@andrewmmorris

February 22nd, 2011

Andrew M Morris

Solicitor – Advocate in the Criminal Courts

Part time composer for film and TV

Singer / songwriter / guitarist / weissenborn player

Today we’re tweeting UK crim lawyer, singer/songwriter/guitarist & former support artist for Peter Green & Friends @andrewmmorris

  1. @Andrewmmorris, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Andrewmmorris?
    I am a solicitor advocate (Criminal Law) by day and a singer/songwriter and composer by night.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I am a criminal solicitor specialising in Crown Court cases and representing those charged with serious criminal offences
  3. Exactly what type of clients do you represent?
    Those charged with criminal offences, but these can range from the very minor to the most serious
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    the right to defend themselves against allegations to protect their freedom
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I don’t have a set phrase about what I tell a client, it depends on each clients situation as I have to act in their best interest
  6. Makes sense…. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    This is really difficult for me to go into these cases. I have a duty of client confidentiality. But think Rumpole of the Bailey!!
  7. Fabulous! And that last tweet may also work as an answer to this question: Why do your clients hire you?
    am not sure why they hire me.I like to think Its because the client has confidence in my ability to defend them passionately
  8. That’s a strong selling point…. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    don’t have those kind of stats but there is always need for a criminal lawyer, as you can imagine especially in the current climate
  9. Indeed. Tell us a bit about your successful second career as a singer / songwriter / musician: http://mysp.ac/gs7oAJ
    Yes, played at glastonbury, supported @MarillionOnline , supported Peter Green, released two EPs, now writing for @Imagem_Music
  10. Wow. Does composing and performing music make you a better lawyer? In what ways?
    Performing certainly does, gives you confidence in public speaking and in court. Also teaches you team work when playing in a band
  11. How do you manage to juggle two very demanding careers? Do you think you’ll ever have to choose between the two?
    When you do two things you love its never hard to find time to do both, although my wife might disagree(!)
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I say am a lawyer by day, musician by night like a wierd superhero. People’s reactions are different but most people are intrigued.
  13. I certainly was…. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    My objectives were to meet like minded people and learn more from others and as a forum to express myself and to promote my music.
  14. What does the leadership of your firm think of your Twitter / other social media presence?
    I don ‘t represent my firm on Twitter. I only represent myself and my music.
  15. I see. All the same, have your Web 2.0 activities led to any opportunities for your practice?
    Not yet!!
  16. Perhaps one day…. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    For Criminal law its the Legal Aid budget in the UK , which is undergoing consultations to shake up the fee structure.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Solicitors and barristers profession may be merged or at least they will be working together under the same professional body.
  18. I probably know the answer to this one, but what would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    yes its pretty obvious! A songwriter or composer – but I am very happy with my career as it stands and have never had to choose
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As a lawyer who cared about the cases I was involved in and always gave 100%. A Musicians who wrote a few decent songs!
  20. What do you do when you’re not working (assuming there is such a time…)?
    Writing songs, composing for Film and TV, playing live. I also like to keep up to date with legal developments, caselaw etc.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Stick with it as there is always the need for solicitors and lawyers in out litigious culture these days.We are a vital trade
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    That getting any experience you can is vital to securing a training contract, be proactive and believe in your abilities

Two good pieces of advice. Thank you for tweeting with me today; enjoyed learning about you and your practice

thanks for the interview, really enjoyed it.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@rbratby

February 8th, 2011

Rob Bratby

International telecoms and technology lawyer

Partner at Olswang LLP, London

Author of Watching the Connectives legal blog

Today we’re tweeting w/ international telecoms and tech lawyer and recent convert to legal blogging @rbratby

  1. @rbratby, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @rbratby?
    I am a partner in the London office of the international TMT law firm Olswang
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    My practice is a mix of corporate and commercial deals with some regulatory advice
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Mainly telecoms and technology companies
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    It differs – for some investment and growth, for others cost-reduction and for some regulation
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I will do everything I can to ensure that at the end of this project you want to instruct me on the next one
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I helped a UK mobile network outsource its fixed voice and broadband business
  7. That must have been a complex deal. Why do your clients hire you?
    yes – challenging, but great team here and at the client….
    …Expertise, experience, enthusiasm, communication, cost-control (and modesty)
  8. :-) What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    A mix of M&A, commercial (e.g.outsourcing) and regulatory / advisory work. Yes
  9. You’re on the board of the Communications Management Association. Tell us about that organization and its objectives.
    ‘best practice, knowledge networks and government representation in communications, collaboration and cloud services.’…
    now part of British Computer Society
  10. You’ve written about the Digital Economy Act 2010 on your blog. What is it? What does it mean for your clients?
    It is the front line between telecoms networks and rights owners: who takes responsibility for stopping IP piracy
  11. How did your experience as a commander in the British Army influence your legal practice? Does it make you a better lawyer?
    Staying cool and calm under pressure with little or no sleep is remarkably good training for law
  12. Indeed! How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    International telecoms and technology lawyer
  13. You recently began blogging on telecom and tech issues (http://bit.ly/grkaGi). What led you to start? Who do you write for?
    I set up a blog for my wife www.lisabratby.wordpress.com, and thought I should keep her company. Still finding audience
  14. What does your firm’s leadership think of your active social media presence?
    Olswang encourages innovation, so watching with interest.
  15. Nice. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    It seems to me to be much more about contact and (re) engagement.
  16. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    How to deliver greater value at a lower cost
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    I wish I knew. But I predict that the global top ten law firms will include at least one from each of India and China
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Gardener
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    As decent, kind and fair.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Spend time with my wife, family, friends and dog. Cycle, ski, garden, travel and go to the theatre
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Explore all opportunities. After the dot.com crash I got an MBA – there is always a silver lining
  22. That brings us to our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Work hard, but remember to make good friends and enjoy life.

That’s useful advice. Thanks very much for tweeting with us today, and telling us about you and your practice

thank you

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
 

@legallyerin

February 1st, 2011

Erin Russell

Atlanta and Chicago-based personal injury lawyer

Owner, The Russell Group

Author of law and foodie blog LegallyErin

Today we’re tweeting w/Atlanta & Chicago-based attorney @legallyerin: litigator, counselor, foodie, amateur photographer, gadget nut

  1. @Legallyerin, thank you for joining us on Twitter. Tell us, who is @Legallyerin?
    I’m Erin Russell. I’m a litigator, foodie and amateur photog. I’m licensed to practice in both Illinois and Georgia.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I recently launched The Russell Group. We focus on wrongful death, injury and business litigation & women’s legal issues.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    We represent people who have been injured, their families, business owners and victims of domestic & sexual violence.
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    My injury clients need fair compensation. My business clients need to protect their assets while they grow their dreams.
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That our relationship is based on trust and on truth. Both are essential to a successful attorney-client relationship.
  6. Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had.
    I recently handled a wrongful death case involving a man killed in a trucking accident on a snowy road. Really tragic.
  7. Why do your clients hire you?
    They hire me because they trust and like me. They know I am smart and qualified, and that I really care about their cases.
  8. What’s the most active area of your practice at the current time? Is that typical?
    My injury practice is growing, but my corporate practice is, too. So many smart people are starting new businesses now.
    Typical, hard to say. But entrepreneurship is definitely on the rise.
  9. That’s a positive sign…. What would you say is the most difficult aspect of being a personal injury lawyer?
    Gathering, quantifying and assigning $ value to my clients’ suffering. It is the nature of the practice, but it is hard.
  10. Can only imagine. You represent attorneys on ethics / malpractice. What led you to that work? Have you always done it?
    I love representing fellow attorneys, and advising them on ethics issues. Been doing it 3 or so years. …
    I started doing legal mal defense work in Atlanta. Now advise on social media, advertising, conflicts, all areas of ethics.
    I love representing fellow attorneys and am very active on ethics matters.
  11. Tell us about the women’s legal services you offer. What do they entail? Who are your clients? How do you help them?
    I’m excited about the women’s legal services part of my practice. It is really two-fold. First, I represent female entrepreneurs…
    and assist them in starting their businesses. Second, I represent women who are victims of domestic or sexual violence…
    on a pro bono, flat fee or sliding fee basis depending on income. Finances should not dictate whether a woman can be safe.
  12. How do you describe what you do to people you meet at a cocktail party?
    I tell them I do litigation and talk about my corporate practice. People like talking about their dreams and goals…
    The best way to engage them is to talk about what they need, and what I can do to help them get it. It’s a lot of fun.
  13. Indeed. When did you become active on Twitter? What were your objectives then? Have they changed?
    About a year ago. My objectives were then as they are now: To engage people, know them, and learn about them. …
    Marketing rules for attorneys are tough. More so in some states than others. Social media presents challenges. …
    But if you show a genuine interest in people, and form real relationships, social and business opportunities follow.
  14. Makes sense. You blog at Legally Erin (http://bit.ly/blQqsG). Who do you write it for? Why should they read it?
    Lawyers, people who like law, people who are curious about law. It’s no accident that so much of what we see on tv…
    film and on the news relates to law. It captivates people. It’s important and affects real people every day. …
    I write to inform, entertain and engage people. To create dialogue. They should read my blog because it is fun, accurate…
    heartfelt and engaging. I love suggestions and comments. It’s a way to open discussion and share.
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities led to any additional referrals or client engagements?
    Absolutely. The Web is how people come together now. I get calls, messages on Twitter and Facebook and emails often…
    from people I meet online asking for legal advice, seeking representation, or seeking to refer someone to me. …
    It’s all about the relationships, and about letting people discover that you’re sincerely concerned about their issues.
  16. Congrats on that. Let’s switch gears: What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Economics, to be sure. The billable hour is no longer king. People are attracted to alternative menus of services …
    as well as alternative payment arrangements. Flat fee representation is becoming very popular, and is antithetical …
    to the old-school law firm model of practice. People are becoming more savvy consumers of legal services, and that’s good…
    In order to really thrive, firms will need to keep that in mind going forward, & continue to innovate delivery of services.
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    It will be leaner, more flexible. Though traditional practice will continue, there will be more room for creativity. …
    There will be a much greater presence of virtual practices, and more accessibility for the average person.
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    That’s so hard to say. I love being a lawyer and feel so proud and privileged to be able to do so. If I couldn’t do this…
    maybe I’d try to be a chef or a photographer. But this is what I truly love, and wouldn’t want to do anything else.
  19. How do you want to be remembered?
    I hope to be remembered as someone who did good, who gave freely, had good intentions, and forgave easily. …
    I hope I eased someone’s suffering, helped someone prosper, and made a difference in someone’s life.
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I try to create something beautiful. It balances the stresses of litigation. I cook. I take photographs. …
    I undertake art projects of varying degrees of difficulty to varying degrees of success. I read voraciously.
  21. What advice can you pass along to lawyers currently under- or unemployed due to the economic crisis?
    Remain visible in the profession. Volunteer. Be active in bar association events. Align yourself with other lawyers. …
    Also, try to remain positive, at least publicly. Things will and do turn around, and you have more control than you think.
  22. And our final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Work hard. You’re going to love doing this if you do it right. Get real experience. Clerk. Volunteer. Ask questions. …
    Also, be sure to examine many practice areas so you end up engaged in one you truly enjoy. And always be honest & ethical.

That’s good advice. Thanks much for tweeting with us today; I enjoyed learning more about you and your practice

Thank you for having me! I enjoyed it very much! Cheers!

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter