@danharris

April 23rd, 2009

dan_harris

Daniel P. Harris

Partner, Harris & Moure

Author of the award-winning China Law Blog

Appearances on Fox News, Fox Report, CBC Report on Business, BBC World, BBC World Have Your Say

 

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @danharris: international lawyer, “Sushi grade” China Law blogger, news & movie junkie, and more

  1. @Danharris, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Who is the person behind @Danharris?
    Me. Just me.
     
  2. Can’t go wrong with that. Tell us about your law practice.
    It’s 99% international law. Maybe around 60% China, 20% Korea, 15% Russia, 5% Misc.
     
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    From Startups to Fortune 50 companies. Most have between $5 and $300 in revenues.
    Whoops. Meant between $5 million and $300 million, not between $5 and $300.
     
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Great question. Figuring out the law and following it.
     
  5. Imagine that’s difficult in those jurisdictions. What’s the single most important business issue affecting your clients?
    Very tough in China, yes. Toughest business issue is the credit crunch.
     
  6. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    “Hi, I’m Dan. ” Hard to generalize much beyond that….. sorry…..
     
  7. It is what it is, right? What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Helping recover $300+ million in assets from Russia RIGHT after fall of communism. Got WSJ cover story out of it. ….
    Funnest was going to Papua New Guinea to recover three helicopters.
     
  8. Impressive results. Why do your clients hire you?
    Three reasons, primarily. 1. Quality 2. Responsiveness/Concern/Personality 3. Price Fairness
     
  9. You’ve become a leading voice on China / China law in a relatively short time. What led you to your China practice?
    It’s actually taken a long time. We were big in Korea & Russia & China was thrust on us by our clients.
     
  10. How will the rule of law in China affect the way business is done in China?
    It already has & it will continue to do so. Foreign companies must follow laws or they run real risk of getting tossed.
     
  11. You may have just answered this in part, but what’s the future for foreign lawyers in China?
    Very bright. Cultural differences are a huge & permanent chasm. This holds true for most foreign countries, even European ones
     
  12. How do you market your practice?
    By never sitting still. Blogging. Speaking. Writing. Lunches. Phone calls.
     
  13. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Every minute I work I am enhancing the brand, so I will say 12-16. As my Twitter profile says, “sleep is for wussies.”
     
  14. You’re the principal author of the award-winning China Law Blog (http://bit.ly/n4k7T). Who do you write it for?
    The SME owner or CFO who is in China or thinking about going there.
     
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    It creates huge media publicity, which leads to clients. Clients come in already knowing where I stand on things.
     
  16. That’s very useful, I’m sure. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    BigLaw costs too much. Firms must move from hourly billing. Abt 75% of my firm’s work is flat fee. Better for clients & for us
     
  17. That’s a lot! Guess we’ll need a second twitterview…. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Mega firms and specialized boutique firms. Mid-sized “national” firms will be no more.
     
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Radio Talk Show Host……Full time blogger/twitterer?
     
  19. I’m sure you’d be successful at that too…. How do you want to be remembered?
    Too deep for me…. As a great father and a good person.
     
  20. More down to earth, then: what do you do when you’re not working?
    Dote on my kids, work out, read, watch TV, go to movies & plays, travel for fun.
     
  21. As opposed to traveling for clients… How many miles would you say you travel in a typical year?
    Maybe 150,000 air miles for clients…. 25,000 for pleasure. Guessing.
     
  22. That’s a lot of time in the air… Final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t I know it. I would say don’t go to law school unless you know what you want to do with the degree once U have it.
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@dinayin

April 9th, 2009

yindDina J. Yin

Associate at Baker & Daniels (Beijing and Indianapolis)

International transactions and patent / trademark lawyer

Author of Indiana China Lawyer

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @DinaYin, a transactional lawyer currently based in the Beijing office of an international firm

  1. @DinaYin, thank you for joining us today at 22 Tweets. Tell us: who is the person behind @DinaYin?
    Thanks for having me. In no particular order, int’l business lawyer, foodie, traveler, blogger, creative thinker.
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    cross-border transactions, IP enforcement, U.S. import & export controls.
     
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Fortune 500 to startups. Clients come to B&D for international service at reasonable midwest rates.
     
  4. What is the most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    At the moment, how to handle downsizing operations in China yet still work with the recent Chinese labor law changes.
     
  5. Sounds like uncharted territory…. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    When it comes to China, I always tell clients to be VERY patient. Focus on relationship building, not the result….
    You’d be surprised at how a change in focus will help in obtaining results.
     
  6. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Setting up my first subsidiaries in China and India for a client.
     
  7. Why was it significant?
    It was my first substantive “international business attorney” experience….
    It had all the right ingredients: cross jurisdictional legal issues, players from different countries, time zones…
     
  8. Why do your clients hire you?
    Lawyers at my firm have a reputation for being practical, cost-effective problem solvers…
    But as a “China lawyer,” you have to understand the problem from both a legal and cultural perspective and EXPLAIN it.
     
  9. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
    Not much. It’s made them more creative in finding business opportunities worldwide and not focus on the U.S.
     
  10. Have you and your firm had to respond to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    Tailor fee structure to legal budget, provide set quotes if necessary, work with the client’s time line for payment.
     
  11. How do you market your practice?
    Twitterviews! Web 2.0, seminars, face to face meetings. But most of all, continue doing quality work for existing clients.
     
  12. Can never go wrong with that! How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Sometimes all day… and now all night… No, probably 3 to 4 hours a day on average.
     
  13. What value have you seen from being on Twitter?
    It keeps me connected to my Indy network, meet new tweeps re China law, updated on developments on China and Int’l matters.
     
  14. Your blog, Indiana China Lawyer (http://bit.ly/jJDsA)=your China experiences. How did U sell a non-legal blog to your firm?
    The firm approached me! The blog is about my experience in China from all facets (legal and non-legal)….
    Clients want to know how to do business in China. That’s the day-to-day, networking, AND legal. My blog=all those views.
     
  15. Interesting take; had not thought of that – How important are your Web 2.0 activities to the marketing of your practice?
    It’s increasingly important to use new mediums for networking and potential clients, especially in an international setting.
     
  16. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    I agree with @Jayshep on this. There’s an increasing need for the legal profess. 2 think abt alt. fee arrangements.
     
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Lower billing rates, more regional firms rather than gargantuan firms. Stronger networks amongst firms to cross-sell.
     
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    At this moment: probably be a traveling journalist and spend at least a month in Yunnan, China.
     
  19. I liked your blog post on Yunnan; makes me want to visit. How do you want to be remembered?
    Wow. That’s a loaded question. I think for now, just someone who can adapt to any challenge.
     
  20. You’re no doubt getting a lot of practice at that these days. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Trying to see as much of China/Asia as I can this year!
     
  21. What’s been the most difficult thing about the move to China?
    The night vs. day time zone change is the biggest challenge for effective communication….
    Local system works better 4 u when here.. But a Chinese solution for American clients can be hard for them to accept.
     
  22. One last question: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t let the rat race in school bog u down. Connect ur life skills to ur legal knowledge when interviewing — all 1 package.
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