@DavidMorganLLB

June 23rd, 2011

David Morgan

Employment Lawyer and Accredited Mediator

Partner, Burness LLP

Today we’re tweeting with @DavidMorganLLB, UK employment lawyer, accredited mediator, and one of The Lawyer’s Hot 100 for 2010

  1. @DavidMorganLLB, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @DavidMorganLLB?
    Hi. I’m an employment law partner and head of the dispute resolution department @BurnessLLP. I’m an accredited mediator too.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @BurnessLLP is a full service commercial law firm with offices in Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mainly large employers UK-wide. Commercial and public sectors. We’re big in media, retail and leisure
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Challenge of keeping up-to-date with developments in a fast-moving field: Age discrimination and retirement are hot topics
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I ask to visit their workplace for a tour. It’s so important to understand how their staff work, so I can shape my advice
  6. That makes a lot of sense. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I defended an employer from protective award claims following redundancies. Value circa £1M (Big for #ukemplaw!) 1/2
    2/2 There were multiple union-backed claims. High stakes. We successfully resolved them at judicial mediation in London
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m told responsiveness and client focus sets us apart @BurnessEmplaw. Relationships are important to #HR professionals
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    2 years ago – redundancies. Last year – Tribunal claim surge. This year – more positive: projects, training and deal support
  9. How is social media affecting employer / employee relations in the UK? Is the law evolving in response?
    Most clients now embrace it. But, for some, still a fear-factor as #HR see how it can go wrong by employee misuse at work
  10. Indeed. Your firm is part of the Employment Law Alliance. What does that mean for your clients? For your firm?
    Hugely important. ELA gives us a global reach to ‘best in breed’ employment lawyers around the world ~ http://t.co/6uA2D8K
  11. How has the economic crisis “changed the game” with respect to employment law? Is it changed for good?
    Redundancies etc. raised the profile/ importance of our practice area. UK Govt now proposing employment law reform 1/2
    2/2 Flipside is (as in other practice areas) economics mean that clients are managing legal spend and doing more themselves
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “I’m a job law expert”… That usually gets the party started! *sarcastic tabloid face*
  13. :-) You recently began blogging @ Defero Blog (http://bit.ly/kwo8Ye). Why did you start? Are you meeting your goals?
    Yes. I find the style of blogging liberating: colloquial and great way to get your personality across in opinion pieces
  14. Besides blogging and Twitter, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use to market your practice? How effective are they?
    I’m a major proponent of LinkedIn. I run a LI Group for #HR professionals ~ http://t.co/JY48bYm >400 members and rising!
  15. Congrats! Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Yes. My team and I have picked up 5 new client instructions thru LinkedIn. @BurnessLLP uses Twitter to recruit too 1/2
    2/2 And we launched a free Social Media Policy initiative thru the LI Group. Sent this to >100 new contacts/ target clients
  16. Innovative use of LI. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Thanks. Tackling the competing interests of a diverse age demographic and addressing work/life balance and flexible working
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Competition from external investment in BigLaw via ABS. More knowledge sharing amongst profession & clients. Virtual offices
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I grew up in Bermuda, so maybe something in shipping or insurance. Oh … or a superstar DJ ;-)
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    “Scotland’s leading employment lawyer” #noplaceformodesty #RIP
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    My 2 young kids keep me on my toes most of the time! + I’m a huge reggae fan (esp. 70’s/80’s roots, dub and early dancehall)
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your skills fresh with research and pro bono. Train in mediation and negotiation skills.
  22. That brings us to our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Law isn’t everything. Learn about business and soft skills – presentation, negotiation (& sales!)… Enjoy being a student!

That’s useful advice. Thanks very much for the interview today. I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice

Thanks Lance. I enjoyed it too. Great format. Thanks for giving me the platform.

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@ljanstis

May 24th, 2011

Laurie Anstis

Employment Law and Business Immigration Lawyer

Associate at Boyes Turner

Author of the legal blog Work/Life/Law

Today we’re tweeting UK employment and business immigration lawyer, blogger, podcaster and budding drummer @ljanstis

  1. @ljanstis, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @ljanstis?
    Thanks Lance. I’m mainly an employment and business immigration lawyer in the @btemplaw group of @boyesturner
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @boyesturner is mid-sized commercial firm based in Reading, and won Best Regional Firm in last year’s British Legal Awards
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mainly mid- to large-sized employers
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Last year: legal (and expected) for employers to force employees to retire at 65. This year: it’s not. That’s a big deal.
  5. Indeed. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Usually how to spell my name. It doesn’t bother me, but I get asked it all the time.
  6. First time I’ve seen that answer…. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I acted for employee in one of the first UK whistleblowing claims. He won >£250k, one of largest ever awards in those days
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m experienced, practical, committed to their work, and I don’t pick fights for the sake of it.
  8. A good trait to have… What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Women claiming equal pay with men (or the other way round). Not typical, but big over the past few years
  9. Does the need for UK biz immigration practice get smaller as EU gets bigger? How is your practice evolving due to that?
    No. New member states typically have some kind of restriction on movement of workers for a transitional period …
    … plenty to advise on there. Current gov policy is anti-biz imm and makes it difficult to get good results for clients.
  10. You spent time in-house before moving into private practice. What does that experience mean for your clients today?
    It means I know that legal problems can often be overcome by looking at the practical issues.
  11. Interesting perspective. What’s it like sitting on the other side of the bench, as a part-time employment tribunal judge?
    It’s harder work than it sometimes looks to a tribunal lawyer – but good to be able to see both sides of the story.
  12. I image that’s helpful to you and your clients. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “Employment lawyer” is usually enough.
  13. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    Just over a year ago – on the basis of trying it and seeing what happens. That’s still the plan for now.
  14. You blog (Work/Life/Law: http://bit.ly/dQZzMJ) and host podcasts for your firm. Who are they for? Why should they care?
    Blog – for anyone interested in emp law. They should care because there are some interesting posts (and comments) there …
    … Podcasts – for busy HR managers. They shld care b/c its a free & easy way to keep up to date, and sometimes entertaining
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Referrals – yes. Engagements – occasionally.
  16. Nice that it’s paying off. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    How to respond to competition from people or organisations who don’t hold traditional legal qualifications.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Most legal services delivered by large organisations, with a few smaller firms in specialised niches.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    *long pause* I’d sort of like to be a cook/chef – but only on certain defined conditions that bear no relation to reality
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    Aaaaaargh – I have no idea *immediately books long retreat to find purpose of life*
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not much at the moment, but in quieter times I grow fruit and veg and play guitar
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your knowledge and skills up to date by working on voluntary/pro bono basis (e.g. http://www.thefru.org.uk/)
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Make sure you have more than just a legal qualification to offer potential employers – e.g. biz experience, language skills

Great advice. Thanks very much for tweeting w/me today. I enjoyed learning about you and your practice

Thanks Lance – its been fun.

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@humanracehorses

February 23rd, 2010

Harold Goldner

The Law Office of Harold M. Goldner

Author, HumanRaceHorses blog

Second Oboe in the Lansdowne Symphony Orchestra

Today we’re tweeting with employment lawyer @humanracehorses, who may well be the first 22 Tweets interviewee to play the oboe

  1. @humanracehorses thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @humanracehorses?
    I solve workplace issues for employees who have been treated unfairly & for employers looking to improve their workplace.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Mix of employment discrimination claims & defense work; human resources; w/a smattering of PI and estate work here & there.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Big mix on employee side; on employer side, clients tend to be businesses where the bookkeeper is still the “HR director”
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    People spend about half their waking hours at work; if there are going to be conflicts, they’re likely to be on the job.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    If you hire me, you get me, not a lower level associate. I am much easier to reach by email (or Twitter!) than by phone.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Settled 2 cases alleging race, gender and retaliation against an airline. Came very close trial on the 2nd case.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I ask the “Harry Potter” question at the very first consultation. “If I were a wizard, what could I do for you” (cont’d.)
    I make my focus getting what the client wants; not what I might want if I in their shoes. It’s all about the client.
  8. Indeed. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Retaliation claims are big now. E/ees are aware of their rights & more likely to complain about discrimination.  (cont’d.)
    Also handling several non-competes where departing employees looking to be freed up to find better positions.
  9. How has the economic crisis changed the relationship between employers and employees? Are the changes permanent?
    For now employers have upper hand; employees are desperate to keep jobs even under bad conditions. Benefits more important. .
  10. What’s the next big battleground of discrimination in the workplace? How will it be resolved?
    1) Gender identify/affinity; acceptance of LGBT issues. 2) More anti-retaliation and whistleblowing laws.  (cont’d.)
    3) Genetic information. 4) Leave policies. As baby boomers age, more expansive family leave protection will be needed.
  11. Looks like conflicts to continue a while… How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I solve employment & workplace problems, or as I like to say “We take the heartache out of HR”.
  12. You blog at Human Racehorses (http://bit.ly/cYQlbm). What are your blogging objectives? Are you meeting them?
    Much of my work comes from other lawyers; I think (at least I hope) the blog helps raise my “brand awareness.”  (cont’d.)
    I try to focus on the quality of my blog posts rather than the frequency. I hope that’s not a mistake. It shouldn’t be.
  13. Agreed. Besides your blog and Twitter, do you use other Web 2.0 tools to market your practice? Which ones?
    I answer lots of questions on Avvo (http://is.gd/90y5A) & “My Employment Lawyer” (http://is.gd/90ygi). I’m on LinkedIn too.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Neither LinkedIn nor Facebook generate any business (I don’t use FB that way); Avvo has generated several paying clients.
  15. Congrats for that! How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Not enough. I try to blog more often. I’d like to do a podcast. But I try not to ‘waste’ my tweets.
  16. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    You can’t be a worker bee without clients any more. Without a clientele, you are soon to be or are already unemployed.
  17. Interesting perspective. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    1) Expanded use of referral networks for solo/small firms; 2) Diminished use of billable hour  (cont’d.)
    3) More virtual versus in person clients. 4) More of a national or regional practice than archaic state-based model.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Playing in an orchestra or band (I play alto sax & piano, too). Writing; composing. Maybe studying/teaching Shakespeare.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    My role model is George Bailey of “It’s a Wonderful Life.” I’d like to be remembered as somebody who helped others.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Listening or playing music; playing tennis; walking or hiking. Reading (at least when I’m on vacation). Watching soccer.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    a niche or expertise and be really good at it. Find clients you can help. Everything else will follow. Avoid mediocrity.
    Last answer, I mean FIND a niche…..  (thank Twhirl for the unwanted edit.)
  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Be sure it’s what you *really* want to do. Expect to find fulfillment outside of law practice – it’s a jungle out there.

That’s good advice. Thank you for the twitterview: I enjoyed it very much.

Likewise; thanks for the opportunity to chat. Keep up the good work. I look forward to your future “Twitterview.”

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@rushnigut

February 5th, 2010

Rush C. Nigut

Iowa Business Lawyer

Shareholder, Brick Gentry P.C.

Author of Rush on Business

Today we’re tweeting with Iowa business, franchising and employment lawyer @rushnigut

  1. @rushnigut thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @rushnigut?
    Thanks for the opportunity. My son says I am a “lovable, sporty guy, that can’t cook.” That’s a direct quote.
  2. Hmmm. Tell us about your law practice.
    I’m a shareholder with Brick Gentry, P.C., a 25 person law firm in West Des Moines Iowa. I’m primarily a business lawyer.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I represent a wide range of business clients as outside general counsel and handle business litigation cases.
  4. And what is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Employment claims and lawsuits are the number one issue faced by most of my business clients.
  5. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I represent Lloyds London in defending a $100 million claim to pay for the clean up of old manufactured gas plants in Iowa.
  6. Significant indeed…. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I am not going to bill you for each and every phone call. If you have a problem, call me. Clients can’t be afraid to call.
  7. Smart policy. Why do your clients hire you?
    I hope they recognize I am passionate about going above and beyond to provide value and obtain excellent results.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Currently business litigation is taking up most of my time. Not typical but may be this way for a while.
  9. What major regulatory changes can your clients expect from the Obama administration over the next three years?
    I am hopeful his recent $30 billion small business loan proposal spurs employment and growth with business clients.
  10. How has the economic crisis affected your clients’ ability to do business? How are they adapting to survive?
    Many business clients are really struggling to obtain credit and funding. They cut costs at every corner. It’s rough.
  11. Let’s talk about your marketing efforts. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    It’s better to be interested than to be interesting. I try to focus the conversation on the person I am talking with.
  12. You blog at Rush on Business (http://bit.ly/9U5YNy). What are your blogging objectives? Are you meeting them?
    I provide info about business legal issues in an easy to understand format. I want to improve the image of lawyers. It’s working.
  13. How are your Web 2.0 activities perceived by your firm’s leadership? Are there others in your firm as active as you?
    My firm is incredibly supportive. My success has helped. Others aren’t as active as me but a couple are blogging routinely.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    It’s been amazing! Too many referrals to count over the past 3-4 years. The blog has helped to elevate my reputation.
  15. Congrats for that. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Recently not as much due to the demands of certain cases. But I usually try to spend an hour or so each day.
  16. Sounds like you’re getting real ROI for it. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Accounting firms beating law firms to the punch. Business lawyers need to develop methods to serve clients more effectively.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Lawyers from nimble boutique firms will have the most success. Intellectual property law will continue to explode.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’m looking to take Tony LaRussa’s job if he doesn’t win the World Series so there’s still a chance I’ll be a MLB manager.
  19. Good luck with that! How do you want to be remembered?
    That I was a positive role model for my children, loved my wife and gave it my all in my endeavors.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I spend time with my wife and kids. I coach baseball and football. We’re home bodies on the weekends with no games.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Think creatively. A law degree is useful in many ways besides practicing law. Explore options outside a law practice.
  22. And our last question for you today — what advice do you have for people going to law school now?
    Consider your reasons for going to law school. Is it to make lots of money? You might be sorely disappointed upon graduation.

Wise advice…. Thanks very much for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice.

Thank you very much for the interview today. I enjoyed it! Keep up your great work.

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@dancanon

December 17th, 2009

fl000006Dan Canon

Clay & Adams, PLLC

Employment and civil rights litigation attorney

Author, Conflicts Check law blog

Today we’re tweeting with @Dancanon: employment and civil rights lawyer, musician, yogi, cancer hater and more

Hi tweverybody.

  1. @Dancanon thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @Dancanon?
    One of the guys I practice with is always calling me an evil genius. The “evil” part is a fair cop, so I’ll go w/ it.
  2. Could be worse, I suppose…. Tell us about your law practice.
    Mostly civil rights litigation, mostly plaintiff-oriented. Lots of race & sex discrimination, lots of 1983 cases.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    We try to stick with the little guy: individuals, some small businesses, the underdog. Good for the conscience.
  4. Good for those individuals, too, I’d wager. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Generally – abuse of authority and/or the sheer ignorance of people often in charge of your job, housing, freedom, etc.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I’ll do my best, but no guarantees. (And if you hear guarantees from a lawyer, run.)
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Probably this one, which is still going: http://chronicle.com/article/Judge-Orders-U-of-Louisville/47925
  7. Wow. That’s significant indeed. Congrats on the win. Why do your clients hire you?
    You’d have to ask them. I think I’m pretty down-to-earth, reachable, & I try to explain risk/benefit every step of the way.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Unemployment. Also some really bad race discrimination cases right now for some reason. Not typical. ADA & sex cases more common.
  9. Is unemployment the biggest challenge your clients facing due to economic crisis? How are you helping them get through it?
    Yes, I think so. I try to work on a contingency-fee basis as much as possible. Ppl w/o jobs simply cannot pay $xxx.xx/hr.
  10. Indeed. How do you market your practice?
    Not very well, I’m afraid. But hey, there’s this interview, so *someone’s* heard of me…
    But seriously, I’ve been fortunate enough to be involved in some kinda media-hyped stuff, so that helps.
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    Usually just say “I’m a civil rts lawyer.” Most ppl get that, and don’t immediately hate you like if you say “trial lawyer.”
  12. Hadn’t thought of that. You blog at Conflicts Check (http://bit.ly/7VH8hH). Who do you write for? Why should they read it?
    I dunno, still trying to find my legs w/ that thing. I just hope I’m writing stuff that is relevant to someone, somewhere.
  13. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you regularly use to market your practice?
    Just Facebook, I guess. I’ve been trying to get a @ProjectAiko as a receptionist, but I don’t know if that counts.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    I’ve had a lot more opportunity to let people know what I do. So, of course, you’re more likely to get the right clients …
    I’ve tried to run a really transparent practice, letting tweeps know what kind of cases I’m working on, etc.
  15. A sensible approach for sure. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I know Twitter lawyers are all into that, but who has time? Practice cases right, let ppl know what you do, & they’ll come to you.
  16. Let’s switch gears. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    No idea. It probably has something to do with the @btannebaum and @nikiblack feud.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Probably even more confusing, because there’s a big technology gap that is widening. …
    Hopefully more state courts will do online filing, but that can be bad for luddite lawyers, and there are lots of them.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Worry less, but probably beat myself up about not doing something more meaningful.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I’m not prepared to answer that, but I hope I’ve got a few decades to think it over.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Always have been a musician. Teach guitar. A little theatre. Drink lots of coffee. Beat myself up for not working enough.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Use free time to develop a niche, & tell ppl about it. But go after something interesting, not just lucrative. #clicheadvice
  22. And finally, our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t go unless you’re sure you want to practice. And try to be nicer than I was. I was grumpy the whole time.

Solid advice. Thanks for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed it.

Thanks for having me!

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@FLSALawyer

December 8th, 2009

n20206529_30822158_8580Walker Lawrence

Chicago-based Employment lawyer

Associate, Maduff & Maduff, LLC

Today we’re tweeting with labor & employment lawyer @FLSALawyer, who also tweets as @gourmetlawyer

  1. @FLSALawyer thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @FLSALawyer?
    I am a pssionate individual w/ a drive to help people. I love to cook, and learn something new everyday.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Civil rights firm in the emp. sector. We do everything. Inc. contract negotiations 4 execs 2 collective action litigation
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Ranges from 7-figure executives to blue color, on the line, steel manufacturing workers.
  4. That is a broad range of employees. What is the single most important legal issue affecting them?
    Job security & being pd wht they R owed; Some emp. believe it is more cost effective 2 break the law, rather than follow it.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Litigation is a long, hard process. I expect every client to work closely with me to achieve their goals.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    We represent over 750 employees at US Steel in Gary Works seeking unpaid wages. We just defeated SJ. We hope to go national.
  7. Good luck with that. Why do your clients hire you?
    We’re experienced, diverse, friendly, & client goal drive. We adapt & provide affordable options 2 meet needs.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Severance negotiations and non-competes are more active than usual. Unpaid wage actions continue to be a trend as well.
  9. How is the evolution of the workplace changing the legal status of the employee / employer relationship?
    It’s becoming less of a partnership. Emp. R look 2 stretch the boundaries at ee’s expenses. Need 2 work tgthr. (cont) …
    … A happy employee is one that will be much more productive and cost less in the long run.
  10. How do you market your practice?
    Significant online presence, large network of similarly minded attys, and word of mouth
  11. And how do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I help employees get paid what the law says they should.
  12. You also tweet as @GourmetLawyer. Why two accounts? How do your tweets differ?
    W/ ths acct I’m focusing on my professional, lawyer side. My other acct lets me explore my other interests w/o interfering.
  13. How does your firm’s leadership view your active Twitter presence?
    Good & bad. There’s some concerns, but it’s all about being open and frank about it. It’s a good thing.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    I’ve received clients from fantasy gaming friends and a few other attys on the web (cont…)
    I’m in a unique biz where literally every1 is a potential new client, both those employed and not
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    15/30 mins a day. We’re in the process of developing a more interactive updated website.
  16. Sounds like good ROI for your efforts…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Imo, atty conduct. So much money is wasted b/c of a ridiculously mindless and pointless atty bickering.
  17. Interesting perspective. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    More online filing. More attys crossing state lines as legal issues become more national. Possibly a federal bar.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d own and cook in my own espresso bistro on the streets of northern Italy
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I want everyone I meet to leave knowing I made a difference, no matter how small.
  20. I’m guessing I know at least a partial answer to this one…. What do you do when you’re not working?
    haha, i bet u cn. Cook w/ my wife. Prepare 4 ou new baby. I luv just being w/ my wife, family & friends w/ gd food & wine.
  21. I knew it! What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Be diligent, work hard. Never give up. Network. The attys getting jobs typically know the people that are hiring them.
  22. And our last question for you this afternoon: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Treat law school like a job. Set a schedule so you can get all your work done (e.g. 10 hour days, 5-6 days/wk). Don’t stress

That’s good advice. Thank you very much for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice.

A huge thanks and to @22twts and @lancegodard for the opportunity to participate in this unique and gratifying twitterview.

Congrats too on the baby news — one more demanding client on the way….

Ain’t that the truth.

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