@seattlelawgirl

April 30th, 2009

valValerie A. Farris

Small Business Lawyer

Owner, Farrris Law, PLLC

Law Blogger

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @seattlelawgirl: small business lawyer, salsa dancer, traveler, auntie and friend

  1. @Seattlelawgirl, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is @Seattlelawgirl?
    I am a Detroit-born, island-raised, entrepreneur-by-blood Lebanese-American lawyer living & practicing small biz law in Seattle, WA
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I help small biz owners plan 4 future success, limit liability, & avoid litigation whenever possible! I also do estate planning.
     
  3. Can you describe your typical small business owner client?
    Small, independently-owned biz, everything from artists to techies. Savvy, forward-thinking, active in Web 2.0 world.
    My clients are ppl who want 2 protect themselves (& their families) legally 2 ensure peace of mind & security 4 their futures.
     
  4. What, then, would you say is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Avoiding litigation, for most. Plus learning not 2 be penny wise & pound foolish. Legal services can seem costly…
    but NOT having the right protections in place is even more so. How can I protect my biz while balancing the cost?
     
  5. Indeed. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
    Not as much as it’s hurting big biz. Small biz is better able to adapt to changing economy, which means less loss/negative impact.
     
  6. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I explain atty-client relationship & let them know I will always tell the truth even if they don’t want to hear it…
    I also talk about advocacy & the counselor-at-law part of the work I do, & that really gives my clients peace of mind.
     
  7. I’m sure it does. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Representing my sis when she adopted my nephew! Extremely significant personally, & also my 1st in-court appearance. Poignant & fun!
     
  8. A different kind of pressure than you’re used to facing…. Why do your clients hire you?
    b/c I am a small biz owner, I understand the needs & challenges they face. & b/c I value ppl & relationships; my clients sense that.
     
  9. How do you market your practice?
    For me, building relationships = marketing. I haven’t spent a $ on advertising & don’t plan to. Networking & social media.
     
  10. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    My brand is delivering intelligent, creative, & cost-effective legal solutions/advice. So, in a sense, every minute I’m working…
    …I’m building my brand! I also spend about an hour/day on web 2.0 stuff, & I attend networking events often.
     
  11. You publish a blog on your firm’s website (http://bit.ly/17tt7t). How would you describe it? Who should read it?
    I’d describe it as a plain-English intro to legal concepts & choices, & also my contribution to demystifing lawyers & the law…
    Who should read my blog? Small biz owners; anyone curious about the law; those who want 2 see a lawyer be real & accessible.
     
  12. What benefits have you realized from blogging?
    It’s reinforced my commitment 2 using plain Eng. in my practice & enhances my ability 2 clearly give options & advice 2 my clients.
     
  13. Sounds like a win-win all around! When and why did you become active on Twitter?
    A few months ago; 1st to see what the hype was about; later, b/c I realized I could provide value & build relationships here.
     
  14. Beyond Twitter and your blog, what other social networking tools do you regularly use?
    Biznik is my favorite – it’s a GREAT tool 4 indie biz ppl that marries online networking w/ in-person meetings, hosted by members…
    Their website: http://tinyurl.com/dybm2m Founded by @danmccomb & Lara Feltin, fellow Seattleites!
     
  15. I’ll have to check it out. How have your Web 2.0 activities impacted your practice?
    Without exaggeration, 100% of my biz comes through my web 2.0 activities & word of mouth referrals. Pretty cool, I think!
     
  16. Wow. Let’s switch gears: what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    The most sig. issue = public perception of lawyers. We need 2 battle that by being better entrepreneurs & counselors 4 our clients.
     
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Like the rest of the biz world! Better client service. More flat fees, less billable time. More small/solo firms & specialization.
     
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I’d own a restaurant or B&B and travel half the year! That’d be the marriage of nearly all my passions (languages, food, travel).
     
  19. That would be a pretty nice lifestyle…. How do you want to be remembered?
    As someone who values people & relationships above all things. I want 2 be remembered w/ love & joy & laughter.
     
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    Spend time w/ my boyfriend, family, & friends. Esp. my niece & nephews! Cook, read, run, dance, travel…soak it up and live it up!
     
  21. What languages do you speak?
    French, Spanish, & Lebanese Arabic…with varying degrees of fluency!
     
  22. And English too, of course…. Final question: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Work hard, play hard, remember what’s important. Invest ur time in ppl & things u value. Choose ur life, don’t let “it” choose u.
    Pretty much the same advice I’d give anyone. Don’t let law school rule u or change who u are!

Good advice indeed. This was a great twitterview; thank you for tweeting with 22 Tweets and answering our questions

Thanks so much for having me – it’s been fun!

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@scottwolfejr

April 28th, 2009

sw

Scott G. Wolfe, Jr.

Construction lawyer and Member, Wolfe Law Group

LEED AP

Serial Blogger: author of Blogging is Speaking, Brazil Construction Law, Chinese Drywall Blog, Construction Law Monitor, Construction Lien Blog, and Louisiana Green Building Law

Entrepreneur and a whole lot more

Today, we’re tweeting with @scottwolfejr: lawyer, entrepreneur, and New Orleans City Business Magazine 2008 Innovator of the Year

  1. @Scottwolfejr, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Who is the person behind @Scottwolfejr?
    Thnx for having me. So, this 1st Q is very easy or hard. Easy: Me Hard: Husband, entrepreneur, attorney & student.
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    We focus exclusively on construction law, w/ offices in SEA, WA and N.O., LA. We’re 4 yrs old, do smart work, young & fun.
     
  3. Sounds like you like what you do…. What type of clients do you represent?
    We do. Generally builders, suppliers, trades & others in constr. industry. Size varies; we rep multi-million $ co.’s – mom & pops
     
  4. What’s the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Those who installed Chinese Drywall in N.O., this stuff carries big consequences. http://www.chinesedrywallblog.com ….
    More generally- Obama Employment Law and Immigration changes. http://bit.ly/oJNvQ
     
  5. What then is the single most important business issue affecting your clients?
    In SEA w/ recession, many need business, & are trying to transition from private sector to public sector in light of stimulus…
    In NOLA, recession hasn’t hit hard. Payment & cash flow is always problem here, & keeping good documentation on projects
     
  6. Striking how diff those two markets appear to be. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    I tell them thank you, that I want to learn about their business & try to prepare them for legal process.
     
  7. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Hard ?. Post-Katrina, we helped a lot of people get right-side up. That had rewarding moments.
     
  8. Can only imagine what it was like trying to pick up the pieces then. Why do your clients hire you?
    I think we do a good job distinguishing our firm from the crowd, and people react to that. Plus…
    Plus, via the web, we are constantly conversing with potential clients, & they see us as an authority on construction law.
     
  9. How are you and your firm responding to the financial difficulties your clients are experiencing?
    We try to help them make good decisions about settlement v litigation & we try to contractually put them in safe positions
     
  10. Am sure they appreciate. Congratulations on your recent certification as LEED AP. What does it mean for your clients?
    Thank you. Many of our clients are interested in growing into the green market, and it means we can be a source for them
     
  11. You’re actively challenging the LA Bar’s attorney advertising rules. Why are they bad for clients and the profession?
    100 reasons. Most basic: bar regulated a medium (the net) it doesn’t understand & based on how it worked 5 yrs ago…
    Think of reasons why Internet is good for clients and profession. The new La. ad regs compromise those reasons
     
  12. Good luck with that effort. On that note, how do you market your practice?
    Exclusively through our website, blogging, SEO & social networking. Very little paid ads. Virtually 0 traditional ads.
     
  13. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    We have great help at WLG. I still spend 10% of my day on it. I figure branding req. either 10% of my day or 10% of my money.
     
  14. You have 7 (yes, seven!) blogs (see list @ http://bit.ly/t8d3). How do you manage them in the 10% of your time window?
    Its tough, but helps that I enjoy it. I get help from WLG partner @douglasreiser, our law clerk @sethsmiley and wife @emwolfe.
     
  15. Clearly you’ve embraced Web 2.0. How have your Web 2.0 activities impacted your practice?
    It makes a bi-coastal practice painless, increases our efficiency, & keeps us connected to colleagues & clients
     
  16. It’s exciting to watch and learn from you. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Staying relevant. ‘Good boys club’ isnt relevant on a global scale; automation is real; & litigation trivialities are transparent.
     
  17. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    I defer to Richard Susskind’s “The End of Lawyers” http://tinyurl.com/9qupcz
     
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    No doubt, I would simply dedicate more time to being an entrepreneur.
     
  19. Guess THAT was the easy question…. How do you want to be remembered?
    Big Q. Re: Family, I just want to be remembered fondly. Professionally, as a valuable mind.
     
  20. What do you do when you’re not working?
    My wife & I love travel & enjoy wine, & freq combine the 2. Pre-WLG, I would fly my Cessna, but recently, it just sits
     
  21. You might be the first pilot on 22 Tweets…. What languages do you speak?
    Unfortunately, only English. I can stumble through basic Spanish conversation.
     
  22. I’m pretty sure stumbling counts…. Final question: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Ignore the competition for grades. Learn the law & plan to be hard-working and innovative post-grad.

Valuable advice indeed. This was great; thank you very much for tweeting with 22 Tweets and answering our questions

That was lots of fun. Thanks for having me.

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@danharris

April 23rd, 2009

dan_harris

Daniel P. Harris

Partner, Harris & Moure

Author of the award-winning China Law Blog

Appearances on Fox News, Fox Report, CBC Report on Business, BBC World, BBC World Have Your Say

 

 

Today, we’re tweeting with @danharris: international lawyer, “Sushi grade” China Law blogger, news & movie junkie, and more

  1. @Danharris, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Who is the person behind @Danharris?
    Me. Just me.
     
  2. Can’t go wrong with that. Tell us about your law practice.
    It’s 99% international law. Maybe around 60% China, 20% Korea, 15% Russia, 5% Misc.
     
  3. What type of clients do you represent?
    From Startups to Fortune 50 companies. Most have between $5 and $300 in revenues.
    Whoops. Meant between $5 million and $300 million, not between $5 and $300.
     
  4. What is the single most important legal issue affecting those clients?
    Great question. Figuring out the law and following it.
     
  5. Imagine that’s difficult in those jurisdictions. What’s the single most important business issue affecting your clients?
    Very tough in China, yes. Toughest business issue is the credit crunch.
     
  6. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    “Hi, I’m Dan. ” Hard to generalize much beyond that….. sorry…..
     
  7. It is what it is, right? What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Helping recover $300+ million in assets from Russia RIGHT after fall of communism. Got WSJ cover story out of it. ….
    Funnest was going to Papua New Guinea to recover three helicopters.
     
  8. Impressive results. Why do your clients hire you?
    Three reasons, primarily. 1. Quality 2. Responsiveness/Concern/Personality 3. Price Fairness
     
  9. You’ve become a leading voice on China / China law in a relatively short time. What led you to your China practice?
    It’s actually taken a long time. We were big in Korea & Russia & China was thrust on us by our clients.
     
  10. How will the rule of law in China affect the way business is done in China?
    It already has & it will continue to do so. Foreign companies must follow laws or they run real risk of getting tossed.
     
  11. You may have just answered this in part, but what’s the future for foreign lawyers in China?
    Very bright. Cultural differences are a huge & permanent chasm. This holds true for most foreign countries, even European ones
     
  12. How do you market your practice?
    By never sitting still. Blogging. Speaking. Writing. Lunches. Phone calls.
     
  13. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Every minute I work I am enhancing the brand, so I will say 12-16. As my Twitter profile says, “sleep is for wussies.”
     
  14. You’re the principal author of the award-winning China Law Blog (http://bit.ly/n4k7T). Who do you write it for?
    The SME owner or CFO who is in China or thinking about going there.
     
  15. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    It creates huge media publicity, which leads to clients. Clients come in already knowing where I stand on things.
     
  16. That’s very useful, I’m sure. What is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    BigLaw costs too much. Firms must move from hourly billing. Abt 75% of my firm’s work is flat fee. Better for clients & for us
     
  17. That’s a lot! Guess we’ll need a second twitterview…. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Mega firms and specialized boutique firms. Mid-sized “national” firms will be no more.
     
  18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    Radio Talk Show Host……Full time blogger/twitterer?
     
  19. I’m sure you’d be successful at that too…. How do you want to be remembered?
    Too deep for me…. As a great father and a good person.
     
  20. More down to earth, then: what do you do when you’re not working?
    Dote on my kids, work out, read, watch TV, go to movies & plays, travel for fun.
     
  21. As opposed to traveling for clients… How many miles would you say you travel in a typical year?
    Maybe 150,000 air miles for clients…. 25,000 for pleasure. Guessing.
     
  22. That’s a lot of time in the air… Final question for you: What advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Don’t I know it. I would say don’t go to law school unless you know what you want to do with the degree once U have it.
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@taxgirl

April 21st, 2009

taxgirlavatarKelly Phillips Erb

Owner at The Erb Law Firm PC

Tax law blawger at Taxgirl: “because paying taxes is painful… but reading about them shouldn’t be.”

Mom, tax lawyer, coffee drinker, manic blogger, iPod addict – not a sleeper

Today, we’re tweeting with @taxgirl: coffee drinker, super blawger, mom, Philly native, and true tax law rockstar

  1. @Taxgirl, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Who is the person behind @Taxgirl?
    Thanks for having me! I’m pretty much exactly what I tweet about: mom, tax lawyer, blogger. And I drink a lot of coffee…
     
  2. Tell us about your law practice.
    I own a practice in Philly w my husband @jcerb (no casualties yet). We focus on int’l, tax, computer and biz law – I do the tax bit.
     
  3. Let’s hope that record lasts…. What type of clients do you represent?
    Most clients are businesses/biz owners. We rep a lot of tech companies, ISPs, the like, a # of int’l businesses (esp German/UK).
     
  4. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
    Not to be scared of tax. While it’s important to try to get it right the 1st time, there’s practically nothing that can’t be fixed.
     
  5. That makes me feel better about the return I just filed…. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
    Gosh, that’s tough, how do you define sig? Just before I started my firm, I made a great pitch to a sizable biz – they loved it.
     
  6. Yes, winning a new client as you’re starting on your own is significant. Did they say what was special about your pitch?
    No, but I knew. It was that I could think on my feet. They changed their minds about what they wanted, and I was able to respond.
    Around that time, I thought I had fallen out of love w law. I realized I loved tax law. I just didn’t love my old firm. Aha moment.
     
  7. That’s a good strength to have. What are the other reasons your clients hire you?
    I hope they hire me because I’m good at what I do and I understand that businesses aren’t just about spreadsheets.
     
  8. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
    You know, knock wood, our clients haven’t been terribly affected by the slowdown in the economy.
     
  9. They (& you) are fortunate. Do you think it stems from their businesses/industries, an improving economy or other factors?
    Some of it is definitely industry specific. I also think small-mid sized biz are often better equipped to adapt to chg.
     
  10. That’s no doubt correct. How do you market your practice?
    Lots of networking, “real life” and SM. We sponsor events. I write quite a bit and I speak often (@jcerb – be nice!)
     
  11. Looks like I’ll have to interview @jcerb soon…. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
    Good luck w that – @jcerb is very diff from me!
    I kind of am my brand, it’s hard to quantify. Is it wrong to say all of my waking hours? ;)
    maybe it’s Twitter or maybe it’s lawyers but the 22 Tweets interviewees all seem to have a similar answer to that question….
     
  12. You’ve blogged for more than four years as Taxgirl (http://bit.ly/1aAm8M). How much is there to say about taxes?
    Are you kidding me? I could talk forever @ taxes! Like it or not, practically every aspect of life can be linked to taxes.
     
  13. you really ARE a tax law rockstar! What has been the greatest benefit you’ve got from blogging?
    I guess that every day, I get to talk about interesting things w great people. How many people can say that?
     
  14. Have your Web 2.0 activities had an impact on referrals or client engagements?
    Yes and no. I actually get more biz from the web for the other attys in my firm – but that’s just as good.
     
  15. Indeed. Switching gears, what is the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
    Besides layoffs? Image. There are terrible lawyers who have ruined what folks think of us. Most lawyers are good people!
     
  16. What will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
    Despite the noise, it will look the same. The legal field is not terribly fluid/progressive (my colleagues still use DOS).
     
  17. Interesting perspective. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
    I don’t know. I’m spoiled now, so I’d have to work for myself (who wants a boss anymore?). I’d love to own a winery.
     
  18. How do you want to be remembered?
    Remembered? What have you heard? Am I going somewhere?
     
  19. OK, OK, maybe it’s not the right question. How’s this one: what do you do when you’re not working?
    Chasing after my kids or digging in the dirt (I love to garden). I also like to drink wine but that sounds sad out loud.
     
  20. You mentioned that you and your husband are law partners. Is it tough to leave your practice at the office?
    Yeah, but it’s also cool to work w someone who understands where you’re coming from, if I have to answer a call, he gets it.
    But we also have 3 small kids so we don’t have a lot of time to talk law at home: we’re busy playing zone defense.
     
  21. I get that…. For your final question, what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
    Life changes constantly. Don’t get sucked into the idea that any single moment, course or grade will define you.
    I say that having gotten my lowest grade in law school… in tax law.

Great advice made infinitely stronger by that admission! Thank you so much for tweeting with 22 Tweets today.

    [Ed. note: due to editorial oversight, @taxgirl was not asked all 22 questions….]

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    @adriandayton

    April 16th, 2009

    adriandaytonAdrian Dayton

    Solo Attorney, PR Consultant, Writer seeking Publisher

    Author of The Virtue Experiment – 12 Virtues in 12 Months

    Today, we’re tweeting with @adriandayton: lawyer, blawger, author and a man who could be described as a serial entrepreneur

    1. @adriandayton, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is the person behind @adriandayton?
      30 yrs old, live in Buffalo, NY. I’m trying to get a book published start a consulting firm & support my young family.
       
    2. Tell us about your law practice.
      My practice is starting out pretty small, I work with start-ups, a couple of not-for-profits, and a few lawyers.
       
    3. Sounds like a good start. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
      The biggest part, I want to help people succeed in there business. I ask people to be 100% honest with me, I do the same
       
    4. I’m sure they appreciate that. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
      Its especially tough on the not-for profits, people think of donations as discretionary spending- so that makes it tough.
       
    5. That must make for some difficult decisions. What’s the most significant client representation you’ve had?
      While I was still at Jaeckle Fleishmann and Mugel I was part of the team that handled a $450 million merger. That was big.
       
    6. That IS a big deal. Why do your clients hire you?
      I get things done, and I help people connect with funding sources, expertise, and whatever they are missing to be successful
       
    7. what’s it like becoming a lawyer in the midst of the worst economic crisis in 100 years?
      what economic crisis?JK- It’s not easy, but there is opportunity. I feel like I am onto something big with social media.
       
    8. I’m sure many of today’s followers would agree. How do your non-lawyer ventures impact the way you practice law?
      People don’t want just a lawyer, and it keeps me sane to have other projects. Man is not meant to draft documents all day.
       
    9. How do you market your practice?
      I market through Twitter of course. (: -Networking, online -offline. I’m engaged with my community in every way possible.
       
    10. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
      I am a new face/name in Buffalo and in the social media world. I spend on average 4-5 hr/day to work to change that.
       
    11. Tell us about your blog (http://bit.ly/YugF7). Why should we read it?
      b/c its awesome- blog is about virtues. I think old world virtues will solve many of our modern probs. http://bit.ly/YugF7
      I also write about social media and the law about once a week. So there’s that.
      watch for my new website though, it will go live next Monday, April 20th.
       
    12. You’re clearly convinced, but why should lawyers actively engage in social networking?
      Social media is not for ALL lawyers, but neither are computers.
      Seriously, social media is how the world is communicating. Lawyers need to be a major part of that.
       
    13. All of them? Why might it NOT be good for some lawyers to get into social networking?
      Some lawyers punch in, sit down, and crank out the billable hours. Social media won’t help them. SM is for the rainmakers.
       
    14. Indeed. What impact have your Web 2.0 activities had on your own workflow (referrals, client engagements, etc)?
      I brought my first corporate client in using Twitter, while at Jaeckle. I’ve also been interviewed LIVE on Twitter :)
       
    15. As you said: SM is for the rainmakers…. Why did you become a lawyer?
      To be honest, I didn’t go to law school to become a lawyer. I was hoping it would make me a better businessman, we’ll see.
       
    16. What’s the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
      Survival, the old model isn’t working. Billable hours, partners, associates- not the best way, people are figuring it out.
       
    17. So what do you think the legal landscape will look like in 10 years?
      Social media is here to stay, in 10 years there will be widespread convergence of all media- some type of super-feed
      information will be so much easier to access because people will be so much easier to connect with. All lawyers will use it.
       
    18. Interesting idea. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer, or rather, if you weren’t pursuing your current path?
      Easy question, if I weren’t a lawyer I would be either an astronaut, delta force member, or a school teacher.
       
    19. There’s a good joke in that juxtaposition, but I’m not clever enough to find it…. How do you want to be remembered?
      I would hope to be remembered like George Bailey from It’s a Wonderful Life. A good friend, someone who helped others.
       
    20. What do you do when you’re not working?
      I love travel with family & reading more than anything else. & I love the outdoors: golf, sailing, swimming, wakeboarding.
       
    21. What languages do you speak?
      I learned fluent Spanish while living in Chile, & I’m also learning some sign language with my son- I only know 20-30 signs.
       
    22. Perhaps a 22 Tweets first… Your final question today: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
      DONT DO IT jk- I loved law school, but if u don’t know if u want to be a lawyer- don’t go to an expensive law school.
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    @marshallrisaacs

    April 14th, 2009

    marshall_-_profile_photo_08Marshall R. Isaacs

    Business / Corporate Litigation and Personal Injury Trial Lawyer

    Author of two blawgs: Summary Judgement and Smallville, the New York State Bar Association’s official blog for solo and small firm attorneys

    Tenacious, Unrepentant Litigator, Negotiator and Draftsman

    Today, we’re tweeting with trial lawyer and blawger @MarshallRIsaacs, who recently blogged “Twitter: For Birds, Not Lawyers”

    1. @MarshallRIsaacs, thank you for joining us today on Twitter. Tell us: who is the person behind @MarshallRIsaacs?
      Thanks for having me. I’m a born and bred New Yawker. Tenacious litigator. Independent thinker. Fisherman. Loyal friend.
       
    2. Tell us about your law practice.
      I’m a litigator and trial attorney handling commercial, breach of contract & tort cases.
       
    3. What type of clients do you represent?
      Various businesses and individuals: publicists, nightclubs, construction contractors, web designers, even an adult video company!
       
    4. Another 22 Tweets first, I believe…. What is the most important legal issue affecting your clients?
      Breach of contract! So many people use cheapy forms downloaded from the web. I refer to these fondly as “lawsuits waiting to happen”
       
    5. What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?
      I can’t guarantee how much it will cost or how long it will take. I can only guarantee that I’ll give it my all.
       
    6. How is the economic crisis affecting your clients?
      There’s more litigation but fewer who can afford it. Thankfully, my firm is small & nimble so I can be flexible with fee structures.
       
    7. What was the most significant client representation you’ve had?
      I lost a big $ slip/fall case against a top-name Plaintiff’s firm but convinced the appeals court to reverse. Case dismissed!
       
    8. That’s a great result! How were you able to convince them?
      I kept my brief under 140 characters. : ) Just good old fashioned lawyering.
       
    9. Perhaps *great* old fashioned lawyering might be more fitting… Why do your clients hire you?
      I know what I’m doing and I’m extremely generous with my time and advice.
      I think you should adjust the camera, Lance. You’re not getting my good-side.
       
    10. Sure I am…. How do you market your practice?
      Referrals & Adwords. Also, a lot is done in court: I’m proud to say that many of my referrals come from former adversaries.
       
    11. That’s a sign of true respect. How much time do you spend each day developing / enhancing your brand?
      24/7/365. I AM my brand and I try to convey it in everything I do. (Sappy, but true!)
       
    12. If it works… You wrote that Twitter is for birds, not lawyers (http://bit.ly/VfYhc). Why are you on Twitter then?
      Lots of tweople post articles that get my goat; Makes 4 great blogging. For blogless esqs, Twitter’s no more than an AOL chat-room
       
    13. So Twitter good for feeding blawg traffic? Have you realized any professional value from your activity on Twitter
      Kevin O’Keefe and I would both disagree with the blog-traffic statement. Maybe we’ll discuss it for another time!
      OK, if you agree to come back for another twitterview….
      Yes. The NYSBA stumbled upon my blog “Summary Judgment” thru Twitter and invited me to write for them. http://bit.ly/2cZuCD
       
    14. How will your NY State Bar Association blog (http://bit.ly/2RXU) differ from your personal blog?
      I’m going to have to watch my Ps & Qs! There’s an under/over on how long I can last…want in?! LOL
       
    15. I’d bet on long…. Beyond Twitter and blogging, what other social networking tools do you regularly use?
      I love Facebook. Where else could I discover that if I were a dog I’d be a golden retriever?
       
    16. Tenacious, generous… it makes sense. What’s the most significant issue currently facing the legal profession?
      Unemployment.
       
    17. Indeed. So what will the legal landscape look like in 10 years?
      There will be just as much hot air but a lot less paper.
       
    18. What would you do if you weren’t a lawyer?
      I’d be the almost-award-winning author of numerous unfinished novels!
       
    19. I’m guessing that career path is more crowded than you might think…. How do you want to be remembered?
      I’d like to be remembered as someone who always tried to do the right thing…and was the first to acknowledge when I didn’t.
       
    20. What do you do when you’re not working?
      Dating. Wait a minute, you said NOT working. Make that sleeping.
       
    21. Again, there’s no doubt a good story there that’ll have to wait for next twitterview. What languages do you speak?
      CPLR (Civil Practice Law and Rules). This is a language unto itself and actually has its own translator at the U.N.
       
    22. Our last question of the day: what advice do you have for people going to law school today?
      Don’t let ‘em convince you that only grades matter. Compassion, persistence and a pressed shirt are just as important.
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