@AKunkel_GPLaw

October 26th, 2010

Anne Kunkel

Commercial real estate, agriculture and transactional lawyer

Partner, Givens Pursley LLP

Board Member, Sustainable Futures

Today we’re tweeting w/ Idaho RE lawyer, foodie & winie, & Mountain States Super Lawyers “Rising Star in real estate”

  1. @AKunkel_GPLaw, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @AKunkel_GPLaw?
    Second year partner at a mid-size full service firm, in Boise, Idaho, married to a State Appellate PD, 3 cats, 1 dog.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    Commercial real estate, ag law and biz/corp transactions, lending, with a good measure of liquor licensing thrown in
  3. Everything is better with a good measure of liquor licensing…. What type of clients do you represent?
    Entrepreneurs, banks, restaurateurs, business folks, farmers, you name it, no one kind of client, peeps who want to do deals
  4. That’s a diverse group. What is the single most important legal issue affecting them?
    Lack of available financing. Deals there, pple want to them, but finding $ is impossible, multifamily sector is strong tho
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    It may seem expensive but it’s a lot cheaper to do the deal right first than litigate about it later. Sorry litigator tweeps
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    BoDo, mixed use prjct w/ enviro, bond, reg, city development participation, finance elements. gr8 exp 4 then baby lawyer
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    being dealmaker instead of dealbreaker. Clients don’t want lawyers killing deals, think outside the box to get things done
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    REO properties, smaller one off transactions, business restructuring. No, practice was 80% finance before Gr8 Recession
  9. You touched on this briefly: how is the economic crisis affecting your clients? Are you seeing any signs of recovery?
    Lack of financing stopped deals. Yes, creative financing helping deals 2 get some traction. Non RE biz and HC pretty strong
  10. You’re on the Board of Sustainable Futures (http://bit.ly/bmYue4). How does that experience make you a better lawyer?
    Important to realize its not all about making $, but helping people. It humbles you, puts even the bad times in perspective
  11. How is real estate law evolving in response to the growing demand for green building and sustainability?
    lot of uncertainty b/c of differing standards. Hinders decision making, a great time for RE attys to counsel and advise.
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I am a “dirt/business lawyer” with a niche specialty in liquor, liquor licenses that is.
  13. How do you generally market your practice? Does social media play a big part in your marketing efforts?
    Good wrk, word of mouth, prof org m-ships/r-ships, community involvement. Still getting handle on how 2 best use FB & Twtr
  14. How long have you been active on Twitter? Has your Twitter strategy changed over that time?
    bit over a yr. Use more actively for info; thought sharing, communication, connection with community, no longer on sidelines
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    some based on website 411, but rly allows me 2 keep in touch w peers leading 2 referrals. Relationships bring clients
  16. Indeed. Let’s switch gears here: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Maintaining quality standards in a super fast communication world. Good work still takes time, clients need to understand
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Billable hour will be exception, more flat fees, lifestyle choice will structure practice instead of $ no hard offices
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    independent wealth, no really, I’d love to go to culinary school, or event planning, using management skills I’ve learned
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    Prof: a person who gets things done, trustworthy. Personal: the most positive pessimist ever met, more than my job, sincere
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Worry about not working. Seriously, watch a lot of sports (Go UK!), golf (badly), volunteer, garden, search out delish food
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Its just $, don’t get lost in the stress, maintain r/ships, pple survived worse economy. Need to follow own advice at times
  22. Finally, what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Think of JD outside of the trad’l practice. JDs open lots of doors, not just law & Econ will get better, always does

Thank you so much, Anne, for your good advice and a great interview. I enjoyed learning about you and your practice

Thanks. This was good fun.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@caririncker

July 20th, 2010

Cari Rincker

Principal Attorney at Rincker Law, PLLC

Illinois Farmgirl living in NYC

SimAngus Cattle Owner

Livestock Judge

Today we’re tweeting with Illinois farmgirl turned New York-based agriculture and environmental lawyer @CariRincker

  1. @CariRincker thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @CariRincker?
    Thanks for inviting me today for the Twitterview.
    I’m a midwestern #beef #cattle girl living in #NYC who is passionate about the #agriculture industry and #food security.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @RinckerLaw serves clients involved in every segment of the #agriculture industry including #food, #fiber, and #biofuels.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    @RinckerLaw has a wide variety of clients including #ag producers, multi-national #food companies, & #fashion designers
  4. A broad mix indeed. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Complying with stringent #environmental regulations imposed on the federal, state and local level.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I tell each new client of @RinckerLaw that I need open communication to ensure that I get an accurate picture of the facts.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I have really enjoyed my work with international #food, #ag, and #biotech companies with various contract and #trade issues.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    My #farm roots helped mold me into a honest, hard-working attorney who truly understands & loves the #ag community. #agchat
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Contract drafting- No, that isn’t typical since #ag producers usually do business with a handshake. See http://tiny.cc/7n952
  9. Tell us about your work as an advisor for the Permanent Mission of the Marshall Islands to the United Nations
    – I love it! I sat on the floor of the #UN General Assembly and gave voting recommendations to Ambassador Alfred Capelle.
  10. That’s cool! Ag law has no doubt changed significantly since you became a lawyer. What’s the next frontier of ag law?
    I anticipate that more #ag producers will participate in the #renewable #energy movement (e.g., #wind and #solar #farms).
  11. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    #Aglaw is an industry based practice area that touches upon nearly every kind of law. http://tiny.cc/d2jqg #agchat #foodchat
  12. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    I became active during a #WY blizzard a yr ago. I now realize that it is a completely different than #FB -news & networking.
  13. Agreed. Congrats on your one-year blogging anniversary (http://bit.ly/4cP09A)! How has your blog changed in that time?
    Thanks! I hope my #agblog is informative for #food & #ag folks. For my second year I hope to implement some video blogging.
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements, if any, have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    Twitter isn’t about “who you know”-it’s about “who you want to know.” I have met clients & lawyers who have sent me clients.
  15. Well put. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I represent my brand 24/7/365 whether I am tweeting from my #iphone4, in the courtroom, or having cocktails with friends.
  16. a recipe for success…. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    – There are too many lawyers graduating with heavy student loan debt. There are not enough high salaried jobs at #BigLaw.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Tough question. I think the legal industry will become more niche-based and client-focused over the next decade.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I have an advanced degree in #beef #cattle nutrition so I would probably be teaching animal science or working in extension.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    Someone who spent her life trying to improve the #ag industry so the world could have safe, affordable, & abundant #food.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I enjoy judging #livestock shows, playing #volleyball, distance #running, and watching the #Yankees from the cheap seats.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Roll up your sleeves and learn to hustle. Pursue your passions and don’t get discouraged because perseverance never fails.
  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Give it everything you have for three years — it will be over before you know it. Get to know your classmates and profs.

Thanks for that great advice and for the interview. I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice.

I enjoyed the Twitterview! Thanks for the invitation.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@agrilawyer

November 24th, 2009

grc6197-raysor_craig_p_p2Craig Raysor

Agricultural and Food Lawyer in the Metropolitan Memphis Area

Attorney at Gillon & Associates, PLLC

Author of legal blog Seed Law

Today we’re tweeting with Memphis-based agriculture and food lawyer @agrilawyer

  1. @agrilawyer thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @agrilawyer?
    Thank you for having me,I would say I am a good Southern Gentleman that enjoys the good life overall,no matter how tough the times.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I mainly focus on representing agriculture and food clients in corporate, political, regulatory and international trade matters.
  3. What type of agriculture and food clients do you represent?
    Anybody from individual clients that need a will or a pot-bellied pig saved to start-ups to large national trade associations.
  4. That’s a broad range…. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    For the larger clients , it would be Lobbying or preparatory work for various governmental programs, as well as interpreting regs.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I just tell them that we need to keep open communication both ways, and never hesitate to call or stop by.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I assisted in getting the govt to overturn a reg that would have taken payments from land that was taken from and leased back . . .
    . . . to farmers throughout the nation by the govt. We did some client meetings with entire rural communities at their fairgrounds.
  7. Quite different from the conference room…. Why do your clients hire you?
    Specialization, accessibility, and honesty. I’m a lawyer because I want to be a part of a community, not to take from it.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    Oddly its commercial litigation, and no, not really. The volatility in the cotton market left many ginner clients needing a lawyer.
  9. What is the principal business issue your clients face? How do you help them resolve it?
    Like most, its what to do with scarce resources. Connect them to money or help with ways to keep costs low, preferably the former.
  10. That makes sense. In what other ways has the ongoing economic crisis affected your clients?
    It has definitely taken a hit, many sources of funds for our start-up bioenergy clients has dried up, so we have to become creative.
  11. What would you say is the next big frontier in agricultural law and policy?
    Bridging the gap between consumer and the agricultural/food industry. This will change the policy decisions re: commodities & trade.
  12. How do you market your practice?
    Through twitter, the website, farm trade groups, and good ol’ word of mouth (which I value the most). .
  13. Besides Twitter, do you use other Web 2.0 tools to market your practice?
    blog at www.seedlaw.blogspot.com, I tooled with FB, but feel its too cluttered for bus. I have been on FB personally for a few yrs
  14. What specific impact on referrals and/or client engagements have you realized from Web 2.0 activities?
    I have not gained a terrible amount of clients yet, but I have connected very well with potential clients and journalists.
  15. That alone is very valuable…. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    You are dead on. Any moment that I am not focusing directly on a paid client matter. Branding is huge concern for a small niche firm
  16. Indeed. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    A big problem I have noticed is a disconnect between the newer generation lawyers and older gen. lawyers . . .
    . . . I have been fortunate to have great mentors, but many other young lawyers have not. Requires work from both ends.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Unfortunately, I think it will circle back to what we were, we will dumb back down from lessons we learned in this turbulent market.
    I’m obviously speaking in generalities.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    A chocolatier – me and a candy oven with hard rock playing on the radio making specialty chocolate footballs.
  19. Sweet! (no, I really couldn’t resist…). How do you want to be remembered?
    Haha, I understand. Hopefully as an awesome Chocolatier/ Ag Attorney that was a caring husband and father when that time comes.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I spend time running, weightlifting, reading history books, watching my wife at roller derby. I want to get back into Rugby soon.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    You are a walking business, and your integrity and competence is your brand. Go sell it even if you are looking for another job.
  22. And our last question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Law School Students -Take advantage of the ability to “free”-think b/c most of ur law prac, ur thinking is paid for by someone else.

Very valuable advice. Thank you for tweeting with me today; I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice

Thanks a lot Lance, I enjoyed the interview and I look forward to seeing the other ones with lawyers in the near future.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter