legal innovators (http://sn.im/f212i) in 3 short months.
     
  14. You have 2 blogs, Client Revolution (http://bit.ly/sNtwD) & Gruntled Employees (http://bit.ly/95kd) Who should read them?
    Client Revolution (http://bit.ly/sNtwD) is for law-firm clients (and their lawyers) who think old model is broken …
    … Gruntled Employees (http://bit.ly/95kd) is for employers, managers, HR, and in-house counsel wanting fewer lawsuits.
     
  15. Has blogging made you a better lawyer?
    It has. Over the past 30 months, I’ve better formulated my philosophy and strategies into something clear and consistent.
     
  16. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    Increasingly, as I improve at them. The 2.0 stuff is giving me credibility and notoriety, getting attention of prospects.
     
  17. Switching gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Hourly billing, overpaid associates, legalese are killing it. BigLaw is like GM, newspapers, record co’s. Change is coming.
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    One-stop firms down. Business-oriented niche firms charging for value of bespoke services up. The Long Tail of law.
     
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d create and run another business. I’d write and speak more. I’d work to change another troubled industry.
     
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    “He took a risk, stood up for something, challenged authority, and made a difference. But he was still a nice guy.”
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    My most important job: father to the loveliest, sweetest 2 little girls. Also, watch the Sox. And try to figure out “Lost.”
     
  22. Can anyone figure out “Lost”? What do two employment lawyers talk about over dinner?
    People think my employment-lawyer wife and I talk about employment law. As if. We mostly talk about the kids. (And “Lost.”)
     
  23. Our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Two words: informational interviews. Meet many people. Don’t send blind résumés. Sell your differentness. And don’t panic!

[Ed. note: like @lawyerben, @jayshep got an extra question due to editorial oversight….]

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