@cstegmaier

May 28th, 2009

stegmaier_photo1Christian Stegmaier

Retail/Hospitality and Appellate Lawyer based in Columbia, South Carolina

Shareholder and Marketing Partner at Collins and Lacy

Today, we’re tweeting with @cstegmaier, a retail/hospitality and appellate lawyer who also tweets for his firm, @collinsandlacy

  1. @cstegmaier, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @cstegmaier?
    I am a partner @ Collins & Lacy, an SC business litigation firm. I am also the marketing partner. http://tinyurl.com/l3h9w2
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I do 2 things: appellate & represent retailers and hospitality-related entities doing business in SC in lit matters.

  3. Tell us a little more about the clients you represent
    On the lit side, I represent hotels, restaurants, live music venues/promoters, food service providers, & retailers.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Getting a handle on the new electronic disco rules. SC is 2 steps from adopting the federal rules…
    … Also, Medicare Set Asides. What a jungle that is going to be.
  5. What then would you say is the most important business issue facing your clients?
    Retail & hospitality have taken tremendous hits in revenues this last year…
    … A main job of ours is to work hard to reduce defense & indemnity costs b/c they affect the bottom line.
  6. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    My mission/promise is this: I am going to be diligent, deliberate, decisive, responsive, & reliable.
  7. You said the economy is hitting your clients pretty hard. Just how bad is it for them right now?
    Everybody is watching their pennies. I do the same. We spend our clients’ money like it’s ours.
  8. Am sure they appreciate it (I know I would). Tell us about one of the more significant client representations you’ve had
    We rep the world’s largest music promoter, the nation’s largest private depart store retailer & the world’s leading hotel brand …
    … Protecting these brands is an awesome responsibility (and a lot of fun).
  9. That’s a great client list! Why do your clients hire you?
    We know our stuff. We are proactive. We are responsive. We are genuine. We tell the truth. Our bills are fair.
  10. How do you help your clients meet their business and strategic objectives?
    We get immersed in our clients’ businesses. We spend a lot time w/ them. We read everything about them. We know them …
    … Getting that kind of understanding of our clients’ businesses helps us help them.
  11. That must make a big difference in your ability to represent them…. How do you market your practice?
    Delivering great outcomes. Exceeding expectations. As well, we blog & Twitter. We do a weekly email update to clients …
    … We are more focused on satisfying existing clients that always being on the hunt for new ones. We’ve got a great book …
    … Clients get tired of being repped by “the finders.” … Our current clients are our priorities.
    … Our firm has also developed a Facebook page. It’s a nice compliment to our existing website. http://tinyurl.com/lktalf
  12. Impressive mktg program! You blog at South Carolina Retail & Hospitality Law (http://bit.ly/g8G4D). Who should read it?
    Everybody! I love the traffic …
    …Seriously, if you do business in SC as a retailer/hospitality co., we keep you apprised of legal issues that arise here.
  13. You also tweet as @collinsandlacy. What is the difference in the two feeds?
    @cstegmaier relates to my personal brand/practice. @collinsandlacy is our firm wide message.
  14. Why did you opt for separate feed from your firm rather posting the same tweets under your own name?
    We have 30 lawyers in 3 cities across the state. We use the @collinsandlacy platform to promote all of our practice areas.
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    We are primarily interested about getting the word out about our firm & its capabilities …
    Our social media activities have noticeably increased our brand identity. A lot more folks know about us.
  16. With two Twitter feeds, the blog, etc., how much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Approx 1-2 hours re: direct activities. Of course, it can be said that everything you do relates to your brand identity.
  17. Agreed. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    For younger attys, managing their debt. I feel for those folks…
    … For mid-levels and partners, maintaining the pace & staying fresh. It’s a marathon, not a sprint.
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    For firms repping institutional clients, you better have substantive content available digitally for free…
    Additionally, ADR (including appellate ADR) will become a larger presence …
    Also, the full serv. firm will become a thing of the past. Sophisticated clients want specialists at the top of their game.
  19. Those are some significant changes for the profession…. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I would trade places with a younger Greg Maddux in a second …
    … In real life: a hotel gm, restaurant owner, or in-house firm marketing coordinator.
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    One of the best things that can be said about you is that you were good & reliable …
    … I’d like to be remembered as being both.
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    South Carolina is a wonderful state. Our family loves to hit the road and discover SC from the mountains to the sea …
    I’ve also been teaching as an adjunct in hotel & restaurant law at the Univ. of S. C. That’s been a great experience.
  22. Our last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Borrow the minimal amt you can get away with. Consider taking time off between undergrad & law sch. Get some $$$ together.

That’s useful advice. Thank you very much for answering our questions and giving us a great twitterview today

Thanks so much. It was a pleasure!

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@downtownlawyer

May 26th, 2009

jodie_hill_disk_1843aJodie L. Hill

Associate, Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins, L.L.P.

Author of Downtown Lawyer law blog

 

 

 Today, we’re tweeting with @Downtownlawyer: lawyer, writer, blogger, do-it-yourself-er, kickball-playing extraordinaire

  1. @Downtownlawyer, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @Downtownlawyer?
    I’m an associate at a small law firm in Little Rock, AR. I write a blog (Downtown Lawyer), which focuses on AR legal issues.
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I handle a lot of cases regarding insurance coverage, construction defects, products liability, and MVAs.
     
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Most of my clients are insurance companies and their insureds.
     
  4. What’s the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Bad faith claims. Once an insurer denies a claim, even if done with the best of intentions, . . .
    . . . they’re potentially liable for bad faith. There’s absolutely no room for error.
     
  5. That sounds risky…. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
    As far as I can tell, none. My firm is busier than ever.
     
  6. That’s good to hear. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I explain that I have 2 clients—the insurer & the insured. I outline the limitations of my representation . . .
    . . . and explain that I cannot be involved in any dispute between the insured & the insurer.
     
  7. That’s a crucial point to make! What’s the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    My 1st client, as a law student, in litigation clinic. I helped a lady get guardianship of her grandson. . .
    . . . Helps me to remember that lawyers have a duty to help those in need.
     
  8. That’s a nice story. Why do your clients hire you?
    Because I take their concerns seriously, and I’m always available to answer their questions.
     
  9. How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    My firm hasn’t made any changes because our referrals have increased.
     
  10. You talk about referrals as a source of business. How do you market your practice?
    Mostly by continuing to do excellent work. Also through networking (in-person & social media) & writing my blog.
     
  11. You blog at Downtown Lawyer (http://bit.ly/150PrA). Who is it written for? Why should they read it?
    AR lawyers & anyone interested in AR law. It’s concise without a lot of BS :D
     
  12. What was your objective when you started blogging? Has it changed?
    I wanted to do something I love (writing), which would provide me a marketing tool. That goal hasn’t changed.
     
  13. Has blogging made you a better lawyer? How?
    Yes. I know a lot more about what’s going on in AR, the region, the nation, and the world.
     
  14. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand? 
    B/c I consider my work, my personality, everything about me to be my “brand”–so every minute of every day.
     
  15. Makes sense. Have your Web 2.0 activities had a direct impact on referrals / client engagements? 
    Not really. I haven’t been blogging long & I’ve been on Twitter even less. Relationships w/other attys have grown a lot.
     
  16. Am sure it will come. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession? 
    Lack of legal representation for those who cannot afford it.
     
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    I haven’t got a clue. I love reading/hearing what others think though.
     
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d be an English professor.
     
  19. Why did you become a lawyer?
    I was a paralegal for several years (at the same firm I’m at now). I loved what they did and wanted to do it too.
     
  20. Wow – that’s an even better story! How do you want to be remembered?
    As a fair attorney, who represented her clients well; and as a good friend, who was always ready for a laugh.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    I read a lot, watch TV, and play on the internet. I have 2 Cocker Spaniels that I spoil & a house that I’m still renovating.
     
  22. Last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Get some real-world experience before going to law school. It makes a world of difference in dealing w/stress of law school.

That’s great advice to close a great twitterview. Thank you very much for answering our questions today

 Thanks, Lance; I enjoyed it. 

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@TradeSecretLaw

May 21st, 2009

gibson__scott_fScott F. Gibson

Member, Gibson, Ferrin & Riggs, PLC

Trade Secrets, Employment Law, Biotechnology, Commercial Litigation Lawyer

Author of the BiziBoom blog

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @TradeSecretLaw: business lawyer, counselor, adviser, adjunct professor of law and wannabe chef and baker  

  1. @TradeSecretLaw, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @TradeSecretLaw?
    Husband (22 years on 5/22), father to four great young people, son, brother, uncle, friend. Oh, and I practice law for a living.
     
  2. 22 yrs on May 22? Revealed in a 22 Tweets interview? Wow! OK, tell us about your law practice.
    Intangible assets are 75% + of the value of a business. I protect those assets from employee disloyalty, theft, unfair competition.
     
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    My Firm represents growing businesses & their owners. We help them preserve, protect, & promote their business and personal needs.
     
  4. What would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Failure to plan. Many problems we see could have been avoided by implementing prudent legal and business practices.
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I will always shoot straight with you, even when you would rather hear something else. We want to be your attorneys for life.
     
  6. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    In my first solo trial, I defended the Arizona Supreme Court on a claim of wrongful termination. Defense verdict.
     
  7. No pressure there…. Why do your clients hire you?
    We focus on building our credibility and perceived expertise. Clients feel comfortable that we know how to fix their problems.
     
  8. How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    We teach correct principles, help clients learn new skills, and make introductions. We help clients implement needed changes.
     
  9. What led you to return to school for an LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics?
    When I read about the program, I had a strong impression, “You need to do this.” My wife, partners, & friends supported my decision.
     
  10. Go with your gut, I always say… How do you help your clients meet their business and strategic objectives?
    We take a long-term view: understand the business, learn their personal objectives, & plan for the future.Then implement the plan.
     
  11. I’m sure they find that very valuable. How do you market your practice?
    Primarily referrals. We are moving into Web 2.0 marketing — press releases, blogs, websites, e-books, newsletters, e-mail, etc.
     
  12. You’ve begun to blog at BiziBoom (http://bit.ly/WEgBZ). Who is it written for? Why should they read it?
    BiziBoom is for people who want to build their business, but are caught up in the everyday routine. It helps them focus.
     
  13. What was your objective when you started blogging? Has it changed?
    Three-fold objective is unchanged: (1) provide useful info, (2) differentiate from competitors, and (3) satisfy my urge to write.
     
  14. Has blogging made you a better lawyer? How?
    Blogging helps crystallize my thinking, so yes it makes me a better lawyer. It also helps clients perceive me as a better lawyer.
     
  15. That makes sense. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Difficult to say. Usually about two hours per day, sometimes more
     
  16. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    Web 2.0 has helped us think differently about how we represent clients. It helps us focus on client needs and on cross-marketing.
     
  17. Interesting observation. Let’s switch gears: what’s the most significant issue facing the legal profession today?
    Lawyers need to think differently about how we serve clients. Focus on client needs, solve their problems, and provide value.
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Those who differentiate will prosper. Services are intangible and difficult to value. Give clients a reason to value your services.
     
  19. That’s great advice. We may already know the answer to this, but what would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Business fascinates me. I love learning, writing, and teaching.
     
  20. How do you want to be remembered?
    A man who lived his religion, loved his wife and children, and treated everyone honorably and with kindness.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Time with family (especially my wife) is the best. I enjoy reading, writing, sci-fi, sports, cooking, baking, and traveling.
     
  22. The baking intrigues me… Last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Focus on a practice area and become a recognized expert. Differentiate yourself to clients, referral sources. Learn how to market.

That’s great advice. Thank you very much for answering our questions today

Thank you for the invitation, @22twts. I have enjoyed the experience.

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@constructionlaw

May 19th, 2009

hill-036Christopher G. Hill

Principal, Durrette Bradshaw PLC

Virgina Business Magazine “Legal Elite” in Construction Law

Author of the Construction Law Musings blog

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @constructionlaw: construction lawyer, commercial litigator and one of VA Biz Mag’s “Legal Elite”

  1. @Constructionlaw, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. In 140 characters, who is @Constructionlaw?
    A guy who enjoys representing construction folks, enjoys the interaction of law practice, and is out to help clients succeed
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I work with all “levels” of construction pros in an attempt to keep them out of trouble and go to court if necessary
     
  3. What are some specific types of clients you represent?
    Mostly subcontractors and suppliers, but some general contractors and engineers
     
  4. And what would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Right now, getting paid. I see green construction being one on the horizon
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    That depends. I always focus on their issues. The first question I ask is what their biggest issue is.
     
  6. What’s the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Recently I represented a pipeline company in a big suit in Federal Court. I think all of them are significant though
     
  7. Good point…. Why do your clients hire you?
    I think because of my expertise and that they know I have their interest, even more than my financial stake, at heart.
     
  8. How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    I am telling them all to be proactive and think hard about their business practices . . ..
    If I can help them through their financial bumps, I feel good and they tend to come back
     
  9. Makes perfect sense. Congrats on joining the faculty of Solo Practice University. What do you teach for them?
    Construction Practice 101 (or how to get, serve and keep a construction client) #SPU
     
  10. How do you help your clients meet their business and strategic objectives?
    By reviewing their business practices and contracts from a risk management perspective . . .
    and working with another great lawyer at my firm on other issues
     
  11. Hmmm – a future 22 Tweets twitterviewee, perhaps… How do you market your practice?
    presenting to the local AGC chapter and being active in the AGC. my blog #SPU, talking to people
     
  12. Tell us about your blog, Construction Law Musings (http://bit.ly/17FHYY). Who is it written for?
    Anyone interested in the construction industry and its marketing and legal issues, from contractors to lawyers.
     
  13. What was your objective when you started blogging? Has that changed?
    I need an objective? (grin) Actually, it was to get my thoughts out in a less formal and more immediate way…
    My objective now that I do that is to have Musings be a resource
    For more on this see @lawfirmblogger’s great interview at http://bit.ly/XCHzv    

  14. It certainly would seem that your blog is a valuable industry resource. Has blogging made you a better lawyer? How?
    Yes. It keeps me up to date on issues and through my guest posts teaches me something on at least a weekly basis.
     
  15. Your use of guest posts is great. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Who knows, at least an hour, on days like today when I was part of a panel at the AGC, much more.
     
  16. All time well spent I’m sure. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    Yes, I have gotten more calls from web hits and have made numerous connections that I never would have had.
     
  17. Let’s switch gears a bit: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Besides the economy and the need to retool our business model. Well, the economy and the need to retool our business model.
     
  18. Indeed. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Who knows? My view is that there will be fewer mammoth firms and more solos and small firms due to client demand.
     
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Wow, probably a nutty philosophy professor, that’s all that my degree qualified me to do besides law school :)
     
  20. Now I *get* the #SPU gig…. How do you want to be remembered?
    (smile) As a guy who helped people and had fun doing it but mostly as a great dad and husband.
     
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Chase the kids, study for the LEED AP exam (until June 13) try to learn to shoot sporting clays & spend time with my family
     
  22. Good luck w/LEED exam! Final question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Be ready to hit the ground running and if necessary start your own firm. . .
    Try to get as much practical experience as your school will let you and mostly have fun with it.

Great advice. Thank you very much for your time today; you gave us another great 22 Tweets twitterview!

you’re welcome. Thanks for the opportunity

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@erikjheels

May 14th, 2009

erikjheels-avatar-313x313-157kErik J. Heels

Trademark, domain name, patent lawyer and more

Founder, Clock Tower Law Group

Avid blogger

MIT Engineer

Today, we’re tweeting with @erikjheels: lawyer, electrical engineer, columnist, Red Sox fan, former Air Force Captain and more

  1. @Erikjheels, thank you for joining us today on 22 Tweets. Tell us: who is @Erikjheels?
    Trademark, domain name, and patent lawyer; MIT ’88. Red Sox fan, music lover, author. See http://ErikJHeels.com for details.
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    @ClockTowerLaw helps startups acquire and defend US and foreign trademarks, domain names, and patents. This is our 9th year.
     
  3. What type of startups do you represent?
    @ClockTowerLaw‘s clients are mostly high-tech startups, and 3 clients have been acquired by public companies, which is nice.
     
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    #Twittersquatting, the equivalent of cybersquatting. Trademarks are being hijacked on Twitter and other social networks.
     
  5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    There are good and bad lawyers at big and small law firms. We like to think we’re good lawyers at a small law firm.
     
  6. Your track record supports that statement…. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    All clients are significant. But http://RightMedia.com was acquired by @Yahoo, http://Inceptor.com by http://Verizon.com.
     
  7. Agreed. Why do your clients hire you?
    Because we understand how IP works in the real world. We understand entrepreneurs because we’ve started our own companies.
     
  8. Hard to argue w/that! How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    Our established clients are doing fine in this recession. For new clients, we offer http://FreeTrademarksForStartups.com.
     
  9. How did your life as an engineer prepare you to help clients as a patent / trademark attorney?
    Like other @MIT_alumni, I learned how to break complex problems into smaller solvable ones. IP law is a lot like engineering.
     
  10. That’s an interesting perspective. What led you to found your own law firm, @ClockTowerLaw, in 2001?
    I was fortunate to be able to ride out Web 1.0. When that wave crashed (or bubble burst), I decided to be a full time lawyer.
     
  11. Your resume reads like an adventure novel. What’s the next big adventure you’re planning?
    Most technology that is foisted on lawyers sucks. I’m going to spin out a software project or two to try to fix that.
     
  12. Look forward to hearing more about that. How do you market your practice?
    I believe in a balanced marketing portfolio. A little bit of everything. Twitter is hot now, but it’s not the be-all end-all.
     
  13. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    I get up at 5:30am each day to do stuff like this Twitter interview. Probably an hour per day before I get to the office.
     
  14. Time well spent…. You’ve been blogging since 1987 (not a typo) at http://bit.ly/oNAlP. What keeps you going?
    I do add legacy stuff to my blog, hence the 1966-present copyright notice. I enjoy writing, so blogging is a good fit for me.
     
  15. You’re clearly actively engaged in social media. Who should read your blog / follow your tweets / subscribe to your feed?
    I don’t really care who reads my blog or tweets. I write for my own edification. If others benefit from it, that’s gravy.
     
  16. Beyond general branding, what’s been the impact of your social media activities on your law practice?
    Since launching http://FreeTrademarksForStartups.com via Twitter in 11/2008, we’ve been adding one new client per week.
     
  17. Wow. That is impressive. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Learning to speak Plain English. The @creativecommons copyright licenses are a good example of anti-legalese legal writing.
     
  18. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Smaller firms in the AmLaw 100. More focus on international issues such as PCT for patents, Madrid Protocol for trademarks.
     
  19. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d teach startups to grow by using balanced marketing portfolios. In my spare time, I’d be rocking with http://MCatsBand.org.
     
  20. Looks like you’re doing some of that already! How do you want to be remembered?
    @ErikJHeels was a good friend.
     
  21. Other than rockin’ with the MCats band, what do you do when you’re not working?
    Hacking with computers, writing, baseball, and seeking the perfect Hammond B-3 sound on my keyboard.
     
  22. Last question for you: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Be yourself. That’s what my mentor (Tom Bohan of http://mtcforensics.com) told me. Be yourself, and you’ll be fine.

That’s great advice. Thank you very much for answering our questions today; this was a great twitterview

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@chrischeatham

May 12th, 2009

c-cheathamChris Cheatham

Construction attorney

LEED Accredited Professional (AP)

Associate, Crowell & Moring

Author of the Green Building Law Update blog

Today, we’re tweeting with @chrischeatham: construction attorney, LEED AP, author of the Green Building Law Update blog, and more

  1. @Chrischeatham, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Who is the person behind @Chrischeatham?
    I’m a construction attorney concerned about green building legal issues on the horizon.
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I do construction litigation primarily. We handle big and small construction delay cases.
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    Contractors, sureties, owners. Often against federal or state govts.
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting your clients?
    Responsibility for LEED certification. Or at least it will be…
  5. Sounds like you’ll be busy for a while…. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    You have to understand the owner’s expectations og a green building project to manage risk.
    I also tell clients you have to understand the owner’s expectations OF a green building project to manage risk.
  6. :-) What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Easy. We represented numerous insurers in the Katrina litigation. Would’ve been largest construction litigation case ever.
  7. I can only imagine…. Why do your clients hire you?
    I can handle very complicated construction delay cases efficiently. And low rates!
  8. Good reasons indeed. How are you and your firm responding to financial difficulties your clients may be experiencing?
    Our rates are low so we can litigate for clients who have a tight budget.
  9. You are certified as LEED AP (the 2nd to be interviewed on 22 Tweets!). How does that help your clients?
    I understand legal risks that arise from LEED process. And I can properly draft LEED project contracts
  10. Why aren’t more traditional construction firms embracing green building, particularly given the economy?
    Initial costs to learn green construction is a barrier. And green still not in demand in majority of country.
  11. Is that changing? Will green building ever have a meaningful impact on the country’s energy requirements? When?
    Absolutely. Absolutely. The stimulus includes $25B for green building. Will have big impact and market will shift.
  12. That’s welcome news… How do you market your practice?
    My blog is my homebase. I use it to generate leads, speaking and writing opportunities. @lexblog is the best!
  13. How much time would you say you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Maybe an hour? I lost track a long time ago.
  14. Bet it’s more than that… You mentioned your blog (http://bit.ly/GhOE). Why do you write it and who should read it?
    I write it because I’m concerned about legal issues facing green building industry.
    Green building industry professionals who recognize risk should read it.
  15. Has blogging made you a better lawyer? How?
    Definitely. I look for issues that could harm my clients before they happen.
  16. A nice value-add for them. What impact have your Web 2.0 activities had on referrals and client engagements?
    My best green building contacts are direct result of my blog and twitter. And more diversified contacts.
  17. Nice value-add for you…. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The entire legal landscape has shifted. Firms got too big. I am very concerned for young associates.
  18. Perhaps trend changing:could argue that firms are shrinking… What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Firms shrinking means associates fired. 10 years: smaller, regional firms. Lower rates or even flat rates.
  19. Interesting perspective re fees. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I think I would be a novelist, like Hemingway. I would go crazy like him too.
  20. Phew. Good thing you got into law school…. How do you want to be remembered?
    Professionally: dedicated and fair. Personally: good husband.
  21. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Watch Kansas Jayhawks sporting events. Some might say I am a bit obsessed with Kansas basketball.
  22. Last question for you today: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Recognize that things have changed. Figure out your passion and write and talk about it all the time.

Thanks for the interview today. It was fun!

Thank you very much for tweeting with 22 Tweets and answering our questions. This was a great twitterview.

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