@rushnigut

February 5th, 2010

Rush C. Nigut

Iowa Business Lawyer

Shareholder, Brick Gentry P.C.

Author of Rush on Business

Today we’re tweeting with Iowa business, franchising and employment lawyer @rushnigut

  1. @rushnigut thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @rushnigut?
    Thanks for the opportunity. My son says I am a “lovable, sporty guy, that can’t cook.” That’s a direct quote.
  2. Hmmm. Tell us about your law practice.
    I’m a shareholder with Brick Gentry, P.C., a 25 person law firm in West Des Moines Iowa. I’m primarily a business lawyer.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I represent a wide range of business clients as outside general counsel and handle business litigation cases.
  4. And what is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Employment claims and lawsuits are the number one issue faced by most of my business clients.
  5. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I represent Lloyds London in defending a $100 million claim to pay for the clean up of old manufactured gas plants in Iowa.
  6. Significant indeed…. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I am not going to bill you for each and every phone call. If you have a problem, call me. Clients can’t be afraid to call.
  7. Smart policy. Why do your clients hire you?
    I hope they recognize I am passionate about going above and beyond to provide value and obtain excellent results.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Currently business litigation is taking up most of my time. Not typical but may be this way for a while.
  9. What major regulatory changes can your clients expect from the Obama administration over the next three years?
    I am hopeful his recent $30 billion small business loan proposal spurs employment and growth with business clients.
  10. How has the economic crisis affected your clients’ ability to do business? How are they adapting to survive?
    Many business clients are really struggling to obtain credit and funding. They cut costs at every corner. It’s rough.
  11. Let’s talk about your marketing efforts. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    It’s better to be interested than to be interesting. I try to focus the conversation on the person I am talking with.
  12. You blog at Rush on Business (http://bit.ly/9U5YNy). What are your blogging objectives? Are you meeting them?
    I provide info about business legal issues in an easy to understand format. I want to improve the image of lawyers. It’s working.
  13. How are your Web 2.0 activities perceived by your firm’s leadership? Are there others in your firm as active as you?
    My firm is incredibly supportive. My success has helped. Others aren’t as active as me but a couple are blogging routinely.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    It’s been amazing! Too many referrals to count over the past 3-4 years. The blog has helped to elevate my reputation.
  15. Congrats for that. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Recently not as much due to the demands of certain cases. But I usually try to spend an hour or so each day.
  16. Sounds like you’re getting real ROI for it. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Accounting firms beating law firms to the punch. Business lawyers need to develop methods to serve clients more effectively.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Lawyers from nimble boutique firms will have the most success. Intellectual property law will continue to explode.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’m looking to take Tony LaRussa’s job if he doesn’t win the World Series so there’s still a chance I’ll be a MLB manager.
  19. Good luck with that! How do you want to be remembered?
    That I was a positive role model for my children, loved my wife and gave it my all in my endeavors.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I spend time with my wife and kids. I coach baseball and football. We’re home bodies on the weekends with no games.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Think creatively. A law degree is useful in many ways besides practicing law. Explore options outside a law practice.
  22. And our last question for you today — what advice do you have for people going to law school now?
    Consider your reasons for going to law school. Is it to make lots of money? You might be sorely disappointed upon graduation.

Wise advice…. Thanks very much for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice.

Thank you very much for the interview today. I enjoyed it! Keep up your great work.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@bretttrout

April 1st, 2009

123_2321

Brett J. Trout

Iowa Patent Attorney

Author since 2003 of BlawgIT

Author of Cyber Law: A Legal Arsenal for Online Business

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @BrettTrout, a patent lawyer, award-winning blogger and author from Des Moines, Iowa

  1. @BrettTrout, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is the person behind @BrettTrout?
    My lovely wife. She reins in my motorcycle racing, cage fighting and general nerdery
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Patents, Trademarks, Software Licensing, Terms of Use, Document Retention Policies. Counselor for all things nerdly
     
  3. I’m beginning to detect a theme…. What type of clients do you represent?
    I typically represent smaller clients: individuals, inventors, start-up ventures and small software companies.
     
  4. What is the most important legal issue affecting these clients?
    Volatility of the law. IT laws are constantly changing. Clients need to be able to rely on the underlying rules of the game.
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    We are in this together. I provide you the appropriate legal advice to help you make your business decisions.
     
  6. What’s the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    I just wrapped up a 5yr patent infringement trial. We not only won, but the court awarded us treble damages & atty fees.
     
  7. You must have many infringement trials. Why was this one most significant?
    Patent infringement litigation typically runs over $1.5M per side just in atty fees. We did this one for about 1/10th that.
     
  8. That IS significant. Why do your clients hire you?
    Most appreciate my ability to communicate. Communication is the most important aspect of the atty/client relationship.
     
  9. Why *should* they hire you?
    Not every client *should* hire me. Every client is unique. Sometimes I refer them to an atty better matched to their needs.
     
  10. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
    I have not noticed the economy affecting my clients. People are still inventing. Small companies are still growing.
     
  11. That’s great for them and you. Switching gears a bit: how do you sell your practice?
    Iowa is the most restrictive state when it comes to *selling* your practice. I rely mostly on atty & client referrals
     
  12. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Too much time. I love interacting with people, so it is more “fun” than “work.” Probably a couple hours per day.
     
  13. What value have you seen from being on Twitter?
    Des Moines’ Twitter community is powerful & vibrant. Twitter connects me w/a lot of great people both locally & abroad.
     
  14. You publish an award-winning patent law blog, “BlawgIT” (http://bit.ly/QdAe). What led you to start blogging in 2003?
    Fellow Des Moinesian @ChrisPirillo got me hooked on blogging. He’s always way ahead of the curve, so I knew it would be big
     
  15. Has blogging made you a better lawyer? How?
    Yes. Blogging forces me to stay up to date on important issues & be able to communicate them succinctly to clients
     
  16. You’re also a published author. How did you come to write a book on CyberLaw?
    I wanted a CyberLaw desk reference back in 2000. When I couldn’t find one, I wrote one. Currently working on the 4th ed.
     
  17. In your spare time, no doubt… What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Transparency. The Internet breaks down barriers b/t clients & lawyers, forcing lawyers to be more honest, open & responsive
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    I see smaller firms gaining ground as they interconnect w/one another to offer clients much more customized legal services
     
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d love to race motorcycles, but I’m too big. I’d love to fight MMA but my wife wants me in one piece. Probably an inventor
     
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    He was good at what he did.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I attend a lot of my kids’ sporting events. I read. I cook. I travel. I drink wine. I connect with friends & family.
     
  22. Our last question of the day: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    I found law school was fun & interesting, but I may be the only one. Most importantly, choose quality of life over money.

Thank you so very much for tweeting with 22 Tweets and answering our questions today

Thank you. It was a pleasure. @22twts is a great series

I hope you’ll consider a second twitterview one day to talk about motorcycle racing and cage fighting!

Ha. I crash a lot & take a lot of punches, but what I lack in skill, I make up for in entertaining hyperbole.

As long as you keep entertaining your tweeps like me, we’ll be happy with whatever you do in your non-Twitter time!

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter