@melissabrumback

September 14th, 2010

Melissa Dewey Brumback

Construction and Business Dispute Attorney

Partner, Ragsdale Liggett PLLC

Author, Construction Law in North Carolina blog

Today we’re tweeting with @melissabrumback: NC construction and business dispute lawyer and blawger & “Triangle Impact Law Leader”

  1. @melissabrumback, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @melissabrumback?
    Hello& thxs. NC construction law attny/blogger. Avid reader, Daily Show addict, tar heeler. A “good person” as well lawyer.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I rep companies in civil cases: construction (design defect, delay claims, liens); also some med mal, tort, & contract clms.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mostly architects & engineers. Also contractors, subs, developers, and business owners, & the occasional wronged homeowner.
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Standard of care. Owners & contractors do not understand the A/E does not guarantee perfect design. Managing expectations.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    They must understand how aggressive to be is often a business decision. Lawsuits cost $ and take time from productive work.
  6. Indeed. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Rep an A/E firm w design flaw in plans. We argued design flaw didnt cause damages, & won ($0 verdict) after 2wk jury trial.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    They know I know construction issues: change orders, RFIs, critical path, etc. I can minimize (or eliminate) their exposure.
  8. Compelling arguments…. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Liens & collections are up. But so too are negligence clms. When economy is bad, people sue rather than move to next oppty.
  9. What’s the next big frontier in construction law? What should your clients be doing to prepare for it?
    Green design. Make sure your contract doesn’t overpromise. Have LEED project contracts reviewed for insur and risk issues.
  10. You were GC for the NC Jaycees. Does your representing a non-profit help your corporate clients? How?
    I learned to minimze risk *while* meeting biz goals. Not just say “no”. Helps me meet client goals vs just being roadblock.
  11. Valuable skills to have…. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I defend companies (mostly construction co’s) from frivolous lawsuits. (Can you tell I usually work the defense side?)
  12. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    In May. I resisted but @kellyduffort sold me on it. Now see it can be very useful tool to meet thought leaders in my field.
  13. Tell us about Construction Law in NC (http://bit.ly/bShILb). Who do you write for? Why should they read it?
    I write for A/E/C biz folk, to give them tips to stay out of trouble. A few preventive measures = lots of ROI at end of day.
  14. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Too much! I aim for 1hr/5 days, but sometimes much more. I schedule blog posts, then join twitter, linkedin as I can.
  15. Too much time is easy to do…. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Just now getting momentum- 2 direct referrals in 2 wks! Also, getting to know other constr law professionals = invaluable.
  16. Congrats for that! Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    People “doing law” via web on the cheap w/o lawyers. Hurts their biz & ours. Web should supplement, not replace ur lawyer.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    More online interact & cloud case docs, but will always need lawyer you can trust, and to actually go to court for you!
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d own a used bookstore/café, where I read the inventory while writing my great American Novel. (Also my retirement plan!)
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    “She was a lawyer, but nice despite that fact.” No reason you can’t practice law with a heart.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Time w/ family is most important. Reading, traveling, marathon Law & Order sessions can also be fun!
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Show genuine interest in and be kind to everyone. You never know who knows who or who can help you. Hang in there!
  22. And our last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Classmates =future referrals-> stay in touch. Join bar committees; meet practicing lawyers. It’s never too early to network.

Valuable advice. And a great interview. Thank you very much for answering our questions today

Thanks so much for having me!

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@constructionlaw 2.0

August 19th, 2010

Christopher G. Hill

Attorney, The Law Office of Christopher G. Hill, PC

Author, Construction Law Musings

LEED AP

Instructor, Solo Practice University

Today, we’re tweeting with @constructionlaw: VA construction attorney, LEED AP, construction law blogger and May 2009 interviewee

  1. @Constructionlaw, thank you for joining us today on Twitter, and welcome back to 22 Tweets. Tell us, who is @Constructionlaw?
    thx 4 having me back ,a construction attorney that wants 2 help construction folks manage their risk & grow their business.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I am a construction attorney and do my best to keep clients out of trouble, and get them out of trouble when necessary
  3. Since our 1st interview, you’ve “gone solo” (congrats on that, by the way). How did that change your practice?
    I still provide wht I hope is gr8 client service but now can be more flexible in meeting client’s needs more directly.
  4. Any advice for other lawyers considering a solo practice?
    have confidence in yourself & let personality & expertise shine though, in marketing & in practice. The rest will come.
  5. I believe your LEED AP cert is also new since May 2009. What does that mean for your clients?
    a level of familiarity w/ the LEED green building certification that will help w/ new construction contracting landscape
  6. Let’s talk about your clients. What type of clients do you represent?
    Any level of commercial construction professional for the most part, right now mostly subcontractors and suppliers
  7. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    getting paid! Really, this is the biggest thing with this economy.
  8. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That i’m a part of their team, whether in litigation or hopefully in business growth & that I understand their issues.
  9. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    They are all significant, but representing a national window manufacturer in some litigation was one of the biggest.
  10. How has the construction landscape evolved since we last tweeted? Who are the new players? Who’s gone?
    So much has changed I have several friends and/or clients that have gone through significant expansion or contraction.
  11. What’s the next big frontier in construction law? What should your clients be doing to prepare for it?
    Green building & it’s impact on how we build projects. They need 2 recognize the unique issues w/ green construction
  12. How do you describe what you do to someone you meet at a cocktail reception?
    A risk manager for construction professionals or outside, in house counsel for construction companies
  13. Nice. What are some challenges of marketing a solo practice that you didn’t see when you were part of larger firm?
    not much has changed, I was always marketing my own practice. This may be different had I been at a truly large firm
  14. You blog at Construction Law Musings (http://bit.ly/17FHYY). How has your blog evolved over past year and a half?
    its growth has been amazing! The Guest Post Fridays (in which you’ve participated) add depth that I could not have imagined
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    yes. I get calls from out of state contractors or lawyers. I also just today got a client from my firm website.
  16. Congrats for that! The economy & the need to retool: still the most significant issues facing the legal profession?
    Yes, In short, the legal profession seems to be stuck in the past and it’s come home to roost in many ways
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Who knows? Things R changing so fast. I think thr will be more small specialized firms working in loose referral networks.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Tough one. Something involving people that would let me also hang with my great family.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a lawyer who balanced family and clients in a way that let him represent his clients to the fullest and have fun doing it
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    When? Oh, mostly kid and family related activities or playing tennis or shooting (poorly) at sporting clays.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Market, Also, don’t get too down, you have a skill set you can use and you’ll figure out how to use it.
  22. And our final question for you, Chris: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    besides go back in time and make a new decision? Try to have fun in law school and explore what you’d be passionate about.

Valuable advice to close this great interview. Thank you very much for coming back to 22 Tweets!

Glad to do it, thanks!

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@douglasreiser

May 11th, 2010

Douglas Reiser

Founder, Reiser Legal LLC

Author, The Builders Counsel Blog

LEED Accredited Professional

Today we’re tweeting with LEED AP @douglasreiser, a Washington state construction lawyer and blogger

  1. @douglasreiser thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @douglasreiser?
    So glad to be here today, thank you for having me on…..
    1st a husband, then a worker, idea monger, brewer, sportsman & worst of all – a Cleveland sports fan. these define me from 12 to 12
  2. Well this just might be your year…. Tell us about your law practice.
    a 24 hour shop in my head. i built a remote practice that follows wherever i go. goals = access, comm., efficiency & understanding
    ……and i hope you are right about the Cavs (presumably you didnt mean the Browns or Indians!)
  3. Very interesting. What type of clients do you represent?
    those inundated w. construction concerns. the focus is on the business, their risks & protection. I also rep breweries, my hobby
  4. Nice hobby…. What is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Risk. businesses dont understand its extent; it comes at all angles, in all they do. I locate those risks and eliminate/reduce them
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That im here when you need me. you can find me 24hrs/7 days a week. i’ll clear my table to help you, because i love the challenge.
  6. Am sure they appreciate. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    significance is in the eye of the beholder. i think its green builders that i help wade through liability. new challenge for all.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    im a person, like everyone. im tangible; im understood. i lived/breathed construction on & off the job. people feel comfort in that
  8. What’s the busiest area of your practice right now? Is that typical?
    public contracting. today’s only fish in the pond 4 builders. i help obtain jobs & preserve rights. its atypical; recent explosion
  9. Tell us about your LEED AP certification. What does it mean? Why is it important to your clients?
    LEED AP isnt a gold key 2 green building; attys should never hide behind it. A step to learning what should be uniform in building
  10. What’s the next big legal battleground in green construction law? How is it expected to play out?
    field is set to determine performance liability + GBCI LEED challenges & the Int. Green Const. Code could spawn work for attorneys
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    im myself. lawyers drink wine – i drink beer (Stout/IPA). Im approachable in that image. sports are the best icebreaker in building
  12. You blog at The Builders Counsel blog (http://bit.ly/aWm9R8). What’s your strategy? How do you decide what to write?
    i heard @kevinokeefe say “listen” is key word in social media. 100% agree. I found the best group of talkers; i listen + add my bit
  13. Indeed. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use to market your practice?
    I have two blogs + @Avvo, @LinkedIn, @legalriver, Plaxo, Justia, @consupo, LawyerLink, Legal Guru, etc. – i try & be everywhere.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    People want an answer. Any atty can say you should consult an attorney/I need to see more. we’re transparent online; people like it
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing and enhancing your brand / marketing your practice?
    way too hard to quantify; its all the time. i try to listen to the online community all day & respond when i have a worthy thought.
  16. Understood. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    progression v. ethical restraint. A lot of attys are afraid to go Web 2.0. They are missing out and i feel its not fair to them.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    trans. tasks by legal biz’s w/o malpractice, billable hr., the office & a suit. Court battles: less formal, less paper & less fight
  18. Interesting perspective. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    your easiest question. own a brewery, create a web of distribution 4 craft brewers around US & fight the 3 tier system. retirement.
  19. What do you do when you’re not working?
    go outdoors w/ my beer writer wife (@beerblotter). travel around the world. check out new buildings in SEA. agonize over CLE sports
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a worker. someone who worked hard to find answers & innovate. dont need my name in gold; dont need a plaque. just happy clients
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    reinvent what you know about law. be innovative. find something you know and advocate for it loudly. people will find your voice.
  22. Our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    dont look back at law, look ahead. At school, find a job/opp that gives you a 1st hand look at practice. go Web 2.0 now! dont wait

good advice, Doug. Thanks very much for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed learning more about you / your practice.

Thanks so much for having me on today. Your questions were great!

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@matthewdevries

March 18th, 2010

Matthew J. DeVries

Construction Attorney

LEED Accredited Professional

Partner, Smith Cashion & Orr, PLC

Author of Best Practices Construction Law

Today we’re tweeting with LEED AP @matthewdevries, a Nashville-based construction lawyer and blogger

  1. @matthewdevries thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @matthewdevries?
    Thx. Best description: Christ follower. Husband. Dad to 5 (soon 6) kids. Construction Atty. Speaker. Author wannabe.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    My practice: 75% Construction; 25% Commercial Litigation; 10% blogging,marketing,speaking. That’s 110% practice!!!
  3. You’ve probably underestimated it at that…. What type of clients do you represent?
    My clients: Owners, A/E, contractors, subk, suppliers. This yr also included many pro-bono clients, nonprofits
  4. And what is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Issue affecting clients: hard economic times affect everything, from contract drafting to claims to liens to collection
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I tell every new client that I will pour my heart into their case, give them my all, but I will always play by the rules
  6. Am sure they appreciate that. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Major representation included huge win for road builder following wk long trial. On appeal now …
    Other major representation involved guiding a local homeless non-profit and helping w/construction of new facility
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I hope clients hire me for my work ethic, experience, litigation track record. But it may just be my good looks (NOT)
  8. What type of billing arrangements are your clients requesting? Is that typical?
    Primary billing arrangement remains hourly. Had a number of blended terms lately: reduced fee + contingency (mostly liens)
  9. Tell us about your LEED AP certification. What does it mean? Why is it important to your clients?
    LEED AP = certification involving @usgbc; means you have understanding of green bldg practices & LEED Rating System …
    LEED AP is imp to clients b/c they need advice on new risks and how to allocate that risk on green projects
  10. More and more builders are adapting green building techniques. What are some of the legal dangers of “going green”?
    Dangers of going green: new risks & failed expectations. Contracts are mechanism to address both of these.
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    Anyone who meets me knows I love my wife/kids. As father and atty, I prepare for unknown. I am a chaos manager! …
    If they ask “what is construction law” I say contract disputes, arguments over concrete, payment disputes, falling buildings
  12. You blog about a wide variety of topics. What’s your overall blogging strategy? How do you decide what to write on?
    I blog about the things that interest my clients, whether strictly construction, leadership, technology, family …
    …my friend @cordellparvin had a good post yesterday: http://bit.ly/dBb0di It’s easy to find topics. Hard to find the time
  13. Indeed. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use to market your practice?
    Other Web 2.0 tools: LinkedIn somewhat; Facebook for friends and family, although I see others using FB for business.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Impact of Web2.0: Gets my name out. New speaking opportunities. Few new clients from cold calls. Mostly name recog, though.
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Don’t tell my partners but I spend about 1hr per day (+/-) developing my brand. I am getting more efficient though b
    BTW, none of them Tweet, so I think I’m safe…
  16. Mum’s the word…. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Ouch. Tough one … ETHICS! “First thing we do is kill all the lawyers” Was a compliment long ago. Now, butt end of a joke …
    Was heckled by participant in presentation last week for being “Atty”. That mentality is what we have to change.BTW, none of them Tweet, so I think I’m safe…
  17. Yikes. That doesn’t sound like fun. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Legal landscape in 10yrs: Hopefully we are more efficient in our work by relying on technology. More virtual work.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    If not a lawyer, I would love to be motivational-family-leadership speaker guy and author! I still may be day … Watch out!
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    What’s up with the tough questions? Save the zingers for the end? …
    I would want to be remembered by legacy of raising good kids who love God, work hard, serve others, enjoy life to fullest.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Not working. What’s that? When not “at” work, I manage chaos at home, make gourmet meals, enjoy kids. Golf sometimes.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Unemployed attys, find your passion! Here are a few posts I did on this issue: http://bit.ly/5hvpnV and http://bit.ly/cTAUIG
  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Hate to do this, but see prior answer. Can’t stress enough how imp it is to love what ur doing. Find that out b4 law sch.

No apologies needed; it’s good advice. Thanks for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed it very much.

Thanks for the interview. I enjoyed it! Gotta run. New chaos: family member w/kidney stones! Thanks again.

Good luck!

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@AndreaGoldman

July 14th, 2009

andrea_sittin-croppedjpgAndrea Goldman

Construction, business and real estate disputes attorney

Law Office of Andrea Goldman

Author of Home Contractor v. Homeowner Blog and the Massachussets Builders Blog

Today we’re tweeting with construction, business and real estate disputes lawyer, arbitrator and mediator @AndreaGoldman

  1. @AndreaGoldman, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @AndreaGoldman?
    I am an advocate and neutral who uses all of my tools to resolve disputes, adviser to construction companies, exercise fanatic, mom.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I spend about 80% of my time litigating and negotiating settlements, 15% on arbitration and mediation and 5% on writing contracts.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I represent builders, contractors, construction companies, homeowners and businesses resolving disputes and writing contracts
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    For residential contractors: staying in compliance with the law. All of construction-having good contracts that protect them.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    My job is to take a disaster in your life and turn it into something you can move on from. A lawsuit is not a good way to make $$.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Represented Perini v. Missouri with my partner. Suit about construction of a bridge that was delayed due to concealed conditions…
    Represented four homeowners whose property was damaged by a mudslide caused by faulty excavation and grading by developer.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I am known in my community as a business, construction lawyer and neutral. I am responsive to clients and mindful of their budgets.
  8. All very good reasons! What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Both homeowners and contractors/construction companies call about disputes that are too small to handle. It’s the bad economy
  9. How do you help your clients to decide the best way to resolve a construction dispute?
    It’s simple: likelihood of success on the merits combined with ability to collect on a judgment and the amount of potential damages
  10. You weren’t always a solo practitioner. Why did you make the leap? How long did it take to feel established?
    I had the opportunity to form a partnership. It dissolved and I had already established a practice. It took 18 months from scratch.
  11. That’s quite impressive. How do you market your practice?
    I run lawyer dinners, network, write two blogs, write articles, give presentations, belong to a builders’ association and web 2.0.
  12. Busy. You blog on contractor disputes (http://bit.ly/wIPUD) & MA builders (http://bit.ly/16pcIX) Who reads them? Why?
    Contractors, builders, construction firms, lawyers and consumers. They are intended to be the “’go to” sites for construction in MA.
  13. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use?
    Well, I have two websites, one of which is a consortium of construction lawyers that I am developing. LinkedIn, Facebook, etc
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you seen from your Web 2.0 activities?
    I get about 40% of my clients from the Internet, so the impact is huge. More people are finding their service providers on the web.
  15. Wow – that IS huge. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand then?
    Too much time! I need to find more balance because I need to write more blogs posts, make a Facebook fan page and write articles.
  16. Seems to be a widespread problem…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Changing our billing practices. I believe that hourly billing is unproductive. Clients prefer value billing and knowing fees.
  17. Indeed. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    People will continue to specialize. There will be fewer lawyers but they will be happier because they want to be in the profession.
  18. Interesting perspective. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I would open a dessert and dancing café and make all of the desserts. Would showcase local talent and offer games, puzzles for use.
  19. That sounds like fun! How do you want to be remembered?
    As a genuinely caring person who helped a lot of people, raised fabulous kids and was really fun to be around.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I exercise every day, which takes a lot of time. I hang out with my kids, read, love to cook and sew. I also love movies /theater.
  21. What advice would you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your hand in the profession by volunteering. Learn new skills. Stay up on new developments in your field. Network like crazy.
  22. And our last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    A law school education teaches you a new way to think. Make sure you love it. Law is a business, learn how to run a business .

This was a great twitterview; thank you very much for answering our questions!

Thank you Lance! This was really fun and forced me to think more about my practice.

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@constructionlaw

May 19th, 2009

hill-036Christopher G. Hill

Principal, Durrette Bradshaw PLC

Virgina Business Magazine “Legal Elite” in Construction Law

Author of the Construction Law Musings blog

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @constructionlaw: construction lawyer, commercial litigator and one of VA Biz Mag’s “Legal Elite”

  1. @Constructionlaw, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. In 140 characters, who is @Constructionlaw?
    A guy who enjoys representing construction folks, enjoys the interaction of law practice, and is out to help clients succeed
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I work with all “levels” of construction pros in an attempt to keep them out of trouble and go to court if necessary
     
  3. What are some specific types of clients you represent?
    Mostly subcontractors and suppliers, but some general contractors and engineers
     
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Right now, getting paid. I see green construction being one on the horizon
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That depends. I always focus on their issues. The first question I ask is what their biggest issue is.
     
  6. What’s the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Recently I represented a pipeline company in a big suit in Federal Court. I think all of them are significant though
     
  7. Good point…. Why do your clients hire you?
    I think because of my expertise and that they know I have their interest, even more than my financial stake, at heart.
     
  8. How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    I am telling them all to be proactive and think hard about their business practices . . ..
    If I can help them through their financial bumps, I feel good and they tend to come back
     
  9. Makes perfect sense. Congrats on joining the faculty of Solo Practice University. What do you teach for them?
    Construction Practice 101 (or how to get, serve and keep a construction client) #SPU
     
  10. How do you help your clients meet their business and strategic objectives?
    By reviewing their business practices and contracts from a risk management perspective . . .
    and working with another great lawyer at my firm on other issues
     
  11. Hmmm – a future 22 Tweets twitterviewee, perhaps… How do you market your practice?
    presenting to the local AGC chapter and being active in the AGC. my blog #SPU, talking to people
     
  12. Tell us about your blog, Construction Law Musings (http://bit.ly/17FHYY). Who is it written for?
    Anyone interested in the construction industry and its marketing and legal issues, from contractors to lawyers.
     
  13. What was your objective when you started blogging? Has that changed?
    I need an objective? (grin) Actually, it was to get my thoughts out in a less formal and more immediate way…
    My objective now that I do that is to have Musings be a resource
    For more on this see @lawfirmblogger’s great interview at http://bit.ly/XCHzv    

  14. It certainly would seem that your blog is a valuable industry resource. Has blogging made you a better lawyer? How?
    Yes. It keeps me up to date on issues and through my guest posts teaches me something on at least a weekly basis.
     
  15. Your use of guest posts is great. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Who knows, at least an hour, on days like today when I was part of a panel at the AGC, much more.
     
  16. All time well spent I’m sure. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    Yes, I have gotten more calls from web hits and have made numerous connections that I never would have had.
     
  17. Let’s switch gears a bit: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Besides the economy and the need to retool our business model. Well, the economy and the need to retool our business model.
     
  18. Indeed. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Who knows? My view is that there will be fewer mammoth firms and more solos and small firms due to client demand.
     
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Wow, probably a nutty philosophy professor, that’s all that my degree qualified me to do besides law school :)
     
  20. Now I *get* the #SPU gig…. How do you want to be remembered?
    (smile) As a guy who helped people and had fun doing it but mostly as a great dad and husband.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Chase the kids, study for the LEED AP exam (until June 13) try to learn to shoot sporting clays & spend time with my family
     
  22. Good luck w/LEED exam! Final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Be ready to hit the ground running and if necessary start your own firm. . .
    Try to get as much practical experience as your school will let you and mostly have fun with it.

Great advice. Thank you very much for your time today; you gave us another great 22 Tweets twitterview!

you’re welcome. Thanks for the opportunity

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