@HyperionLaw

May 31st, 2011

Cynthia Gilbert

Entrepreneurial Patent Attorney

Founder of Hyperion Law

Author of the Hyperion Law Blog

Today we’re tweeting Boston IP lawyer, passionate technologist, and founder of her own law firm @HyperionLaw

  1. @HyperionLaw, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @HyperionLaw?
    I’m a technologist, early adopter/geek, patent attorney. I passionately do outstanding work for clients I really believe in.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    It’s a radically different law firm focused on translating complex patent-ese into strategic business advice for tech companies
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I love working w/ emerging tech companies – any company with software tech, eg 2 computers & internet cloud, is right up my alley!
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Understanding case law’s impact on software #patents & how to draft claims satisfying legal reqs while remaining useful to business
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Patents are a critical tool – or tragic waste of $. Let’s discuss business goals to understand whether you benefit from filing one!
  6. Interesting. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    A diabetes co had new glucose tools for useful, fun data interaction; it was satisfying to help them go from hard- to soft-ware IP!
  7. I’ll bet it was. Why do your clients hire you?
    An experienced, personable attorney & unabashed geek w/ solid tech background, I keep us focused on business benefits of IP
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Software #patents for tech companies with some friends-and-family or angel funding. It’s what I love so I hope it remains typical :)
  9. You spent 5 years in a big firm before starting your own. What led you that decision? Are you meeting your objectives?
    Normal fee & firm structures reduce/kill interaction between experienced attys & clients. I saw a different way. Totally successful!
  10. That’s great! How are your small / med-sized tech company clients doing in this economy? Is the crisis over for them?
    If you’re cash-constrained, I suspect there’s always a crisis! But these clients are adaptive and smart; they create ways to survive
  11. What’s the next big frontier of IP law? Who will be most affected by it?
    The biggest battle is always over growing fees. A new biz trying to preserve IP options will find it harder to afford key advice.
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    “I help companies protect their world-changing technology via strategic use of IP. And run a radically different law firm to do so.”
  13. Nice. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    2008. I wanted to continue developing relationships w/ favorite clients. Now I also want to get to know others working w/ tech cos
  14. You blog at Hyperion Law (http://bit.ly/mMg8lK). Who do your write it for? Why should they read it?
    Anyone who has to deal w/ US software #patents: CxO, GCs, entrepreneurs. I provide useful & jargon-free info, which is hard to find!
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Absolutely. One of my clients hired me after reading my posts on Quora; others decide to hire me when they read the blog.
  16. Congrats on that. Let’s change gears now: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    We *could* tell clients we see their biz realities and will revamp the biz of law to forge even closer ties with them. But will we?
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Cynically, I suspect it will look much the same as it does today! Some going w/ tried & true; some working creatively w/clients.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    An astrophysicist or an anthropologist. Or maybe an anthropologist who studies humanity’s obsession with the universe ;)
  19. :-) How do you want to be remembered?
    As someone who lived and loved passionately and joyfully, gave back to the community, and was fun to be around.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I read fascinating non-fiction, check out new restaurants with my friends, travel the world with my husband, and spoil our two cats.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Take the time to do some serious soul searching about what you really want and gather info on how to get it. Don’t despair!
  22. And our final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Talk to many lawyers, get as much work experience in a law practice as you possibly can; work hard to understand the path you’re on

Great advice. Thank you very much for today’s interview. I enjoyed getting to know you and your practice

Thank you! I really enjoyed the discussion!

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@dgvelaw

January 26th, 2010

cimg9282Danielle G. Van Ess

DGVE Law, LLC

Adoption, Estate Planning, Residential Real Estate Attorney

Author of Massachusetts Wills, Trusts, and Estates

Today we’re tweeting with @dgvelaw, a Massachusetts lawyer who helps people add to, protect, and move their families

  1. @dgvelaw thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @dgvelaw?
    Thanks for having me – very excited about this!
    Deadhead feminist Atty-Mama (5, 3 & 5 mos), fun wife, big sister, DD, loyal friend, clients’ trusted family advisor for life
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    DGVE law helps pp add to, protect, & move their families: adoption, estate planning, residential real estate
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    most DGVE law clients are in their 30s-40s, own homes in the Greater Boston area & are parents of minor children
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    legally protecting their kids- naming guardians & ensuring kids’ $ is protected until they’re mature enough to receive it
  5. Important matters indeed. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    we date b/f we get engaged- I tell prospective clients a little about me, ask about them, then we can see if rel. would work
  6. I like that analogy. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I’ve had the privilege of becoming the trusted family advisor to an extended family, helping each of them…
    Also very excited about clients who started w/me for estate planning & are now in the process of adopting!
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I’m genuine, friendly, deeply empathize w/my clients & want to help them in as easy a way possible- they can sense that immediately
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Estate Planning (Wills, Trusts, Guardians for Kids, Living Wills) though Real Estate & Adoption have been picking up lately
  9. What’s the most common mistake people make with respect to estate planning. How can they fix it?
    Avoid/delay. No certainty but death/taxes but never know when disability/death will come, what cost, or how old kids’ll be…
    always better to plan calmly than react in crisis. DIY estate planning = close second- that’ll be big news going forward.
  10. Heard it here first…. You charge flat fees for your work. How long have you done that? How has it changed your practice?
    did some hrly billing as I was taught when I first went solo. It was awful for me & the clients. I decided never again &…
    everyone’s happier this way. It fosters more & better communication & engenders more good will all around.
  11. That makes sense. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I help pp add to (adopt), protect (plan for disability & death), & move (homes) their families in empowering, friendly way.
  12. You blog at MA Wills, Trusts, and Estates (http://bit.ly/SXyj1) What objectives drive your blog? Are you meeting them?
    I aim to educate & motivate in easy nonthreatening way to plan NOW/spare families later & believe I’m meeting those goals.
  13. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you regularly use to market your practice?
    FB Fan Page where I regularly interact w/others & also post items related to real estate & adoption. http://bit.ly/4ArcgA
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    I’ve had a # of clients via FB & met wonderful colleagues nationwide & found great referral partners locally via Twitter…
    referred to me or Googling, Clients often say they checked out my website & blog & “liked my vibe”
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I enjoy connecting w/pp on deeper level, find my friendships on & offline personal & professional in origin lead to the best…
    word-of-mouth “brand enhancement.”Also 1 day/wk on my biz & mkting plans, learning what they didn’t teach in law school!
  16. It seems to be working well. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Mistrust of lawyers nothing new, but fear of being “taken” financially exacerbated right now. Disconnect I’m seeing w/…
    clients who feel can’t afford all legal services need, so gamble instead trying DIY approach or w/less comprehensive plan…
    don’t like it but I get it. Something’s better than nothing, so I do what I can to make high quality affordable & accessible
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    not clairvoyant but I’d love to see more respect for less conventional e.g. dedicated home offices & flex hrs enabling more…
    atty-parents to be happier being w/their kids & continuing to serve pp as we worked so hard for so long to learn to do.
    & lots more DIY legal attempts – yikes!
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Spanish Literature Prof. at forward-thinking U. teaching a series of classes from El Quijote! Makes me happy just thinking about it!
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    positive role model/loving, safe harbor for daughters; still-fun-to-hang-out-with wife & friend; clients’ trusted advisor for life
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    5yo 3yo 5mo 2 cats house & DH, but we make time for great TV (recorded to watch when we can), friends & family. I don’t sleep much.
  21. I can imagine…. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    As Mama Odie tells Princess Tiana u gotta dig down deep/figure out what u REALLY want, then work hard to make THAT happen.
  22. Wise words. Our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Make sure heart’s really in it/know why or don’t go. Do what’s always worked for U. Avoid fearful dramatic competition like plague.

Thank you for a very interesting interview; I enjoyed learning about you and your practice very much.

It was my pleasure – thanks so much!

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@leannahamill

October 29th, 2009

mypictureLeanna Hamill

Elder Law & Estate Planning Attorney

Co-founder of Women Attorneys Network of the South Shore

Author of Massachusetts Estate Planning and Elder Law Blog

Today we’re tweeting with Massachusetts Elder Law and Estate Planning Attorney and aspiring yogi @Leannahamill

  1. @Leannahamill thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @Leannahamill?
    She is the woman you are interviewing – Auntie, yogi, dog owner, attorney, business dev. manager, among other things.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I have a 4 yo estate & elder law firm in a small town south of Boston. A solo practice, but I share space w/ another attorney.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    People who want to plan for the future, or need help dealing with a crisis.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    The ability to protect their choices about their health care, their family, their property, & end of life wishes.
  5. Important issues indeed. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That they need to pay me before I start working for them. And that they made the right decision deciding to put a plan in place.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    One of my first clients – helped her write her estate plan, a few years later met her at the hospital when she fell…
    …helped her friend serve as health care agent & power of attorney, helped her sell her condo to pay for assisted living…
    …made sure her last wishes were honored & went to her funeral after she passed. She was an amazing woman & great client.
  7. That’s a great story. Why do your clients hire you?
    I think I make them feel comfortable, they feel confident that I know what I’m doing & usually someone suggested that they hire me.
  8. That’s a good reputation to have… What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Right now lots of guardianship matters. Not typical, but not usually something that can be put off if it’s needed…
    And lots of estate planning, which is more typical. Mostly folks nearing retirement age.
  9. How are your clients managing the crisis? Is it a matter of meeting financial needs or are consequences much greater?
    Some laid low, put off planning for a bit. Younger families held onto their money. Probate work & Medicaid planning continued….
    Most clients came through ok, although those who were saving for retirement in stocks have less than they had planned on.
  10. That’s good to hear. How do you market your practice?
    Mostly through my blog, which brings about 50% of my business. Also thru seminars, quarterly newsletter & mentions in the media…
    I also have clients who act as my own little marketing dept, telling their friends & family about me. That is my favorite way to mkt
  11. Absolutely! How do you describe what you do to people you meet at networking events?
    I don’t have an elevator pitch. I usually just say “I’m an estate planning & elder law attorney”…
    Networking events are my least favorite & least productive way to get clients. But I go to the fun ones & where my friends are.
  12. You blog at MA Estate Planning and Elder Law (http://bit.ly/nq4wv). Who do you write for? Why should they read it?
    I write for potential clients, their children, other attorneys & professional. They should read for useful information.
  13. Besides Twitter and your blog, what Web 2.0 tools do you regularly use to market your practice?
    I am on Avvo, JDSupra, Justia, Linked In. I have a Facebook Fan page: http://is.gd/4HtFg.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    I’ve gotten at least 1 client from each. Blog brings about 50% of my business & media inquiries. Twtr strengthens relationships.
  15. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Hopefully the whole time I’m at work I’m strengthening my brand…keeping my name out there & doing great work for clients.
  16. Well it seems to be working! What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Having to adjust to clients wanting new types of billing & having to learn to market beyond yellow pages & newspaper ads…
    I think we forget that many attorneys still rely on those old ways of marketing & don’t use blogs, and other online tools.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    smaller firms, more “virtual” services, only those people who really want to be attorneys will go to law school….
    It won’t be the “get rich quick” career it was.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Live in a cabin in the mountains, sew, cook, raise goats & have a couture clothing line for children.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a fabulous Auntie, wonderful sister, great friend & fantastic attorney. Hopefully I won’t need to be remembered for a long time.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Cook, knit, sew, hike, swim, read, yoga, & chant kirtan when I can find it around here. Hang out with my family.
  21. Busy…. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Don’t settle or wait for something to fall in your lap. Be proactive and market yourself, and ask for what you are worth.
  22. And our last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t worry about your friend’s study habits. Find what works for you & stick w/ it. Not everyone needs to be at the library @ 1am.

That’s very useful advice. Thank you very much for tweeting w/me today; I enjoyed learning about you and your practice

Thanks for having me!

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@HealthBlawg

September 8th, 2009

dch_head_shot_cropDavid Harlow

The Harlow Group, LLC

Author of HealthBlawg::David Harlow’s Health Care Law Blog

Cancer survivor and six-time rider of the Pan-Mass Challenge

Former Deputy General Counsel of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

Today we’re tweeting with health care lawyer, consultant and cancer survivor @Healthblawg

  1. @Healthblawg, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @Healthblawg?
    I’m David Harlow, Boston-based health care lawyer, consultant, blogger, tweep & escaped New Yorker
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    As a lawyer, I help #healthcare clients navigate the maze of business & regulatory issues unique to the industry…
    this includes structuring relationships and running interference w regulators …
    as a #healthcare consultant, I help clients define goals and develop structures and systems to achieve them…
    I also work with folks implementing #healthcare #socialmedia strategies See http://bit.ly/uxjg1 and http://bit.ly/4cLNub
  3. Wow – sounds like you’re the guy to know! What type of clients do you represent?
    #healthcare providers, vendors and payors – ranging from small MD practices to imaging centers to academic medical centers
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Reimbursement & regulation drive the business of healthcare; we tie ourselves in knots trying to maximize $ & compliance …
    These days, everything is done with one eye on the (unknowable) future shape of federal #healthreform
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I put my publc & privt sector exper, & my virtual netwrk (vs my fmr downtwn firm) to work for you, effectively & efficiently
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Diag imaging and cancer trmt provider dealing w st CON laws and fed antikickback & self-referral laws thru many transactions
    Had a healthy dose of business and regulatory issues in every bite
  7. Sounds very complex; hope it turned out well. Why do your clients hire you?
    Not my boyish good looks … Expertise, experience, efficiency, effectiveness
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice right now? Is that typical?
    Diagnostic imaging & anything touched by HIPAA and what I call Son of HIPAA (from ARRA) from perspec of providers & others
    There’s always some new reg du jour that generates a lot of heat
  9. Makes sense. You touched on this earlier, but what do the proposed Health Care reforms mean to your clients?
    Saving $ for society means taking it away from healthcare providers They must learn to be more efficient and effective …
    Innovations like patient-centered medical home http://bit.ly/HUHaj and value-based purchasing http://bit.ly/urdru are key
  10. Clearly there are significant changes to come. Has the econ crisis affected your clients’ ability to do business today?
    Sure: access to capital issues delay construction projects, uninsured folks defer elective care
  11. How do you market your practice?
    On line and in person: blog, tweets, LinkedIn, Fcbk (cf http://bit.ly/smlaw); also good old fashioned speaking, schmoozing
  12. Tell us about your blog, Health Blawg (http://bit.ly/ixjIo). Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    It’s for folks in the healthcare thick of things; I try not to repeat news but to analyze developments, put them in context

  13. Why did you decide to become active on Twitter? Are you achieving those objectives?
    1. Connect w folks w related professional interests & see what develops 2. Channel for blog – Seems to work for me
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from your Web 2.0 activities?
    Broader reach locally and nationally; clients, referral sources & collaborators find me &/or validate their choice online…
    for example, my 3 newest clients & my current biggest client all found me via web 2.0 activities
  15. That’s great! How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Probably averages out to 1/2 to 1 hour a day or so, through blogging, tweeting, speaking, press interviews, etc.
  16. Let’s switch gears. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Top issue for profession: Communicating value of services to clients; alt billing and implosion of BigLaw are symptoms
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    More fragmentd & more consoldated, w commodity work & bet-the-farm work split up even more than today; decline of BigLaw…
    Big oppty for small firms to move in to the great middle
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Things I almost did: get a PhD in history & literature; become a professional photographer or photography curator
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    Smart, funny guy w perfect work-life balance, & legal & healthcare chops
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Family: off-grid last wk camping. Biking, incl the PMC http://bit.ly/PMC2009. Photography http://bit.ly/12CmbJ Love jazz too
  21. Congrats on raising $4667! What advice do you have for lawyers currently under-/ unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Thanks … Be flexible. Go out on a limb. Do something you love in your free time. Network, network, network.
  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Your future clients are businesses & running a law practice is a business; you need to understand business, not just the law

That’s great advice. Thank you very much for answering our questions today

Thanks Lance – My pleasure

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@AndreaGoldman

July 14th, 2009

andrea_sittin-croppedjpgAndrea Goldman

Construction, business and real estate disputes attorney

Law Office of Andrea Goldman

Author of Home Contractor v. Homeowner Blog and the Massachussets Builders Blog

Today we’re tweeting with construction, business and real estate disputes lawyer, arbitrator and mediator @AndreaGoldman

  1. @AndreaGoldman, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @AndreaGoldman?
    I am an advocate and neutral who uses all of my tools to resolve disputes, adviser to construction companies, exercise fanatic, mom.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I spend about 80% of my time litigating and negotiating settlements, 15% on arbitration and mediation and 5% on writing contracts.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    I represent builders, contractors, construction companies, homeowners and businesses resolving disputes and writing contracts
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    For residential contractors: staying in compliance with the law. All of construction-having good contracts that protect them.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    My job is to take a disaster in your life and turn it into something you can move on from. A lawsuit is not a good way to make $$.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    Represented Perini v. Missouri with my partner. Suit about construction of a bridge that was delayed due to concealed conditions…
    Represented four homeowners whose property was damaged by a mudslide caused by faulty excavation and grading by developer.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    I am known in my community as a business, construction lawyer and neutral. I am responsive to clients and mindful of their budgets.
  8. All very good reasons! What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Both homeowners and contractors/construction companies call about disputes that are too small to handle. It’s the bad economy
  9. How do you help your clients to decide the best way to resolve a construction dispute?
    It’s simple: likelihood of success on the merits combined with ability to collect on a judgment and the amount of potential damages
  10. You weren’t always a solo practitioner. Why did you make the leap? How long did it take to feel established?
    I had the opportunity to form a partnership. It dissolved and I had already established a practice. It took 18 months from scratch.
  11. That’s quite impressive. How do you market your practice?
    I run lawyer dinners, network, write two blogs, write articles, give presentations, belong to a builders’ association and web 2.0.
  12. Busy. You blog on contractor disputes (http://bit.ly/wIPUD) & MA builders (http://bit.ly/16pcIX) Who reads them? Why?
    Contractors, builders, construction firms, lawyers and consumers. They are intended to be the “’go to” sites for construction in MA.
  13. Besides Twitter and your blog, what other Web 2.0 tools do you use?
    Well, I have two websites, one of which is a consortium of construction lawyers that I am developing. LinkedIn, Facebook, etc
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you seen from your Web 2.0 activities?
    I get about 40% of my clients from the Internet, so the impact is huge. More people are finding their service providers on the web.
  15. Wow – that IS huge. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand then?
    Too much time! I need to find more balance because I need to write more blogs posts, make a Facebook fan page and write articles.
  16. Seems to be a widespread problem…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Changing our billing practices. I believe that hourly billing is unproductive. Clients prefer value billing and knowing fees.
  17. Indeed. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    People will continue to specialize. There will be fewer lawyers but they will be happier because they want to be in the profession.
  18. Interesting perspective. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I would open a dessert and dancing café and make all of the desserts. Would showcase local talent and offer games, puzzles for use.
  19. That sounds like fun! How do you want to be remembered?
    As a genuinely caring person who helped a lot of people, raised fabulous kids and was really fun to be around.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I exercise every day, which takes a lot of time. I hang out with my kids, read, love to cook and sew. I also love movies /theater.
  21. What advice would you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Keep your hand in the profession by volunteering. Learn new skills. Stay up on new developments in your field. Network like crazy.
  22. And our last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    A law school education teaches you a new way to think. Make sure you love it. Law is a business, learn how to run a business .

This was a great twitterview; thank you very much for answering our questions!

Thank you Lance! This was really fun and forced me to think more about my practice.

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@barrettdavid

June 4th, 2009

barrett_profile_picDavid A. Barrett

Boston Business Litigation Attorney

Author of the law blog “The Linkedin Lawyer

World’s Largest LinkedIn Lawyer Network

Our 22nd Twitterview is with a star of the legal SocMed universe: @barrettdavid, Boston biz lit lawyer, AKA The LinkedIn Lawyer

Thank you Lance, I’m flattered.

  1. @barrettdavid, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @barrettdavid?
    Father of 2 beautiful children, Husband, social media evangelist, anti-poverty activist, litigation attorney
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Primary law practice is now a legal referral and collaboration practice – all practice areas. New law mkting biz is pre-launch
     
  3. Look forward to learning more about that venture. What type of clients do you work with?
    I help lawyers find other lawyers for referrals. For marketing I help lawyers leverage new media and traditional marketing.
     
  4. What is the single most important issue affecting the lawyers you work with?
    Attorney fee sharing issues in compliance with the ethical rules of the particular jurisdiction – and effective use of social media
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I tell referral attorneys that I’m interested to remain involved in the matter as a practicing attorney ….
    I show social media consulting clients my social media testimonials … as many have their own social media philosophies already
     
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant representations you’ve been involved with.
    Deposed Bill Gates’ former money manager as a new solo for a former Mass. corp against 3 big law firms. I passed Bar in ’06.
     
  7. Wow. Why do lawyers come to you for referrals?
    lawyers are more interested in my lawyer network than they are interested in me really …
    my network attracts referrals because finding the right lawyer nationwide is a pretty hard thing to do really
    really really really … haha I guess I tweet like I talk …
     
  8. How do you market yourself?
    Networking, networking, networking. I am a “networking giver” to build quality relationships and I share my expertise.
    I use LinkedIn to initiate relationships and other soc media to enhance the relationship – better phone and in person mtgs.
     
  9. You’re clearly a strong supporter of lawyers using Twitter for biz dev. Is it right for every attorney? Why / Why not?
    Yes but attorneys need to deeply understand Twitter. It isn’t right for many do-it-yourself-ers ….
    Twitter is a great way for lawyers to get started with blogging (by microblogging) and to stay abreast of their field ….
    Lawyers need a marketing plan and a social media marketing plan … just spending all day on TW isn’t a good use of time
    Lawyers can build relationships with interactive media – the better others know you the more likely they are to do biz w/you
    Lawyers are also a pretty closed group … Twitter is more effective than cold-calling for lawyer relationship initiation
     
  10. Agreed. How do YOU use Twitter for business development?
    Microblogging and building relationships ….
    I like to grow the relationships that start on LinkedIn on interactive media before phone and real meetings.
    Twitter can maintain relationships – even during contract negotiations … hey I’m still interested – retweeted you today
     
  11. You claim to have the “largest Linkedin lawyer network.” How many connections do you have? What’s the value of that?
    Currently 9385 direct LinkedIn connections of which 4600 are attorneys. http://tinyurl.com/ot3umw …..
    The network is valuable in all aspects of law practice … rainmaking … finding a colleague to share expertise …
    The network is valuable in all aspects of law practice … learning about how other lawyers work and position selves …
    The network has also allowed me to branch into practice areas I couldn’t have handled on my own
    Non-lawyer clients also find me on LinkedIn – pretty frequently really
     
  12. Why did you decide to write a book about Web 2.0 for lawyers instead of using Web 2.0 to transmit the same knowledge?
    Many asked for a book. I use my blog and Twitter and I have a new webinar series upcoming – http://tinyurl.com/obo377
    Many lawyers use my social media activity as a model … which is flattering
     
  13. I’m sure it is. You blog at The Linkedin Lawyer (http://bit.ly/YTEf7). How do you decide what to write about?
    I use social media to listen for hot topics, and I do a lot of speaking, webinars, interviews and media …
    Many topics come to me … lawyers often ask how I have time to do this and practice … so I put together a webinar …
    With the blog I try to stay focused on social media and the legal profession
     
  14. It’s full of useful advice. Other than Twitter and LinkedIn, what Web 2.0 tools add the most value to your practice?
    The power of web 2.0 is viral marketing. My new biz with @StephenFairley will inspire …..
    … inspire individuals to be marketers of our clients … if anyone has forwarded an email to their friends you know ….
    if anyone has forwarded an email to their friends they know what viral marketing is about …
    Facebook is also really underutilized … Facebook has great multi-media potential.
    Web 2.0 tools for lawyers are powerful … but lawyers have to move past some of the tired imagery used for years
    Web 2.0 has transformed me from a lawyer who just passed the Bar into a lawyer with a national reputation …
     
  15. You’ve answered this in part, but what’s the real impact on referrals/client engagements from your Web 2.0 activities?
    The real impact in terms of referrals has been to move from getting referrals into becoming a nationwide referral ntwk …
    Now clients want to engage a “lawyer of my stature” for matters that may be media-friendly or otherwise newsworthy …
    Its pretty amazing, and I’m not sure this journey would even be possible without Web 2.0
     
  16. And you are transforming it as well. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Everything we do affects our brand. If I’m litigating, talking with clients …
    … writing articles or building relationships it is all brand. So I guess all my waking hours … unless I’m fishing.
     
  17. Depends on who you’re fishing with…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    I think the most significant issue facing the legal profession is transparency …
    As consumers get more sophisticated, we need new ways across the understanding gap between lawyers and non-lawyers …
    Of course there have been great lawyers forever … and we could videotape them all day and clients would get value ….
    But now we are in a new era of transparency … and there are a lot of areas in the profession where light has yet to shine
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    In 10 years – much more transparent, much more specialized, more smaller firms and a harder look by clients at billing …
    “Partnering with clients” and social media trends will change how firms interact with clients … at least I hope so
     
  19. You’re helping bring those changes about…. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I would spend more time on anti-poverty and international development work, like http://greennamibia.blogspot.com/ …
    I am honored to be a lawyer however … and working with the tools of law and policy is where I want to be
     
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    I’d like to be remembered as a kind teacher and a willing listener …. as someone who loved his kids passionately
     
  21. You mentioned fishing. What else do you do when you’re not working?
    I played college baseball and I’m really into coaching my son (8) in Little League when I’m not working …
    He has a Japanese windup and 4 pitches … I’m a recovered vegetarian and I just got 100% on my hunting license exam.
     
  22. We’ll look for him in a few years… Our last question: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    I’d tell law students to develop biz skills and legal skills. Learn how to make rain. …
    Students should understand we are all entrepreneurs, even if we work at a firm …
    Students looking for jobs are more likely to find “of counsel” relationships and will likely “eat what you kill” …
    Rather than stepping off the graduation stage into a super salary – smaller firms are leery about spending time training …
    and students will have a better time of it pulling their own weight. In their fist job and throughout their careers.

That’s great advice. Thank you very much for giving us a great 22nd 22 Tweets Twitterview!

It was my pleasure Lance. Thank you for the kind words, and I’m very flattered to be part of 22 Tweets. 

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